History

Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food
Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food Reviews

Review: Where else will you read on the gastronomy of cannibalism? The societal collapse vís-a-vís the microwave oven? Read more

The Library of Greek Mythology
The Library of Greek Mythology Reviews

Review: the bibliotheca of the pseudo-apollodorus, rather. nice little summation. Read more

Epic: Stories of Survival from the World's Highest Peaks
Epic: Stories of Survival from the World's Highest Peaks Reviews

Review: I love these stories of the crazy things people do... Read more

Mirrors of the Unseen: Journeys in Iran
Mirrors of the Unseen: Journeys in Iran Reviews

Review: Another good travelogue of Iran. Keep 'em comimg. I just can't seem to get enough. Only it's not like there are tons of books out there of my detailed and interesting trip through Iran. Maybe I should write one? Do you think they'd give me a visa? Read more

Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World
Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World Reviews

Review: A wonderful read about the history and discovery of the brain. Read more

At the Water's Edge: Fish with Fingers, Whales with Legs, and How Life Came Ashore but Then Went Back to Sea
At the Water's Edge: Fish with Fingers, Whales with Legs, and How Life Came Ashore but Then Went Back to Sea Reviews

Review: Dec. 21--This book is just outstanding! It is the only book that clearly shows how natural selection and evolution really >work< through macroevolution, or the evolution of large body structures. The story that Zimmer relates of how some critters have gone into the sea, back to the land, and repeated this several times, taught me stuff that even I hadn't heard about (as an eclectic reader of evolutionary biology tomes). There's also a fine amount of the history of paleontology woven into t... Read more

Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea
Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea Reviews

Review: Brilliant non-technical summary of the history and modern advances in evolutionary science. I think the part about the formation of our planet and the Precambrian era with the first multicellular species was particularly intriguing.

I learned a great deal about the origin of mankind (I did not know for example that we were an entirely different branch of the hominids than the homo erectus). In the last chapter Zimmer does a great job revealing the hidden agenda of creationists in the USA... Read more

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