Dragons of the Dwarven Depths

Written by: Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman

Dragons of the Dwarven Depths Book Cover
Tanis and Flint seek out a haven in the dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin while Raistlin is strangely drawn to the haunted fortress known as Skullcap. Sturm seeks the legendary Hammer of Kharas, and Tika embarks on a perilous journey to rescue those she loves from certain death.

But it is the Dwarf, Flint Fireforge, who faces the most crucial test. The heroes race against time to save the lives of those dependent on them and Flint is forced to make a difficult choice, one on which the future of mankind may rest.
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 70
14
28
23
5
0
Looking for Dragons of the Dwarven Depths in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

Dragons of the Dwarven Depths Reviews

Pata
Este libro lo salvan Tas, que es un amor, y Raistlin, que está sembrado, porque las partes de los enanos [que son casi todas xD] se me hicieron muy pesadas.
Shawn Towner
I haven't read any Dragonlance novels since high school, so I'm going to assume that my memory of them is probably skewed by my love for D&D and the fact that Dragonlance novels were some of the few fiction books that I actually enjoyed reading (the others mostly being Star Wars novels or the novelization of Spaceballs (High school me did not have the best taste in literature)). I doubt the Chronicles and Legends books are as good as I remember them being, so I wasn't expecting much out of D I haven't read any Dragonlance novels since high school, so I'm going to assume that my memory of them is probably skewed by my love for D&D and the fact that Dragonlance novels were some of the few fiction books that I actually enjoyed reading (the others mostly being Star Wars novels or the novelization of Spaceballs (High school me did not have the best taste in literature)). I doubt the Chronicles and Legends books are as good as I remember them being, so I wasn't expecting much out of Dragons of the Dwarven Depths.

The events of the novel take place in between the first two Chronicles books. The companions have liberated Pax Tharkas and are trying to find a safe haven for the refugees. The best option would seem to be Thorbardin, the closed-off kingdom of the Dwarves. So they first need to find the place (help which Flint reluctantly provides) and gain entrance into the kingdom (which comes courtesy of Raistlin and Sturm). Much of what happens in the novel might not be all that interesting for people who haven't read the Chronicles or Legends series. There are references to Huma, the Silver Arm, and Fistandatilus that could be interesting to those of us who've read other Dragonlance novels, but would probably be confusing to those who are just beginning to read into the series.

If you've read and enjoyed other Dragonlance novels, then Dwarven Depths is an interesting, if somewhat underwhelming, read. I liked the way it presented the shaky alliance between Raistlin and Sturm, highlighting the distrust/distaste they have for each other, while still demonstrating why such differing personalities are able to coexist so successfully. It also adds detail to Draconian society and their desired role in the armies of the Dark Queen. It's certainly not as good as I remember Chronicles or Legends (or even the Legend of Huma book) being, but it was a nice way to return to the stories of Krynn.
Nathan
Published a ways after the Chronicles books, but threaded through them -- and, happily, written by Weis and Hickman unlike the bulk of so-called Dragonlance books out there -- this book is read directly after Chronicles Book 1, Dragons of Autumn Twilight. It tells the tale of what happened after Pax Tharkas but before Tarsis, and explains how the refugees and the Companions got to Thorbardin, which had been explained away by a few brief expositional paragraphs in the beginning of Chronicles Book Published a ways after the Chronicles books, but threaded through them -- and, happily, written by Weis and Hickman unlike the bulk of so-called Dragonlance books out there -- this book is read directly after Chronicles Book 1, Dragons of Autumn Twilight. It tells the tale of what happened after Pax Tharkas but before Tarsis, and explains how the refugees and the Companions got to Thorbardin, which had been explained away by a few brief expositional paragraphs in the beginning of Chronicles Book 2.

I generally enjoyed this one. Nothing amazing, and a tiny bit contrived with the plotting of Dray-yan and Grag, but overall pretty good, and it satisfied that niggling curiosity about how the refugees got to Thorbardin, and what happened with the Hammer of Kharas, and where Tas found the Glasses of Arcanist.

I had thought these Lost Chronicles books were interspersed evenly between the Chronicles novels, so after this one I re-read Chronicles Book 2. However when I then went on to read Lost Chronicles Book 2, Dragons of the Highlord Skies, I found that the first half of it happened before Chronicles Book 2, and the rest happened simultaneously. So after this one, read Lost Chronicles Book 2, Dragons of the Highlord Skies. Then Chronicles Book 2, and so on.

