Vol. 1, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Written by: Alan Moore, Kevin O'Neill

Vol. 1, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Book Cover
London, 1898. The Victorian Era draws to a close and the twentieth century approaches. It is a time of great change and an age of stagnation, a period of chaste order and ignoble chaos. It is an era in need of champions.

In this amazingly imaginative tale, literary figures from throughout time and various bodies of work are brought together to face any and all threats to Britain. Allan Quatermain, Mina Murray, Captain Nemo, Dr. Henry Jekyll and Edward Hyde and Hawley Griffin ( the Invisible Man) form a remarkable legion of intellectual aptitude and physical prowess: The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
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Vol 1 The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Reviews

Kevin Xu
only if this really have happened, how cool would that really be
Timothy Boyd
Great story. The characters are nowhere near the neat clean versions the movie makes them out to be. Very recommended
Javier Muñoz
Todo un homenaje de Moore a la literatura clásica de misterio y aventuras. El de Northampton toma elementos y personajes de novelas y relatos fantásticos del siglo XIX y principios del siglo XX (Mina Harker, Allan Quatermain, el doctor Jekill, el hombre invisible, el capitán Nemo) y les da un toque más gamberro y loco para dar forma a una aventura entretenida e intrascendente.

Lo mejor de este cómic es la atmósfera que crea Kevin O'neill, el Londres de la época victoriana, los muelles y embarcaci Todo un homenaje de Moore a la literatura clásica de misterio y aventuras. El de Northampton toma elementos y personajes de novelas y relatos fantásticos del siglo XIX y principios del siglo XX (Mina Harker, Allan Quatermain, el doctor Jekill, el hombre invisible, el capitán Nemo) y les da un toque más gamberro y loco para dar forma a una aventura entretenida e intrascendente.

Lo mejor de este cómic es la atmósfera que crea Kevin O'neill, el Londres de la época victoriana, los muelles y embarcaciones a una escala exagerada, el east end londinense convertido en un barrio chino, las extrañas armas y artefactos, los diseños de los personajes y su vestuario...

Al final del libro tenemos un relato escrito que cuenta una aventura protagonizada por Allan Quatermain, junto con john Carter, su sobrino y el viajero en el tiempo del libro de HG Wells, está bastante bien pero tienen un problema, por su caracter episódico al publicarse un capítulo en una grapa en el formato original, Moore emplea en todos los capítulos un par de párrafos para poner al lector en antecedentes, y leídos todos los capítulos seguidos pierde ritmo.
Looking Backward: 2000-1887 :: Fog Magic :: The Illuminatus! Trilogy :: World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War :: The Complete Stories of Truman Capote
Self Obstructs
An interesting take on the characters from famous novels if you put them into a twisted little world that Alan Moore creates for this series. I love the actual art: so many shadows to emphasize character emotions and expressions, with a quirky way of looking at the Victorian era. This first book looks to show how all the main characters come together, and a large mystery/adventure they all undertake, like the perfect hitman team. I would suggest this as a nice quick read, as long as the reader d An interesting take on the characters from famous novels if you put them into a twisted little world that Alan Moore creates for this series. I love the actual art: so many shadows to emphasize character emotions and expressions, with a quirky way of looking at the Victorian era. This first book looks to show how all the main characters come together, and a large mystery/adventure they all undertake, like the perfect hitman team. I would suggest this as a nice quick read, as long as the reader doesn't take stock in the original characters that are depicted in this story - they are given different roles, and used for another device.
Kevin
An interesting read, the first two chapters as introductory are the weakest for me, the last two shows the true potential of the concept. I particularly enjoyed the little cameos such as the Artful Doger and his thoughts about civil air defense. I was also intrigued by the prior incarnations of the league that were hinted at, especially Bumpo and the Reverend Dr Syn.
David Cordero
Moore's writing, like always, is marvelous. His complete dominance of the English language is almost unequalled. O'Neill's art is enchanting and fits Moore's writing like a tight glove. Highly recommend this.
Zoeb
Did you ever feel that some films need to be erased from the collective memory of audiences who had the misfortune of watching and cringing at them?

