Skellig

Written by: David Almond

Skellig Book Cover
Unhappy about his baby sister's illness and the chaos of moving into a dilapidated old house, Michael retreats to the garage and finds a mysterious stranger who is something like a bird and something like an angel...
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Skellig Reviews

Hebe Way
This is a very clever and enchanting book that can be interpreted in many ways. I found the way it's written fascinating, because it encapsulates the world of childhood innocence as we venture through the story from young Michael's perspective. Even though it explores some quite sad and dark (and at times, scary!) content, it has a warming lift that will make you smile as you witness the power of friendship, love and belief.
Nigel Lungenmuss-Ward
This book is extraordinary! To quote my 7-year-old daughter, 'this book carries you away!' Almond does this through the delivery of a gripping narrative and beautiful imagery. I would recommend this book to anyone! I loved it and I am 30!
Tamsin
David Almond has created a wonderfully captivating tale about Michael and his family, his friend Mina and Skellig, himself.

I couldn't put this book down; I wanted to find out who Skellig was; if Michael's sister was going to be okay and to hang out with Michael and Mina as they had a really good friendship; with Mina quoting William Blake's poetry and facts about birds.

I feel that the magical realism within this story has been done properly and effectively. It was Michael's and Mina's little sec David Almond has created a wonderfully captivating tale about Michael and his family, his friend Mina and Skellig, himself.

I couldn't put this book down; I wanted to find out who Skellig was; if Michael's sister was going to be okay and to hang out with Michael and Mina as they had a really good friendship; with Mina quoting William Blake's poetry and facts about birds.

I feel that the magical realism within this story has been done properly and effectively. It was Michael's and Mina's little secret to help nurse Skellig back to health with a '27 and 53', 'beer', 'cod liver oil capsules' and 'aspirin' without the help from adults. And as a result of the children's kindness, Skellig helps Michael and his family.

Would definitely recommend this book to both adults and children - A fascinating lighthearted tale that animates the imagination.
I Heard the Owl Call My Name :: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet :: The Stranger :: The Prophet of Yonwood :: Frog
K.A.
This was dark, weird, enchanting, sad, and so beautifully done. I finished it on an emotionally draining day which made it all the more poignant and heart-tugging. Love this little gem.
Chloe (thelastcolour)
"Who are you?"
"Nobody."

I am writing this through misty eyes and with tears rolling down my cheeks. This book is both beautiful and tragic, I think we all know that these two things come hand in hand.

'Skellig' is a children's book but in no way does that make it unimportant. The fact that this was an easy read meant that I could delve deeper into what David Almond wanted the reader to think about. I'm still not entirely sure if I've grasped everything, but that makes it even more extraordin "Who are you?"
"Nobody."

I am writing this through misty eyes and with tears rolling down my cheeks. This book is both beautiful and tragic, I think we all know that these two things come hand in hand.

'Skellig' is a children's book but in no way does that make it unimportant. The fact that this was an easy read meant that I could delve deeper into what David Almond wanted the reader to think about. I'm still not entirely sure if I've grasped everything, but that makes it even more extraordinary and breathtaking.

This is a short, fantasy novel about an unclassified, mythical being. An unconfirmed angel that is grumpy and cynical and suffering from arthritis. There is no romance, which made me a very happy reader! Romance certainly would have diminished the importance of the symbolism in this story.

Mina is an intelligent, strong-minded girl who isn't afraid to speak her mind. She is everything that I wished that I could have been as a child. Michael is as equally intelligent but far more reserved - yet so incredibly brave.

David Almond has created a most poignant story laced with innocence, myth, magic and the fragility of life. This book will haunt you forever. It really highlights how little we know about the world, and that's okay.

"Sometimes we think we should be able to know everything. But we can't. We have to allow ourselves to see what there is to see, and we have to imagine."

DanniElla
I loved this book, and so did my children as we read it together. It's a fantasy, but feels so real. It's about love, and life, and growing up, and about changes, fears and hope and miracles. Sure, there is more to it, there are deeper meanings for those that like digging and thinking the books thoroughly, but I don't feel the need to overanalyze and go beyond this beautifully written simple, pure story.
Ahmad Sharabiani
This is a beautifully written book that introduces many questions about the human condition in an artful, sensitive manner, appealing to young and older readers alike. The characters were refreshingly pure, and though wise beyond their years and not entirely credible were so lovely that it just didn't matter. This book made me feel happy.:)
Furrawn
This book has tremendous heart. A family buys a rundown estate. There's a garage that needs to be knocked down. Inside something is alive.

Shoulder blades are where wings used to be. Flight. Angels. Owls. Birds. Flight. Hope. Joy. Find all these and more within the pages of Skellig.

Read. Read. Read.
Elizabeth
Gorgeous, gorgeous book. So much packed into one story. Skellig questions, in a gentle way, where we've come from, who we are, and who we might become, and left me with a renewed sense of wonder at the natural world around me.
Anagha
I thought the very beginning was a little slow, but it really picked up and I loved this book. I recommend this to all readers, since it has a little bit of fantasy, adventure, and realistic fiction all at the same time.
16PosnerS
Although this book has a fantasy genre, it is also a tale of relationships and of interacting with the world. It is a stand-alone novel, which is understandable as the ending of the book is one which is hard to continue from. I thoroughly enjoyed this action-packed novel. It is definitely a page turner. The plot is very unexpected and, with so many things going on at once, it would be but impossible to preempt. In my opinion, some elements of the ending were unpredictable - which for me were the Although this book has a fantasy genre, it is also a tale of relationships and of interacting with the world. It is a stand-alone novel, which is understandable as the ending of the book is one which is hard to continue from. I thoroughly enjoyed this action-packed novel. It is definitely a page turner. The plot is very unexpected and, with so many things going on at once, it would be but impossible to preempt. In my opinion, some elements of the ending were unpredictable - which for me were the good parts. However, other parts were hinted upon earlier in the novel, meaning that they were not as meaningful and potent when I read it. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who is 10 years old or more. It is a great read!
Beatrice
"«Che cos'è?»
«Non si può sapere. A volte dobbiamo solo accettare che ci sono cose che non si possono sapere. Perché tua sorella è malata? Perché mio padre è morto?» Mi prese la mano. «A volte pensiamo che dovremmo essere capaci di sapere tutto, ma non è così. Dobbiamo accontentarci di vedere quello che c'è da vedere e il resto dobbiamo immaginarlo»."