Looking back after having read all the Lost Chronicles, I think this is the best of the series.
Realms of Dragons: The Universes of Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman :: Nightsword :: The Abhorsen Trilogy Box Set :: The Seventh Tower :: The War of the Lance
Conan Tigard
I absolutely loved Dragons of the Dwarven Depths by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. It has been a few years since I read a DragonLance book and I had forgotten how much I loved this world. Now, this book takes place during the original Chronicles trilogy, which I have not read. It takes place between Dragons of Autumn Twilight and Dragons and Winter Night. Did it matter that I had never read the two books that this story takes place between? No, not at all.

Dragons of the Dwarven Depths is basi I absolutely loved Dragons of the Dwarven Depths by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. It has been a few years since I read a DragonLance book and I had forgotten how much I loved this world. Now, this book takes place during the original Chronicles trilogy, which I have not read. It takes place between Dragons of Autumn Twilight and Dragons and Winter Night. Did it matter that I had never read the two books that this story takes place between? No, not at all.

Dragons of the Dwarven Depths is basically a stand-alone story. It is the untold tale of how Flint and the others search for the Hammer of Kharas, the struggle of the refugees to survive draconian attacks, and the opening of Thorbardin to the world. Having read the Legends trilogy and the Lost Chronicles trilogy, I knew that this story had to take place before any of those. As for the story itself, it is awesome. The action is non-stop and the plot development is tremendous.

This is the best DragonLance book I have ever read and it has made me very excited to read more. Tasslehoff "Tas" Burrfoot continues to be my favorite DragonLance character and I hope that one day Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman will do an entire series where he is the main character.

Overall, Dragons of the Dwarven Depths is a spectacular story in the DragonLance world and should not be missed by anyone who loves Fantasy. I cannot wait to see what other lost story the authors have come up with in the second book of the Lost Chronicles series entitled Dragons of the Highlord Skies. I bet that it will be terrific.

I rated this book a 9½ out of 10.
Louis Vigo
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It had been awhile since I read a Dragonlance novel and it was quit refreshing to do so again. Its not heavy reading, but being thought out it has just enough to chew on intellectually to satisfy the desire for a fun read.

One of the ideas that popped out at me was how non-pagan the gods of Krynn seem to be (other than their multiplicity). I wonder if that is in part to Hickman being Mormon? The gods of Krynn produce a setting quite different from Forgotten Realms I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It had been awhile since I read a Dragonlance novel and it was quit refreshing to do so again. Its not heavy reading, but being thought out it has just enough to chew on intellectually to satisfy the desire for a fun read.

One of the ideas that popped out at me was how non-pagan the gods of Krynn seem to be (other than their multiplicity). I wonder if that is in part to Hickman being Mormon? The gods of Krynn produce a setting quite different from Forgotten Realms or many other modern fantasy novels (that I've read) since there is a morality based value system derived from Judeo-Christian theology that underlies the story

The main plot of the story places deontology against consequentialism. It asks the age old question, does the end justify the means? Can you commit a wrong to make a right? And with holding to Krynn's idealistic value system it answers it accordingly.

In a more Machiavellian world the end justifies the means, and its the strong that survive, and man is at the center of the universe existing for his own gratification at the expense of others. Which accurately describes Queen Takhisis and her minions, as well as Satan.

Of course our own world isnt quite that simple, and idealistic values dont work all the time. Still it's good to be inspired and shoot for the stars.
John Stephens
The early days of fantasy literature, in my world, went something like this.

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe (followed by a few more of those books)
The Hobbit (followed by a few more of those books, which I don't enjoy anymore, but that's a different review)
Dragonlance Chronicles

The last one is huge. Thanks to Margaret and Tracy I fell in love with fantasy, and they led me to RA Salvatore, Mercedes Lackey, and a host of other authors I love today.

But, let's talk about this book! Somehow the The early days of fantasy literature, in my world, went something like this.

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe (followed by a few more of those books)
The Hobbit (followed by a few more of those books, which I don't enjoy anymore, but that's a different review)
Dragonlance Chronicles

The last one is huge. Thanks to Margaret and Tracy I fell in love with fantasy, and they led me to RA Salvatore, Mercedes Lackey, and a host of other authors I love today.

But, let's talk about this book! Somehow there were three Chronicles books I didn't know about? Seriously, how was this book written ten years ago and I just found out about it in September of 2016? I don't know, but I'm so very glad I discovered it. It was amazing to spend time with Tanis and Flint again, with Sturm and Tas, Raist and Caramon. It was awesome to experience the hunt for Thorbardin and the machinations of the Draconians in the wake of Lord V's death at Pax Tharkas.

It was just awesome to spend time with these characters again. I'll be reading the second book very shortly.
Marco Vaca
This was a journey into my fond Krynn memories...

It was fun to travel again with The Companions. The book itself is good, though not as good as the original two trilogies (you should know the "Legends" trilogy is still one of my favorite books ever). The story seems plausible, though to be honest I don't remember the exact details of the sojourn to Pax Tharkas.

Should you read this book? Well, it depends on two things: Do you like the Dragonlance setting? If so, you should DEFINITELY read the two This was a journey into my fond Krynn memories...

It was fun to travel again with The Companions. The book itself is good, though not as good as the original two trilogies (you should know the "Legends" trilogy is still one of my favorite books ever). The story seems plausible, though to be honest I don't remember the exact details of the sojourn to Pax Tharkas.

Should you read this book? Well, it depends on two things: Do you like the Dragonlance setting? If so, you should DEFINITELY read the two original trilogies first. The other one: Have you read the original two trilogies RECENTLY? If so, pick this one up! It'll be fun. Otherwise, you should only check this out if you like "light" fantasy.

Finally, I think the more I read the Dragonlance books the more I change my opinion of some of the Companions; I like Flint MORE in this book, and I like (amazingly) Raistlin and Caramon much less. And I've only read the Weiss/Hickman novels so it’s NOT about the authors.

Fun book. Let’s see how the other two fare... later this year.
Joseph
Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman

I've always liked Fantasy novels and especially ones about D&D. This story doesn't disappoint, It's not my favorite D&D novel, but I like the characters especially Tanis, Flynt, and Caramon. If you like D&D novels or sword and sorcery fantasy I would suggest you read this. Dragons of Dwarven depths gives you plenty of action, magic and character interaction. This is a great adventure. This is not really a book for you if you don't like fantasy, or hig Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman

I've always liked Fantasy novels and especially ones about D&D. This story doesn't disappoint, It's not my favorite D&D novel, but I like the characters especially Tanis, Flynt, and Caramon. If you like D&D novels or sword and sorcery fantasy I would suggest you read this. Dragons of Dwarven depths gives you plenty of action, magic and character interaction. This is a great adventure. This is not really a book for you if you don't like fantasy, or high magic.

I listened to this as an audiobook narrated by Sandra Burr. Her narration was good, she does a good job of creating different voices for the characters and sticking to them with only a few lapses in voice or accent. But overall the audio book is well read and fast paced so I would suggest if you want something to listen to while driving, riding to work/ school, or working pick up this book.
Richard
Set between the first and second book of the original trilogy, this book details who the companions and the refugees travel to the city of the dwarfs and the adventures they have there.

The story is excellent and very full considering it covers what is a relatively short amount of time in the series. It gives a good amount of reminders so if it has been a while since you have read the original trilogy you won't have a problem diving back into the story.

The characters are excellent with the dynami Set between the first and second book of the original trilogy, this book details who the companions and the refugees travel to the city of the dwarfs and the adventures they have there.

The story is excellent and very full considering it covers what is a relatively short amount of time in the series. It gives a good amount of reminders so if it has been a while since you have read the original trilogy you won't have a problem diving back into the story.

The characters are excellent with the dynamic interaction between Flint and Tas being one of the best but Sturm, Raistlin and Caramon are excellent too. It was really nice to see characters who didn't make it though the original books, and it was also nice to see the characters knowing where they end up. One problem with this was that you knew all the characters would survive this book at they would be successful in their quest.