Emily Kerr
I thought it was a pretty good book. I think that the book is a metaphor and tells you a lot about life through the story. It is simple and has a low reading level but it is quick and definitely worth reading.
Dorotea
Skellig by David Almond is a wonderful book about a boy, Michael, whose baby sister is very ill, and his friend Mina and the creature (angel?) he has found in an abandoned garage. It’s a tale of hope and friendship, with a touch of supernatural and many references to Blake. Lovely, really.
Emma (howlsmovinglibrary)
I read this for my children's literature course, but wasn't very impressed. I'm very aware that I'm reading this for the first time as an adult, rather than a child, but I just felt like none of the interesting aspects of the book were explored in enough depth, and struggled to remain invested.
Anastazja
I remember getting it from school library and being proud of reading book for teens.
As now I know I wasn't completely right I still have to admit I have a sentiment for this story. Darkness and mistery make it gripping and fascinating.
Julie Reynolds
Wow. What can I say. I shed tears of happiness at the end. Absolutely beautiful book for children aged 10 and over. A gifted author indeed Wow. What can I say. I shed tears of happiness at the end. Absolutely beautiful book for children aged 10 and over. A gifted author indeed
Leore
Ko god da nije dao pet zvezdica ne zaslužuje da mu izrastu krila.
Silvia Jackson
Enjoyed this book even though was disturbed by some of the content! Good to see the story told from a childs perspective!
Jake N
A book that reminds you the power of literature and that children feel big and powerful things. An absolute marvel that I somehow looked past for too long. Almond has been one of my favorites for a while but I never got around to this one until now.
Vivian He
I think this is a very good book. In this book , it has two numbers, you can see that in every pages, before i do not know what it this two numbers mean. When i read this book a lot, i know this two numbers, is the Chinese restaurant food numbers. The character family usually go to that restaurant to eat that two number food. In this book, i think a character name is very interesting, Dr. Death. In a part, they are very despair, and they very very very want to die.
Izzy
finally read the book I meant to in 3rd grade!
Lucynell
This is my second children's book of the year and it's another minor diamond. Though it lacks the emotional impact of Terabithia it makes it up with better language, better characterization, awesome observations and a restrain that is as delicate as is gripping. It's a peculiar little thing that if it is aimed at children then it must mean children in the broader sense. Alright, it's for everyone and at 170 pages long there is absolutely nothing that would justify anyone passing it by if it come This is my second children's book of the year and it's another minor diamond. Though it lacks the emotional impact of Terabithia it makes it up with better language, better characterization, awesome observations and a restrain that is as delicate as is gripping. It's a peculiar little thing that if it is aimed at children then it must mean children in the broader sense. Alright, it's for everyone and at 170 pages long there is absolutely nothing that would justify anyone passing it by if it comes one's way.
Nafiza
Skellig came rather enthusiastically recommended by our MACL chair and so I read it because it seemed interesting and well, because I am on a mission to immerse myself in all sorts of literature for children. In a genre that is overflowing with teen angels who are more angsty than you would think, Skellig is refreshingly different. This is middle grade rather than YA and not exactly paranormal in the ordinary sense of the word. The titular character is one of the most fascinating characters I ha Skellig came rather enthusiastically recommended by our MACL chair and so I read it because it seemed interesting and well, because I am on a mission to immerse myself in all sorts of literature for children. In a genre that is overflowing with teen angels who are more angsty than you would think, Skellig is refreshingly different. This is middle grade rather than YA and not exactly paranormal in the ordinary sense of the word. The titular character is one of the most fascinating characters I have come across in literature – complex layers, ambiguous origins that remain obdurate even at the end, contradictory personality that successfully shows the vulnerability in the character.

For a children’s novel, Skellig is extremely sophisticated in its character construction. It is sensitive to gender issues and tackles themes of actual learning (which can be done anywhere and perhaps with greater richness) and school learning (that occurs in the rarified air of a classroom and is a particular type of learning that does not have the richness of learning that should be present in childhood). The main character is going through tough times – moving, a very sick baby sister and general isolation from things and people he is familiar to and absent parents. His fascination with what looks like a hobo in the garden shed is instantly worrying. Who is this odd character? Does he mean harm? Skellig is presented as an adult in this children’s world and to modern readers, there will be shades of villainy in his presence in the story.

However, Almond succeeds in narrating Skellig as this owl/angel character that defies all stereotypes one may have of his species. The book is almost uncomfortably realistic in its portrayal and yet there is this element of hope that becomes turgid with each revelation. The portion where the owls feed Skellig is one of my favourite sections of the novel. It just adds so much potential to his character.

Michael’s friendships with the girl next door and his school friends are realistically portrayed. I liked how Almond avoided melodrama and pathos but sustained this genuine feeling of grief where the sick baby is concerned. All in all, this was a worthy piece of literature that lingers long after the last page has been turned. It is also a short read so if you have time and are curious about owl/angels, I reckon you should give this a try.
Natalia
I was just amazed at David Almond's 'Skellig'. It is one of those rare books that is most definitely a children’s book but adults will also marvel at the deft touches of tenderness and personality each character is given.
Having read it at school myself I roughly recall the story however, re-reading it again with year 5 recently, it reminded me of how magical childhood is.

It is about a boy called Michael with a poorly baby sister who is nearly always in hospital. His family has moved to Falconer I was just amazed at David Almond's 'Skellig'. It is one of those rare books that is most definitely a children’s book but adults will also marvel at the deft touches of tenderness and personality each character is given.
Having read it at school myself I roughly recall the story however, re-reading it again with year 5 recently, it reminded me of how magical childhood is.