Overall an excellent story with awesome characters, and a great fill in book for the series.
CB
So, it turns out I've already read this one! This series came recommended by a student, and when I picked the first one up this weekend, I remembered walking this particular path once before. These books are good fun and a real blast from the past for me. The original Dragonlance chronicles were the first 'big kid' books I ever read, the first ones I checked out from the YA section in the old Bel Air library. Every once in a great while, I go back to them. This newer series takes place during th So, it turns out I've already read this one! This series came recommended by a student, and when I picked the first one up this weekend, I remembered walking this particular path once before. These books are good fun and a real blast from the past for me. The original Dragonlance chronicles were the first 'big kid' books I ever read, the first ones I checked out from the YA section in the old Bel Air library. Every once in a great while, I go back to them. This newer series takes place during the empty spaces between books. A lot happens in those spaces and reading Dwarven Depths filled in the gap between books 1 and 2 in a comfortable way. Weis & Hickman were landmark in defining this genre, and they are in fine form once again. Of course, twenty years on, this book feels somewhat predictable, but is still a good example of high fantasy.
Michael Tildsley
It has been a long time since I've read anything in the Dragonlance series of Weis and Hickman. In fact, I've owned this book for a long time, but put off reading it because the trilogy wasn't finished at the time of purchase. Suffice it to say, the series is reborn in my mind through this book, though I'm not entirely sure of the chronology of the Lost Chronicles series just yet. I think this first falls somewhere after the first book in the original series, but after that I'll have to check. I It has been a long time since I've read anything in the Dragonlance series of Weis and Hickman. In fact, I've owned this book for a long time, but put off reading it because the trilogy wasn't finished at the time of purchase. Suffice it to say, the series is reborn in my mind through this book, though I'm not entirely sure of the chronology of the Lost Chronicles series just yet. I think this first falls somewhere after the first book in the original series, but after that I'll have to check. It was a fun experience reading about familiar characters (whose outcomes I now know) from a developmental perspective. I wasn't particularly thrilled with the ending of this volume, but I am excited at the prospect or reading the next. Then again, I guess that's what every successful part one is supposed to do: sell part two.
Robert
This was a good story. A dungeon delve told from 3 different angles... until the end when they just hand waved over the Riverwind/Refugee group's progress. The book mostly focuses on Flint, which I very much enjoyed. I love dwarves and Flint is different then the hard charging, drunk, Gimli-esque trope you see in most fantasy novels. I thought Weis did an excellent job scaling back the characters to make them read like the young, novice adventurers that they were at the end of Dragons of Autumn This was a good story. A dungeon delve told from 3 different angles... until the end when they just hand waved over the Riverwind/Refugee group's progress. The book mostly focuses on Flint, which I very much enjoyed. I love dwarves and Flint is different then the hard charging, drunk, Gimli-esque trope you see in most fantasy novels. I thought Weis did an excellent job scaling back the characters to make them read like the young, novice adventurers that they were at the end of Dragons of Autumn Twilight. It seemed a bit long at times, literally repeating scenes at a couple of points. If you've read all the other books and liked them, I'd recommend it. If you are starting the series, I would say read the books in universe chronology, that is, read Autumn Twilight, then read this trilogy, then continue with Dragons of Winter Night.
Ashley
This is the first book in the "Lost Chronicles" trilogy. I reread the books from the beginning, and read this trilogy inbetween the original trilogy. This book filled in the blanks that there was between the first and second book of the original Chronicles.

The story itself was pretty good, and quite captivating. Not my favorite one of the enitre series, but still really good. It explains how all of the characters get to where they are by the start of the next book. All the different dwarves tha This is the first book in the "Lost Chronicles" trilogy. I reread the books from the beginning, and read this trilogy inbetween the original trilogy. This book filled in the blanks that there was between the first and second book of the original Chronicles.