It is about a boy called Michael with a poorly baby sister who is nearly always in hospital. His family has moved to Falconer road and when Michael was looking around the neighborhood he finds a man in a garage called Skellig. Mina (the girl next door) makes friends with Michael and together they help Skellig. They also find out a secret but you would have to read the book if you want to find out what it is. The plot will engage boys and girls alike.

The story is very moving and it is beautifully written. It handles some tough issues very sensitively. It touches into your deepest sense of what love and acceptance could mean. It's brilliantly written and evokes many emotions and the story develops into a small timeless masterpiece. What a creative mind David Almond has the three main characters Michael, Mina and Skellig are wonderful and all flow together in an adventure; a vibrant, inventive, creative world that leaves you with a sense of the extraordinary. I urge anyone at any age to read this fantastic book!

In year 5 Skellig is part of the schools 'power of reading project' and fits in beautifully with the lessons provided alongside the novel that allow great opportunities for discussion of emotions, experiences, role plays, freeze frames, poetry, diary entries, newspaper reports etc...
The Power of Reading project CLPE’s highly successful project enhances teachers’ and children’s pleasure in reading, and raises children’s achievement through teachers’ knowledge of literature and its creative use in the classroom. It’s worth checking out!
Emily Valenti
What a beautifully written and captivating story. Skellig tells a tale of Michael, who like many young boys enjoys football, school and spending time with his family; Mum, Dad and baby sister. Yet his baby sister is ill and it seems like she will never get better. Michael, feeling the distress of this, stays at home with his Dad to help make their new house nicer for when she does return from hospital.

Michael carries a special secret. While exploring his new surroundings he stumbles across somet What a beautifully written and captivating story. Skellig tells a tale of Michael, who like many young boys enjoys football, school and spending time with his family; Mum, Dad and baby sister. Yet his baby sister is ill and it seems like she will never get better. Michael, feeling the distress of this, stays at home with his Dad to help make their new house nicer for when she does return from hospital.

Michael carries a special secret. While exploring his new surroundings he stumbles across something exceptional in a deep, dark corner of the garage. A strange, irritable creature who collects moth balls and appears to be turning into stone because of someone called ‘Arthur Itis’. Michael is longing to tell someone his secret. When he meets his neighbour Mina, an intriguing girl, who is home-schooled, likes to draw and read William Blake, he knows he can confide in her.

So now she knows the special secret and they both share it together; assuring each other that it is real. “I told myself I was stupid. I told myself I’d been dreaming. I told myself I wouldn’t see him again. But I did.” With an owls call and midnight ventures into the wilderness together they manage to save this extraordinary being, or does it save them?

But what is this beautiful creature, is it a bird? A man? An angel?

This would be a great book for Y3/Y4 children to read as a whole class, in guided reading or independently. They could create story boards to illustrate various points in the book, character profiles, what they think Skellig might be/represent. Even younger children, after having it read to them over a few sessions, could create their own wings. It may also be used as inspiration for creative writing, they could carry on the story: where did Skellig go, what did he do?
Inga
Michael zieht mit seinen Eltern in ein stark renovierungsbedürftiges Haus, erkundet die Umgebung und findet in der zugerümpelten Grage ein Wesen, das eigentlich kein Mensch mehr sein kann, so verfallen wirkt es. Michael spricht dennoch mit ihm, bringt ihm zu essen und zu trinken. Es ist die passende Ablenkung davon, dass seine kleine Babyschwester wieder zurück ins Krankenhaus und um ihr Leben kämpfen muss. Michael fühlt sich verantwortlich, fühlt eine merkwürdige Verbindung zu seiner Schwester Michael zieht mit seinen Eltern in ein stark renovierungsbedürftiges Haus, erkundet die Umgebung und findet in der zugerümpelten Grage ein Wesen, das eigentlich kein Mensch mehr sein kann, so verfallen wirkt es. Michael spricht dennoch mit ihm, bringt ihm zu essen und zu trinken. Es ist die passende Ablenkung davon, dass seine kleine Babyschwester wieder zurück ins Krankenhaus und um ihr Leben kämpfen muss. Michael fühlt sich verantwortlich, fühlt eine merkwürdige Verbindung zu seiner Schwester und zu diesem Wesen, von dem wir später erfahren, dass es Skellig heißt (so auch der Originaltitel von 1998, benannt nach den Skellig Islands vor Irland).
(view spoiler)[
Dann trifft Michael auch noch auf Mina, die nebenan wohnt, von ihrer Mutter zuhause unterrichtet wird und die Welt mit ganz anderen Augen sieht. Sie hilft ihm dabei, Skellig zu versorgen, und staunt mit ihm gemeinsam, wie dieser sich zunehmend verändert und wie ihm Flügel wachsen...

Die Flügel haben in David Almonds Geschichte eine große Symbolkraft, die in ihrer Schlichtheit auch für die Zielgruppe des Kinderromans funktioniert. Gleichzeitig geht es um die großen Themen Familie und Freundschaft. Michaels alte Jungenfreundschaften werden in der Krise auf die Probe gestellt, während Mina mit ihrer Andersartigkeit mit schlafwandlerischer Sicherheit Michaels wunde Punkte erkennt und ihm trotz der noch neuen Freundschaft beisteht. Und auch wenn ihr mystisches Wunderwesen weiterzieht, bleiben beiden die Erinnerungen und die Wirklichkeit und das Wissen, dass auch Menschen Flügel haben, auch wenn man sie nicht sieht.
(hide spoiler)]
Zeit des Mondes ist eine anrührende und beeindruckende Geschichte, die zu Recht zahlreiche Preise gewonnen hat.

Megha
I read this for school, and I'm unsure about my feelings. I was going to give it five stars... Skellig was an enjoyable read and everything, but not actually very good literature; I think the writing style is really simple and not amazing or anything. There were also a lot of loose threads at the end: Who is Skellig? WHAT is he? Why was he in the garden shed?