The story itself was pretty good, and quite captivating. Not my favorite one of the enitre series, but still really good. It explains how all of the characters get to where they are by the start of the next book. All the different dwarves that live under the mountain and all of the adventures that they have under this huge mountain. I LOVE flint and tasselhoff :) and as always the twins provide that conflict that makes the books more real-like.
David Zerangue
It was nice to revisit the world that kicked off my introduction to fantasy. While the writing is not the most artistic or eloquent and the editing is less than optimal, it was a pleasure to return to the storytelling by the original authors.
The books are a little different in that they act more like fillers to the original Chronicles. If you have not read the original series from the mid 1980s, you will be lost. And I must admit the original books were probably much more charming at the age of It was nice to revisit the world that kicked off my introduction to fantasy. While the writing is not the most artistic or eloquent and the editing is less than optimal, it was a pleasure to return to the storytelling by the original authors.
The books are a little different in that they act more like fillers to the original Chronicles. If you have not read the original series from the mid 1980s, you will be lost. And I must admit the original books were probably much more charming at the age of 11 rather than my current 'seasoned' age. Still, I'll probably pull out the original series when I retire and revisit Krynn from the beginning.
For those of you that have Dragonlance in your memory banks, the Lost Chronicles will be a pleasant return.
Rebecca Stayman
Really liked this book. It would be best to read it between the books, 'dragons of autumn twilight' and 'Dragons of winter's night' from the Dragonlance Chronicles. If you really like the Dragonlance Chronicles then this series is fun to pair with it. I wouldn't recommend reading this book without first meeting all the characters in 'Dragons of Autumn Twilight' though.
This is my favorite of the Lost Chronicles. Mostly because it touches on all the companions and tells the story of what happened Really liked this book. It would be best to read it between the books, 'dragons of autumn twilight' and 'Dragons of winter's night' from the Dragonlance Chronicles. If you really like the Dragonlance Chronicles then this series is fun to pair with it. I wouldn't recommend reading this book without first meeting all the characters in 'Dragons of Autumn Twilight' though.
This is my favorite of the Lost Chronicles. Mostly because it touches on all the companions and tells the story of what happened with them between the autumn and the winter book. The next two are good but they only deal with background stories that were left out of the Dragonlance series. They tell about things that were happening while the companions were moving about on their journeys through Ansalon.
Natalia
I couldn't quite believe that this is a book written by the authors of the ever-wonderful Dragonlance Chronicles. I really wanted to love it, as if to prolong living in the world of Dragonlance but... there was something missing. I found writing to be a little, let's say, too simple, the portrayal of the world a bit shallow. The dialogues lacked a certain depth and events were presented in a in-your-face manner, without leaving much for readers to discover, inquire or guess. Everything was just I couldn't quite believe that this is a book written by the authors of the ever-wonderful Dragonlance Chronicles. I really wanted to love it, as if to prolong living in the world of Dragonlance but... there was something missing. I found writing to be a little, let's say, too simple, the portrayal of the world a bit shallow. The dialogues lacked a certain depth and events were presented in a in-your-face manner, without leaving much for readers to discover, inquire or guess. Everything was just so simple and predictable. Quite enjoyable at times, I won't deny, but just as much disappointing.

It's not a bad book per se, but I expected someting more than just "not bad".
Jim
I'm not sure why I wasn't quite as into this book as I was into the Dragonlance Chronicles when I first read them. Maybe because it wasn't quite a standalone story but tells the story between two of the books of the original trilogy. Maybe because I read the original books 25 years ago. (Has it been that long?) Maybe because I got it as an audiobook, and the reader was less than proficient. Normally I prefer women readers, but the dialogue was 90% male, which made a woman an odd choice. Plus she I'm not sure why I wasn't quite as into this book as I was into the Dragonlance Chronicles when I first read them. Maybe because it wasn't quite a standalone story but tells the story between two of the books of the original trilogy. Maybe because I read the original books 25 years ago. (Has it been that long?) Maybe because I got it as an audiobook, and the reader was less than proficient. Normally I prefer women readers, but the dialogue was 90% male, which made a woman an odd choice. Plus she made Tasslehoff sound like a Muppet. And sometimes old woman.

Anyway, the book was enjoyable enough, but not as wonderful as I remember the series to be.
Gokce
Companions are back!! Well I might be pretty late to read this series but I am so happy that I've decided to. This book not only tells the untold stories happened during The War of the Lances but also has the same humour, excitement and drama with the original series.

It was a priceless journey deep into the Kharolis Mountains, into Thorbardin, discovering the dwarven races and the conflicts between each other. A must read if you are a Dragonlance fan, but take caution that it might include some Companions are back!! Well I might be pretty late to read this series but I am so happy that I've decided to. This book not only tells the untold stories happened during The War of the Lances but also has the same humour, excitement and drama with the original series.

It was a priceless journey deep into the Kharolis Mountains, into Thorbardin, discovering the dwarven races and the conflicts between each other. A must read if you are a Dragonlance fan, but take caution that it might include some spoilers about the original series. So my suggestion would be to read the original series first (Chronicles trilogy), then start with this book to explore more about the companions.
Batsap
I was a couple of pages into this before I realised that I'd read it before. I don't tend to reread books, but I made an exception for this one. I like the innocence of the Dragonlance books, there is something honest and open about them that has kept its appeal since I was young. Reading about the characters made me feel like I was visiting old friends, able to pick up where we had left off even though I hadn't seen them in years. It was especially nice to see Raistlin and Tas again. I also lov I was a couple of pages into this before I realised that I'd read it before. I don't tend to reread books, but I made an exception for this one. I like the innocence of the Dragonlance books, there is something honest and open about them that has kept its appeal since I was young. Reading about the characters made me feel like I was visiting old friends, able to pick up where we had left off even though I hadn't seen them in years. It was especially nice to see Raistlin and Tas again. I also love Weis and Hickman's humour, it feels effortless and un-selfconscious. Dragonlance books can always make me smile.
Jaime K
The original Companions have more to their story than told before. After the death of Verminaard, a draconian named Dray-yan comes up with a scheme to pose as the High Lord. Tanis and the others are determined to lead a troupe of refugees to safety; Tanis and Flint head to the dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin, and Raistlin, Sturm & Caramon go on their own quest to find the Hammer of Kharas.

This is mainly about Tas and Flint, how kender are more awesome than others realize, and on how different The original Companions have more to their story than told before. After the death of Verminaard, a draconian named Dray-yan comes up with a scheme to pose as the High Lord. Tanis and the others are determined to lead a troupe of refugees to safety; Tanis and Flint head to the dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin, and Raistlin, Sturm & Caramon go on their own quest to find the Hammer of Kharas.

This is mainly about Tas and Flint, how kender are more awesome than others realize, and on how different dwarf sects operate.
Anastasia
Well, perhaps it will never be a great classic, but Dragons of the Dwarven Depths does allow those of us with near obsessive devotion to the Dragonlance sequence to finally see a few more pieces to the puzzle filled in. As the companions split up on various quests in a post Dragons of Autumn Twilight world there are a number of interesting consequences: Sturm possessed by a dead Dwarven prince, Raistlin moving down the path of evil. The story won't stand up to the original series, but it's nice Well, perhaps it will never be a great classic, but Dragons of the Dwarven Depths does allow those of us with near obsessive devotion to the Dragonlance sequence to finally see a few more pieces to the puzzle filled in. As the companions split up on various quests in a post Dragons of Autumn Twilight world there are a number of interesting consequences: Sturm possessed by a dead Dwarven prince, Raistlin moving down the path of evil. The story won't stand up to the original series, but it's nice to have the true authors returning to their world and expanding the vision.
Christel Mirassou
As other old-time fantasy geeks know, the original chronicles seemed to skip a rather large amount of time between books. It was obvious important things happened but they were only talked about in retrospect. The lost chronicles deal with those stories.

Finally, we know what happened!

About to the fifth chapter of the Dwarven Depths. Already I'm intrigued by the cherished characters I loved from the originals. Their personalities are far more developed, and IT...IS...AWESOME.

I'll post a full revi As other old-time fantasy geeks know, the original chronicles seemed to skip a rather large amount of time between books. It was obvious important things happened but they were only talked about in retrospect. The lost chronicles deal with those stories.

Finally, we know what happened!

About to the fifth chapter of the Dwarven Depths. Already I'm intrigued by the cherished characters I loved from the originals. Their personalities are far more developed, and IT...IS...AWESOME.

I'll post a full review when I'm done.

Cheers,

sid.
Lana
great book, fills in some interesting gaps which previous books left!! some of these later reads might be a bit repetitive but since i am enjoying them so much i don't find this a bother at all! its great to meet flint and tas together again, not so great to see raistlin bully cameron but seems that things never change!! looking forward to reading about the two women in the half elvin's life, both strong in their different ways!! kitiara the dragon lord of the dark side and laurana the elf of qu great book, fills in some interesting gaps which previous books left!! some of these later reads might be a bit repetitive but since i am enjoying them so much i don't find this a bother at all! its great to meet flint and tas together again, not so great to see raistlin bully cameron but seems that things never change!! looking forward to reading about the two women in the half elvin's life, both strong in their different ways!! kitiara the dragon lord of the dark side and laurana the elf of qualinisti and the side of light!!
Colin
The first volume of the "Lost Chronicles" fills in a gap in the original chronicles - in the original, there is a sudden leap from the liberation of the enslaved people at Pax Tharkas to the refugees living in the formerly-inaccessible dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin. There is dialogue like, "Now that we have unsealed the gates to Thorbardin and convinced the dwarves to help us by finding the lost Hammer of Kharas, now we can . . ." Right. So, this "lost chronicle tells the story of how that happ The first volume of the "Lost Chronicles" fills in a gap in the original chronicles - in the original, there is a sudden leap from the liberation of the enslaved people at Pax Tharkas to the refugees living in the formerly-inaccessible dwarven kingdom of Thorbardin. There is dialogue like, "Now that we have unsealed the gates to Thorbardin and convinced the dwarves to help us by finding the lost Hammer of Kharas, now we can . . ." Right. So, this "lost chronicle tells the story of how that happened, filling in the blanks in the story, as it were . . .
Kurtbg
More tales of the companions. If you're read the dragon chronicles and are familiar with Tanis, Caramon, Tas & Raistlin, then continue in, as you will enjoy the continued (or should I say past) stories of these characters. Strangely enough the authors wrote a 3 book series and left gaping holes in the story lines for some weird reason. This 3 book series is the authors fix to a late 80's series written about 20 years later. Very odd.
Gretchen Alice
Uggghhhh, this book. My husband suggested I read the series (both the regular Dragonlance Chronicles and the Lost Chronicles) in chronological order, but that may have been a mistake. Nothing happened for the first half of this book and then things got a little exciting, only to get boring again. The last fourth was by far the most interesting part, but hardly any of the build-up was necessary. Also, all three of the cool fantasy ladies from the first book were barely in this. Bored now.
Addie LeMaster
This was a great read. I loved the way it explained things that were left out of the original Chronicles due to this being a "lost story". I loved how it really focused on Flint too and explained more of him which in turn helped me to understand him more in the other books. It is best to read this book after you read Chronicles and Legends. DLNexus has a great reading order suggestion that I strongly suggest following when it comes to the series.
Brian
A very enjoyable read for me. I was a pre-teen when the orginal Dragonlance series came out and have been a huge fan ever since. This book was a good read but I am biased and probably not a good judge of whether its a good book. I do know that if you are a fan of the original series and any of the Dragonlance novels written by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman then you will be a fan of this as well. I re-read the whole series as much as possible.
April-lyn
Enjoyed the story thoroughly as another addition to the history of Krynn and the companions, but dear gods the writing was bad. Did they even HAVE an editor? Tenses changed midparagraph, narration style changed for no apparent reason, and I think there were at least a few typos. Were all the Dragonlance books this badly written and I never noticed? Or was this just a sloppy addition to the series?
Ted Reed
Unlike the later books of the Lost Chronicles trilogy, this book mostly avoids spoilers and does fit pretty neatly between the end of Dragons of Autumn Twilight and the beginning of Dragons of Winter Night.