I slightly understand that David Almond was trying to make it a little mysterious, but instead of just mysterious it felt like hearing thre I read this for school, and I'm unsure about my feelings. I was going to give it five stars... Skellig was an enjoyable read and everything, but not actually very good literature; I think the writing style is really simple and not amazing or anything. There were also a lot of loose threads at the end: Who is Skellig? WHAT is he? Why was he in the garden shed?

I slightly understand that David Almond was trying to make it a little mysterious, but instead of just mysterious it felt like hearing three quarters of a story. It didn't feel completely finished...

I'm glad Mina and Michael became friends (I knew they would), but the friendship didn't feel right to me either. I mean, about two days after they met, they became wonderful friends. They were holding hands already and all. It doesn't feel right to me, for some reason, but that might just be me.

So it might seem a surprise that I gave it four stars, but the plot of this book is simply amazing, and I loved the book for it's simplicity too! Although sometimes it seemed too simple. IN CONCLUSION (yay!), I think that if David Almond had actually written this a bit more detailed, a bit more like it wasn't written by a kid (no offence - it was still nice!), I would have enjoyed it more, because I love long books. This book could have been much longer! I know that if *I* had to rewrite it it would be a bit longer, a bit more detailed, but since this is aimed at children, I'll let that pass.

(Seriously, WHY does it say YA in the genres? I really don't think it's a YA book.)
Khalida wahid
Skellig is about a young boy called Michael whose parents decide to move into a old run down house despite his protests. Michael isn’t very keen as it would mean leaving his old house, life and friends. The house has a rundown garage which Michael is told he is not to go inside. Like most people the forbidden becomes more so attractive and Michael inevitably journeys into finding out what lies inside the garage. – and with his parents distracted with preparing for the arrival of a new baby Micha Skellig is about a young boy called Michael whose parents decide to move into a old run down house despite his protests. Michael isn’t very keen as it would mean leaving his old house, life and friends. The house has a rundown garage which Michael is told he is not to go inside. Like most people the forbidden becomes more so attractive and Michael inevitably journeys into finding out what lies inside the garage. – and with his parents distracted with preparing for the arrival of a new baby Michael is more or less left to his own to explore.
To his surprise Michael finds a man like being in the garage and who speaks in what appears to be riddles. Michael is drawn to the man and along with a new friend Mina (a carefree young girl who is homeschooled) brings him food and begins to care for him.
Skellig follows the adventure of discovery, growing up, friendship and new beginnings.
It is a taught provoking and heartfelt read.
There are many activities that can be carried out with a class when reading this book such as drama for acting out different scene, hot seating, and writing diary entries as well reading short passages and asking the pupils to write what might happen next?
This book is more suitable for ages 9-13yrs.
Hyoeun
A book called ‘Skellig’ written by David Almond is a very eye-catching and interesting book which makes you to keep wondering what is going to happen next. This book is about a boy called Michael who is ten years old. While his parents are worried about a newborn baby who was born faster than expected and who might not survive, he finds a strange creature called Skellig from his old garage. He decides to let his neighbor, Mina to know it and soon they move him to a safer place because Skellig co A book called ‘Skellig’ written by David Almond is a very eye-catching and interesting book which makes you to keep wondering what is going to happen next. This book is about a boy called Michael who is ten years old. While his parents are worried about a newborn baby who was born faster than expected and who might not survive, he finds a strange creature called Skellig from his old garage. He decides to let his neighbor, Mina to know it and soon they move him to a safer place because Skellig could be easily found in Michael’s old garage. While they were moving Skellig, they found out that Skellig had a pair of wings. Skellig turns out to be a mixture of a bird and an angel. After he’s health and magical powers were ready, Skellig recovers Michael’s young sister in order to repay Michael’s kindness.

I really enjoyed reading this book and this book is one of my favorite book because this book included mysteries and clues. I really like to read books that really makes me think and guess what is going to happen next. This book was just perfect for me. I could relate this book to myself because the author describes how Michael felt when he had to move to another house and I know how that feels like. I could really agree with Michael and read the book more deeply.
Yianni
Skellig is an imaginative and endearing tale about a boy named Michael who discovers a dying angelic creature lying in the dilapidated shed of his new house. The shocking discovery comes at a time when his infant sister is also dying - suffering complications with her heart. The juxtaposition between these two major events is no coincidence, and we begin to wonder if Michael may be simply imagining the titular character in order to cope with his distress, although it is never implied. Michael sh Skellig is an imaginative and endearing tale about a boy named Michael who discovers a dying angelic creature lying in the dilapidated shed of his new house. The shocking discovery comes at a time when his infant sister is also dying - suffering complications with her heart. The juxtaposition between these two major events is no coincidence, and we begin to wonder if Michael may be simply imagining the titular character in order to cope with his distress, although it is never implied. Michael shares his discovery with only one - Mina, the curious girl across the street (much the dissenter like her idol William Blake) and together they attempt to nurse Skellig back to health. While Skellig may or may not be "something like an angel", it is clear that the real angel in his story is Mina, who opens Michael's mind up to a world of wonder and imagination and ultimately joy. The story uses motifs of birds and quotes by William Blake to further resonate the thematic message that when we release ourselves from the cage that confines us, and become filled with wonder like angels, we rediscover life and we experience joy.
George
Young Michael has a lot on his shoulders -- a recent move to a new house, a terribly sick baby sister. Then there's that strange creature he finds in the garage. Fortunately he meets Mina, the homeschooled, William Blake-quoting girl next door. Skellig is reminiscent of a number of other stories in both its themes and its plot. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Almond works in all sorts of interesting metaphors and ideas -- evolution, education, art and imagination -- although he doesn't alwa Young Michael has a lot on his shoulders -- a recent move to a new house, a terribly sick baby sister. Then there's that strange creature he finds in the garage. Fortunately he meets Mina, the homeschooled, William Blake-quoting girl next door. Skellig is reminiscent of a number of other stories in both its themes and its plot. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Almond works in all sorts of interesting metaphors and ideas -- evolution, education, art and imagination -- although he doesn't always explore or resolve them enough, at least for me. I think he does a good job of portraying Michael, and Michael's reactions to the events and circumstances of his life. There is genuine emotion and listening to Almond's reading highlights this. (As a side note, I really didn't care for the way that he read the character of Skellig, especially during the first half of the book.) I also thought that he captured Michael's relationship with his father and Mina's with her mother very well. I was particularly intrigued by Mina, who was both wise beyond her years and yet still very much a child.
Kayla Edwards
I don't know why this book didn't hit home for me as much as it seems to have done for so many other reviewers, but it wasn't life-alteringly good for me. I liked it, I enjoyed the time I spent reading it, and now I'm done with it. This book introduces us to Michael, a young boy whose baby sister is gravely ill. After the family moves into their new house, Michael finds this strange man in the old, broken-down garage. Michael and his new homeschooled companion, Mina, try their best to nurse Skel I don't know why this book didn't hit home for me as much as it seems to have done for so many other reviewers, but it wasn't life-alteringly good for me. I liked it, I enjoyed the time I spent reading it, and now I'm done with it. This book introduces us to Michael, a young boy whose baby sister is gravely ill. After the family moves into their new house, Michael finds this strange man in the old, broken-down garage. Michael and his new homeschooled companion, Mina, try their best to nurse Skellig back to health and discover who - or what - he is.

I like the play on Creationism vs. Evolution and how beautifully the author portrays that tension. Personally, I was most interested in Mina and desperately want to know more about her - I understand there is another book/novella that deals more with her and I'd like to check it out. This novel is beautifully written and I enjoyed reading it.
✟Roxanne✟(Death by Book Avalanche)
This is just one of those books that stays with you for a long time after reading it as it's so compelling, emotional and so different from other young teen fantasy stories. I remember reading this one in school and very much enjoying it and so when I had the chance to borrow it from a friend and re read it I jumped at the chance as I knew it would take me back to my childhood. The story touches on family issues that may arise in a young persons life that are very difficult to deal with, yet thi This is just one of those books that stays with you for a long time after reading it as it's so compelling, emotional and so different from other young teen fantasy stories. I remember reading this one in school and very much enjoying it and so when I had the chance to borrow it from a friend and re read it I jumped at the chance as I knew it would take me back to my childhood. The story touches on family issues that may arise in a young persons life that are very difficult to deal with, yet this book explores these issues with a sensitive and caring nature but without distorting the truth about how hard those times may be. It allows a young child to escape into fantasy whilst trying to deal with 'grown up' family problems and unexpected illnesses. I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages, even though it is more aimed at younger teens I believe we can all learn something from this book.
Laura Hayes
I remember reading this book as a class when I was in year 5 and I can still remember how vivid the story was told that just left the reader wanting to know more at the end of each chapter. Skellig is about a boy called Michael who had just moved into a new house with his parents, and at the end of the garden there is a derelict shed. Within this shed there is a man living there called Skellig. Skellig is an unknown creature as he looks human but he also has wings on his back. Michael makes frie I remember reading this book as a class when I was in year 5 and I can still remember how vivid the story was told that just left the reader wanting to know more at the end of each chapter. Skellig is about a boy called Michael who had just moved into a new house with his parents, and at the end of the garden there is a derelict shed. Within this shed there is a man living there called Skellig. Skellig is an unknown creature as he looks human but he also has wings on his back. Michael makes friends with his next door neighbour. Together they look after Skellig. It’s a perfect read for children as they would enjoy it being read to them as a class or individually. The story can be told on countless occasions without the class becoming bored. David Almond manages to create a mystical and poetic imagery of the story. I would suggest that this book would be aimed at upper key stage two children depending on the reading ability.
Paula
This book has an intriguing and uplifting story. Everyone can relate to moving home, worrying about a sick loved one and feeling powerless in that situation and everything it entails. Michael discovers a man (Skellig part man part angel) and the adventure and miracles begin.

I read this story with a Primary year 6 class at school and afterwards we watched the movie, I must say that most of the children preferred the book!

They found the story line easy to follow and enjoyed the creativity of expre This book has an intriguing and uplifting story. Everyone can relate to moving home, worrying about a sick loved one and feeling powerless in that situation and everything it entails. Michael discovers a man (Skellig part man part angel) and the adventure and miracles begin.

I read this story with a Primary year 6 class at school and afterwards we watched the movie, I must say that most of the children preferred the book!

They found the story line easy to follow and enjoyed the creativity of expression, for this reason, I have awarded it a high rating.

Classroom: Good for guided reading and classroom shelf . Good to suppport Literacy, in particular creative writing and knowledge retrieval skill - whole-class teaching, speaking and listening sessions.

I would recomend it to others aged 10 – 11
Bethany
It's a book about a boy and a friend, and parents and sickness, and a mystery and a question, and how to be good and how to be brave, and how life can be complicated and simple at the same time.

This was a beautiful, beautiful book. I recommend it to everyone. :)

It is a book for everyone, too, I think. But it's supposedly a children's book. Go ahead, read it and love it, and take your time to enjoy how beautiful it is. And how it says so much about so many things but in such a subtle way.

Loved it It's a book about a boy and a friend, and parents and sickness, and a mystery and a question, and how to be good and how to be brave, and how life can be complicated and simple at the same time.

This was a beautiful, beautiful book. I recommend it to everyone. :)

It is a book for everyone, too, I think. But it's supposedly a children's book. Go ahead, read it and love it, and take your time to enjoy how beautiful it is. And how it says so much about so many things but in such a subtle way.

Loved it. :) I would read it again in a heartbeat. This is the kind of book I want my children to read one day, and I can read it to them and say "Look! See what he just said there? What does that mean? Some people never learn that, so pay attention..."