The beginning felt a little weird to me, but as it went in, things dropped right into the familiar old groove. It explains lots of little things, some of which lead pretty well into parts Dragons of the Highlord Skies.
David
It's been a long time since I have read the original books and I almost put this one down as it seemed to start slowly. About half way through it finally took me and I wanted to finish it and continue with the series. It has also made me think I should go back and read the original series as well.
Lynette
I have loved the
Dragonlance series ever since I started reading itmany years ago. Though it is not as long or complex as some fantasy series, it still ranks as one of my favourites. I was not disappointed when I read Dragons Of The Dwarven Depths; all of the original beloved characters are back in true fine form. I'm looking for more of the lost chronicles in epub or audio formats.
Amos
Returned to Lawrence Library. Found hard to get started but half way through became interested in characters and finally finished.

Flint became the hero of this story. Good escape literature with definite juvenile leanings. Dragon title should make the subject matter fairly obvious immediately.

don't expect to check out again.
Jeffrey
I was disappointed with this book. I felt like it was very forced. All of the characters that I loved in the Chronicles, were written as caractitures of the real thing. Tas was written too obviously as the funny one, Tanis the serious one, and etc. It wasn't natural dialouge even. Just didn't care for it, and probably won't read the rest of them in this series.
Ben
This book was confusing - even for a low-grade fantasy novel. Dealt with the characters of the original Dragonlance: Chronicles series and their adventures in between the first and second book. Characters dull, not what they were like in original books. And the writing style is stale. Maybe I'm just off of fantasy - who knows.
Scott Block
When I saw this on the bookshelf I almost started it right then and there! I loved the War of the Lance series and the group of companions and I couldn't wait to get more! This trilogy was very cleverly done for it fills in some of the gaps that were not explained in the original series and tells a story of things that occurred that we're eluded to but not explained.
Kevin
Great for fans of Flint, but the additional subplot with the draconians and the refugees felt like filler because the Hammer of Kharas story was not long enough to fill a novel. Like many prequels, they added in too many hints about the future stories (Legends) which serve no purpose. The insights it gives into the characters, particularly Flint is interesting, but not necessary.
Elar
You can feel that book is written by original authors of Dragonlance saga and elaborates on many details which are references by other books as historic events. This time Raistlin's brother Caramon is depicted almost as moron and it really reduces connection to other books and disturbs reading/listening.
Kurt Vosper
What happened between the books of the legendary trilogy? This is essentially the prequel to the first Dragonlance and then the next two fit between books 1-2 and 2-3. Essentially turns the trilogy into a six-parter.
Jason Zimdars
I seem to remember the original books being better written and the characters felt just a little "off" – cartoons of the originals that I loved as a kid. Could be just my poor memory. Either way it was a fun jaunt back in the world of Krynn. I intend to re-read the orignal Chronicles trilogy next.
Nicolas Romalidis
It's just i like the dwarves very and as the title say the story take place in the dwarven kingdom.Chronically it's been played between the first and the second book of the dragonlance chronicles.Nothing breathtaking but a fun way to pass the time.
Eternal
A friend introduced this book to me and said i would like it and he was right. It was a lil confusing at first but that's only because this one of the last 3 books to this series. Once i started to read i couldn't put it down. I couldn't wait for the next 1: Dragons of the Highlord Skies. Vol. II
Brenda
I love the Dragonlance series and reading this was like visiting old friends. It is your classic dungeons and dragons fantasy novel that is my favorite escape. Looking forward to reading the next two books.