:) it's very short and easy to read. There is no excuse.
Unforgettable.
Eleanor
Was given this book by a friend, along with lots others (thank you), and this was the first I read. It is a great book, I loved all the characters, except Coot, he was annoying, but my favourite character has to be Mina. The basic story line is that Michael (the head character and narrator)finds strange being in the broken garage that sits beside his new house. He shows Mina and together they help him. While all this is going on, his baby sister is in hospital because of heart problems. Will Mic Was given this book by a friend, along with lots others (thank you), and this was the first I read. It is a great book, I loved all the characters, except Coot, he was annoying, but my favourite character has to be Mina. The basic story line is that Michael (the head character and narrator)finds strange being in the broken garage that sits beside his new house. He shows Mina and together they help him. While all this is going on, his baby sister is in hospital because of heart problems. Will Michael manage to help the strange being, go to school, help his dad on the house and worry about the baby, or will he have to make priorities. I recommend this book to people of around 10+ because it's a bit spooky in places, but it doesn't matter how old you are, you will still be drawn in by the perfectly fleshed out set of characters and the beautiful image behind David Almond's awesome novel!
Hannah
I immediately picked this up to get the bad taste out of my mouth after reading Primates of Park Avenue. It did the trick, as most Carnegie medal winners will.

Michael's world is crumbling around him, just like the new house his parents bought. While his parents spend every hour at the hospital with his dying newborn sister, he finds a decrepit, bug-eating angel in the garage while exploring with a friend.

The book feels rather like Bridge to Terabithia and is ultimately life-affirming.
Peggy
Weird and wonderful. I listened to this one and it was one of those rare find where the author reads and it's magnificant. It is also the first audiobook to make good use of music - the first time I didn't actually find it irritating.

The story... the story was weird and wonderful and I didn't want it to end. I sort of felt like I was there with Michael and Mina and Skellig. The people that surround Michael are kind and he's able to feel his grief very deeply. The contrast between Michael and Mi Weird and wonderful. I listened to this one and it was one of those rare find where the author reads and it's magnificant. It is also the first audiobook to make good use of music - the first time I didn't actually find it irritating.

The story... the story was weird and wonderful and I didn't want it to end. I sort of felt like I was there with Michael and Mina and Skellig. The people that surround Michael are kind and he's able to feel his grief very deeply. The contrast between Michael and Mina and the friendship that grows between them is beautiful.

Naturally not everyone will love this book as much as I did. But it's not a long story and it is available on audio book so I would recommend that you at least give it a chance.
Tash Berbank
I remember reading the beginning of this as a kid, and while I didn't read the whole book, the initial image of Skellig with his beautiful wings, couped up and dusty in a rickety old garage stayed with me, long after I'd forgotten the title of the book. I rediscovered the book at uni and decided to finally read it.
I have to say that the imagery is beautiful. It's such a sensual book and the description is vivid. It really brings the book alive. It's a dark novel done fantastically for children. I remember reading the beginning of this as a kid, and while I didn't read the whole book, the initial image of Skellig with his beautiful wings, couped up and dusty in a rickety old garage stayed with me, long after I'd forgotten the title of the book. I rediscovered the book at uni and decided to finally read it.
I have to say that the imagery is beautiful. It's such a sensual book and the description is vivid. It really brings the book alive. It's a dark novel done fantastically for children.
In addition to this, the story has a great plot and adventure, dealing with quite a difficult themes including the illness of Michael's premature baby sister.
This book is glorious and really one of the best YA novels going around.
Annabel
I would really give it 3 and a half stars if I could! I thought it was interesting how Skellig was part owl, part angel, and half person. I think the conflicts were sort of life and death, and even though some people appear to be blunt, sometimes it takes someone good to find the sweetness inside of him. I think both the baby Joy and Mina did that for Michael, the main character. The reason I'm only giving it 3 stars was because sometimes it got slow and you wanted to skip through some parts. Bu I would really give it 3 and a half stars if I could! I thought it was interesting how Skellig was part owl, part angel, and half person. I think the conflicts were sort of life and death, and even though some people appear to be blunt, sometimes it takes someone good to find the sweetness inside of him. I think both the baby Joy and Mina did that for Michael, the main character. The reason I'm only giving it 3 stars was because sometimes it got slow and you wanted to skip through some parts. But I realized that every word was important, so I tried to read it slowly. The end was so nervewarcking! Very page-turning book.
Ingvild
I don't know what to say. I loved this book. It's minimalistic and full of love, with a vague element of the fantastical. It has birds and poetry and really very good and human characters. It has friendships and emotions that we only scratch the surface of, and then it has emotions that we dive headfirst into. It has beautiful and tender descriptions, and you don't quite understand it, but maybe that's what makes it so enchanting. Don't expect something grand. Expect something quiet and unapolog I don't know what to say. I loved this book. It's minimalistic and full of love, with a vague element of the fantastical. It has birds and poetry and really very good and human characters. It has friendships and emotions that we only scratch the surface of, and then it has emotions that we dive headfirst into. It has beautiful and tender descriptions, and you don't quite understand it, but maybe that's what makes it so enchanting. Don't expect something grand. Expect something quiet and unapologetically odd, that sneaks up on you and surprises you with its charm. Expect little, and receive a lot. But whatever you do, read Skellig.
Lozzi Counsell
Although I have chosen to study writing for children in year two, I wasn't too pleased about the set reading list of books. This is the second book I have had to read for the course and I was so shocked at how amazing it was that I read it within one day! Never again will I be so judgmental on age groups of books. Skellig made for a fascinating, yet exciting read. I feel so much envy about Mina's upbringing; her life honestly sounds so magical and I do wonder if the cover is meant to signify one Although I have chosen to study writing for children in year two, I wasn't too pleased about the set reading list of books. This is the second book I have had to read for the course and I was so shocked at how amazing it was that I read it within one day! Never again will I be so judgmental on age groups of books. Skellig made for a fascinating, yet exciting read. I feel so much envy about Mina's upbringing; her life honestly sounds so magical and I do wonder if the cover is meant to signify one of her paintings. Skellig is a confusing character who has an immense and shocking transformation. I would have liked to have found out how he ended up in the bottom of a shed though!
Tom Franklin
Telling a great story simply is a difficult thing to do. Too often a writer wants to leave his or her mark on the book in obvious ways - too much pretty language, too much overwrought emotion, making too much of the fantastical. David Almond does none of these in SKELLIG. Instead, he chooses to tell his story plainly, giving considerate nods to the emotions and the fantasy elements of his story, without making too much of them. By doing so, he allows the reader to feel the emotions and wonder at Telling a great story simply is a difficult thing to do. Too often a writer wants to leave his or her mark on the book in obvious ways - too much pretty language, too much overwrought emotion, making too much of the fantastical. David Almond does none of these in SKELLIG. Instead, he chooses to tell his story plainly, giving considerate nods to the emotions and the fantasy elements of his story, without making too much of them. By doing so, he allows the reader to feel the emotions and wonder at the fantasy all the more.