Tim Dunn
Another set of characters i hadn't read about in a while....and this was a very good way to get back into them. Weiss and Hickman continue to prove why they virtually "own" this genre. Fantastic novel, fast paced and I'm looking forward to reading the next one soon.
Tommy
I read this book because I had no other options at the time. It passed the time, but wasn't good. I'm sorry Casey, it's how I feel. I'm just not into dragons and orcs or whatever like you are. We're allowed to have separate tastes. Are you mad now?
Rob
Following on from Autumn Twilight, this sees our heroes negotiate with the Dwarves of Thorbadin. But treachery lurks below ground as well as above. A good read, but not as pacey as the Chronicles are, fills in the gap between Autumn Twilight and Winter Night nicely though.
Reflector
So good to return to these characters. Like old friends talking of the good old days, this book brings back a lot of what I love about these characters. I would of like a bit more from Rast but maybe book 2 will have more on him.
Kasper
As a kid, I plunged through about 20 Dragonlance books, and starting to read The Lost Chronicles - which adds to the tales of The Companions - is the perfect way to return to Krynn. Still love these characters.
Charles Veselsky
It was nice coming back to the familiar characters from Chronicles and reading about adventures that were glossed over in the original trilogy. The authors' writing has definitely improved over the years as well. If you're a fan of the setting then you should definitely read this series as well.
Neville Ridley-smith
Answers the question - what happened between the first two books. It was covered in the D&D modules but skipped over when the original chronicles were published.

Stays true to the flavour of those original books and remains enjoyable!
Chris Smith
Finally I find out what happened in Thorbardin between books 1 and 2. Very satisifying.
Cooksonmom
3.5. Great to be back in the world of Krynn. Solid book, just as this is a 'lost' chapter the scope was limited for the authors due to it being a story placed between the originals.
Tonya
The characters seemed different from the original chronicles, but still pretty good
Stacey
there is nothing I don't love about all these DL books by Weis Hickman
Derek Brown
Decent way to revisit the most beloved fantasy characters from the world of Krynn. But you can't go home again. First in the series.
Leon
it's refreshing to read the companions adventure. Kinda excited to read the 2nd Lost Chronicles book.
Marc
In this series the authors are filling in the gaps in their successful DragonLance series (which is interesting because its something I complained about at the time). It's OK, but not great
Amber
An awesome book for hardcore Dragonlance fans (myself obviously included). Felt just like another Chronicles book, although with a smaller scope.
Erdem Karaadam
great book to get you back in series. consistent with other chronicles.
Terry
Really brought me back into what I loved about the series. Not as good as the original Chronicles but a pretty good reminder of it and not a bad story either.
Girish Mani
My first dragonlance book. Good book with magnificient storyline.
Tom Britton
The Companions are back like slipping in a old pair of shoes

great to see the back

still laught my head over tass and flint
Fenris
Almost as good as the Chronicles! I would recommend this book (1st in a trilogy) to anyone who was seriously disappointed by the War of Souls Trilogy. (like myself...)
Cferjani
it is great reading about the Companions again I loved it
Adam
its good to be back with the companions again.
Kane Fedde
Not as good as the original Chronicles, but I'm still a crying mess at the end of it.
Jeff Krodel
Would have been better had I read them in order...
Layne
This book is full of suspense, battles, betrayal, and the best of all, DWARVEN DEPTHS. I would reccomend this book to everyone who likes a really good tale.
Mike
A lost dragonlance tale that is poorly told. This book makes some continuity problems but does emplain what happened between Chronicles 1 and 2
Nbbecker
A continuation of a series I read as a kid. Fun times.
Leave Feeback for Dragons of the Dwarven Depths
Useful Links