SKELLIG is a short book, but one that is rich in texture and mystery. Highly recommended.
Rosemary
I really loved the feeling of this story but there were a few things that didn't quite add up and that always gets to me, resulting in one missing star. (view spoiler)[If Skellig was an angel or some other kind of magical being, then what was all that talk about evolution and why did he eat like an owl? But if he was a differently-evolved non-magical being, how did he help (or even find) the baby in hospital (or appear in the mother's dream, if he wasn't actually there) and how come he spoke Eng I really loved the feeling of this story but there were a few things that didn't quite add up and that always gets to me, resulting in one missing star. (view spoiler)[If Skellig was an angel or some other kind of magical being, then what was all that talk about evolution and why did he eat like an owl? But if he was a differently-evolved non-magical being, how did he help (or even find) the baby in hospital (or appear in the mother's dream, if he wasn't actually there) and how come he spoke English? (hide spoiler)] Ah well, it was very sweet :)
Autumn
I just read Skellig and I am touched beyond words. If you will have the heart, the joy and the tears to read Skellig you will never forget or regret it at all. Smile and wave your hands in the air as David Almond takes you on a roller coaster though the most satisfying book you will ever read. The magic will captivate and the love will touch you. Prepare for your heart's biggest change, Skellig. SKELLIG WILL LEAVE YOU BREATHLESS, HOPEFUL AND WE WILL ALL FLY AWAY WITH A LITTLE PIECE OF SKELLIG IN I just read Skellig and I am touched beyond words. If you will have the heart, the joy and the tears to read Skellig you will never forget or regret it at all. Smile and wave your hands in the air as David Almond takes you on a roller coaster though the most satisfying book you will ever read. The magic will captivate and the love will touch you. Prepare for your heart's biggest change, Skellig. SKELLIG WILL LEAVE YOU BREATHLESS, HOPEFUL AND WE WILL ALL FLY AWAY WITH A LITTLE PIECE OF SKELLIG IN US!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you David Almond.
Love, Autumn
Amaiathe Maori
i thought this book touched my heart i found it interesting when it described skellig in the garage. this book taught me about friendship when mina and borris went through so much together the boy borris was a great character because he had to juggle so mant things and problems with his new school his new baby sister and his new secrete he had to hide from the world which was a hard thing to do with such a busy life.
Ross Kitson
I have no hesitation in giving this 5 stars. I read it with my daughter, prompted by us enjoying Almond's younger books, and we were hooked on the story. The characters are great- well rounded, complex, likeable. The plot and it's sub-texts resonated with us both- themes of friendship, of fears, of trust- and at no point does it patronise it's audience.
It's up there with my fave kids books that adults can enjoy (Alan Garner, Pullman, Rowling, Reeve).
Jade
It's a modern fairytale alright! This was absolutely beautifully written in every way, the plot revolves around a young boy called Michael whose baby sister has an illness affect the whole family. Then he finds skellig, this half human half angel half something creature who shares a hand of kindness to him and his family for helping him regain his strength. Amazing i enjoyed reading it thoroughly
Nancy
Very unique, and hauntingly sweet young adult book. It has a character named Mina, my granddaughter's name, who quotes and speaks about William Blake quite a bit. That hooked me immediately, and the mysterious "man" in the protaganist's garage compelled me to keep reading. I did enjoy it, but don't fully understand some of it.
Molly
I absolutely loved this! It seemed more middle grade than YA to me, though (and we do have it in the children's room at my library rather than the teen stacks). The writing was effortlessly beautiful, and the magic was subtle and wonderful.
Kelly Curran
I just loved this book! Beautiful, optimistic, touching, thought-provoking, heart-warming. Great story, skilful characterisation, poetic prose. READ IT!! YA fiction?? So wrong to limit this - it is truly marvellous, magical realism for ALL :)
Basil Haider
I read it in grade 6 English for school, and re-read it again. It loved it. Looking deeper, you see this great tale of the kids and Skellig himself. Great book. It's short and quick, so you can finish it in one or two sittings
Mike
A beautiful little book, filled with blackbirds and owls and William Blake and a boy with a sick sister and a brilliant neighbor girl and a man with wings. To say more would steal the wonder of discovery and surprise from the reader,
Jason Walsman
Beautiful though quite confusing and mysterious. I think this book is about how much wonder and beauty surrounds us in the rawness of the world itself if we are willing to look a little bit for it. And other deep stuff too but it's hard to explain.
JD Estrada
A novel does not need to be long to have an impact. Good writing doesn't need long sentences. A story is driven by heart and Skellig has an immense heart.

Touching, gentle, dark, mysterious, sad, and odd. Such is life sometimes and such is this read.
Yana Stajno
It's a warmly observed story and has some good things to say about rites of passage. The house, the children, the night and the angle are beautifully drawn. I'm going to give it to all the kids I know. I think they will enjoy it.
Robin
This is a book that I learned about thanks to Nick Hornby's wonderful column in The Believer, and it's just as good as he says. Perfect for older children -- and beautiful for adults.
Tamara
Lovely. We all come from somewhere else, we're all connected if we listen deep enough and imagine just a little, and we're all becoming something else. Divine.
Ainhoa
3'5. Solo puedo decir que es muy bonito y está lleno de cosas bonitas y que me ha gustado mucho <3
Jen
Quick little read with a pretty unique story.
Muamer
This book is about love, faith, life and death. It is also about karma, do good and good things will happen to you. It shows us, how childish hearts are full of love and understanding.
Saeed
This was beautiful in every way. If I was a parent I would read this to my children. I won't say too much but it really blew me away.
Rebecca McNutt
What a weird little book! But Skellig is well-worth it; it was creative, filled with complex characters and a lyrical writing style.
Alma Q
A true favourite for a good couple of years, and therefore one of those books I'm now scared beyond measure to touch again. Re-read I think only once, on March 4, 2012 - but successfully.
Bad
This was a positively wonderful read! A beautiful story. I would recommend it to anyone.
Shaye Miller
I cannot remember where I first heard of Skellig, but I knew it was an older Printz honor book with a long list of other honors and literary awards. The story follows Michael, a 10 year old whose family just moved into an old house that needs a lot of work. Michael’s baby sister was born too early. She’s very sick and may die. They haven’t even named her, just in case. Michael’s neighbor, Mina, is homeschooled. She teaches Michael a great deal about free-range learning and demonstrates a driving I cannot remember where I first heard of Skellig, but I knew it was an older Printz honor book with a long list of other honors and literary awards. The story follows Michael, a 10 year old whose family just moved into an old house that needs a lot of work. Michael’s baby sister was born too early. She’s very sick and may die. They haven’t even named her, just in case. Michael’s neighbor, Mina, is homeschooled. She teaches Michael a great deal about free-range learning and demonstrates a driving passion for discovery as opposed to being “schooled” with lesson plans and assigned activities intended for a large classroom of children.

At lunchtime I went to her front garden. She was sitting there on the lawn, on a spread-out blanket beneath the tree. She had her books, her pencils, her paints scattered around her... “The mystery man,” she said. “Hello again.” She had a book open at a skeleton of a bird. She’d been copying this into her sketchbook. “You’re doing science?” I said. She laughed. “See how school shutters you,” she said. “I’m drawing, painting, reading, looking. I’m feeling the sun and the air on my skin. I’m listening to the blackbird’s song. I’m opening my mind. Ha! School!”

Michael and Mina befriend an unusual being found in Michael’s old garage, and thus begins an attempt to rescue and restore a seemingly wounded spirit. There’s a rare beauty to the writing as Almond weaves in quotes from William Blake throughout the development of Michael’s and Mina’s friendship. I’m still surprised that such a large story was told in so few pages. I easily read it during a family drive on Saturday and I’ve passed it on to my 14 year old in hopes that she’ll breathe in the heart of this book, as I did. After reading Skellig, I am adding Kit’s Wilderness to my TBR list since it took the Printz award for 2001. There’s also a prequel to Skellig called My Name is Mina that I hope to read in the next few months!
Isobel Smith
The book Skellig by David Almond is fascinating as it explains how a boy called Micheal copes with families issues of the premature baby his mother has given birth to. The part of the book that intrigued me was how David Almond used the title Skellig to give the reader an idea of the main character in the story. In the book the character ‘Skellig’ was described as an angel, Mina and Micheal described their first thoughts of Skellig being an angel when they felt his feathery wings in the garage w The book Skellig by David Almond is fascinating as it explains how a boy called Micheal copes with families issues of the premature baby his mother has given birth to. The part of the book that intrigued me was how David Almond used the title Skellig to give the reader an idea of the main character in the story. In the book the character ‘Skellig’ was described as an angel, Mina and Micheal described their first thoughts of Skellig being an angel when they felt his feathery wings in the garage where Skellig stayed.

David Almond tries to betray Skellig’s character as an angel when he becomes strong after the care of Micheal and Mina. He spreads his wings and flys. David Almond then describes Skellig as an angel again when he visits the hospital to see the premature baby to take away with him. The main characters Mina and Micheal were also important in the book as they played an important part of finding out about Skellig by figuring out what kind of creature he was. These characters were my favourite as I enjoyed reading about their determination to help a helpless man (Skellig) that needed someone to care for him ; give him a safe place to stay, giving him food to help him become strong and visiting him regularly in the house they gave him.

I enjoyed the book because I liked the adventure that Micheal and Mina had when exploring interesting facts about Skellig . I also thought the plot idea was excellent ( using Skellig as an angel to collect the premature baby if she was to die). I enjoyed the plot because I thought it was unusual and exciting.
Lynley
I thought it was about time I read this book. I associate it with English department resource rooms.

Not sure how but I managed to know nothing about its content -- I didn't even know it was about a fairy angel type thing. I can see why it's 'good'. It contains all that is good about children's literature. I am not into angel stories. In the arena of adult fiction I've never managed to finish a book by Elizabeth Knox, for instance, even though she is one of New Zealand's big name authors.

Strang I thought it was about time I read this book. I associate it with English department resource rooms.

Not sure how but I managed to know nothing about its content -- I didn't even know it was about a fairy angel type thing. I can see why it's 'good'. It contains all that is good about children's literature. I am not into angel stories. In the arena of adult fiction I've never managed to finish a book by Elizabeth Knox, for instance, even though she is one of New Zealand's big name authors.

Strangely, this story reminded me of a Scottish film in which God is a scruffy old man at the pub. It's a scungy, disturbing film and I don't think I finished watching it. I was also put in mind of Tom's Midnight Garden, though it's harder to say why. I guess the way in which Michael wasn't sure of the distinction between reality and the dream sequences, the sick sibling, the mind-meld which may or may not have been happening between Michael and Mina, as it happened between Tom and the old lady. I was also reminded of Harry Potter's Hermione, though Mina managed to move past the trope of the swotty, controlling girl after a while, perhaps.
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