After reading this magnificent graphic novel, the first of a series of rollicking, racy and raunchy steampunk adventures, you will swear if anyone could somehow make the 2004 film with the same name disappear into dust.

Yes, the 2004 movie starring greats like Sean Connery and India's very own Naseeruddin Shah and one that we, as schoolboys, thought t Did you ever feel that some films need to be erased from the collective memory of audiences who had the misfortune of watching and cringing at them?

After reading this magnificent graphic novel, the first of a series of rollicking, racy and raunchy steampunk adventures, you will swear if anyone could somehow make the 2004 film with the same name disappear into dust.

Yes, the 2004 movie starring greats like Sean Connery and India's very own Naseeruddin Shah and one that we, as schoolboys, thought to be decent fun. Oh, how growing up erodes all those guilty pleasures and makes you aware of newer, more extraordinary pleasures!

Nevertheless, coming to the graphic novel, written by (let's hear the fanfare, please!) Alan Moore and illustrated with a cock-eyed yet unerringly detailed, atmospheric and even roving perspective by (bring on the applause again!) Kevin O'Neill. This 'League' is, to begin with, a far more thrilling lineup of Victorian-era adventurers, anti-heroes, freaks, dames and villains pitted together for a MI6 plot to ensure that the crime-lord of East End does not fly the coop literally with a powerful element called 'cavorite'.

It does not matter if you have never read a bit of HG Wells' novels, 'Dracula' or even that adventure about diamond mines in Africa. What matters is that Moore's rip-roaring narrative, packed at the seams with deliciously wicked wordplay, cheeky innuendo and blood-splattered action, will hurtle you through such an assortment of deafening fireworks, pitch-black comedy and lovably weird characters that you will be tempted to hit the 'classics' section in the nearest bookstore or library.

Of course, as I said before, if you have not touched any of the classics before, chances are that after being swept through the relentless tide of Moore's wildest, even most brilliantly audacious and perverse imaginings brought to stunning, even seedy and sordid life by O'Neill's panels, you will find the seriousness of some of the source a bit of a downer.

Or rather, you will discover, for the first time, the hypnotic magnetism of Captain Nemo, the helplessness of Mina Harker in face of an indescribable evil, the rippling heroism of Alan Quartermain, the seething malice and megalomania of Griffin and the horrifying yet all too human pathos inside Mr. Hyde.

'The League Of Extraordinary Gentleman' is that rare piece of revisionism, an adventure so full of oomph, style and sleaze on its own term and yet one that brings back the glory of adventure and horror writing long before it became such an abused genre.

Dig in.
Megan
Yes, I’m excited to move on to Volume 2. Luckily it’s right here beside me. Thanks Andy.
Gayle Francis Moffet
Great art and a tight story as only Alan Moore can put it on the page. I really, really wish he could have come up with something better to show Quartermain was still functional without stooping to attempted rape (so he could save the only woman in the cast) and some way to show the Invisible Man is a complete reprobate without having him commit multiple rapes (under the guises of impregnating teenage girls via "immaculate conception").

"But, Gayle," you might be saying, "the book was written th Great art and a tight story as only Alan Moore can put it on the page. I really, really wish he could have come up with something better to show Quartermain was still functional without stooping to attempted rape (so he could save the only woman in the cast) and some way to show the Invisible Man is a complete reprobate without having him commit multiple rapes (under the guises of impregnating teenage girls via "immaculate conception").

"But, Gayle," you might be saying, "the book was written thirty years ago. Give it a break."

No. It had a lot of interesting stuff going on, and it was lazy even then to use rape as a plot device. The use of it has aged terribly, and I'm damned sick of it still being used today. In Watchmen, the attempted rape of Sally Jupiter served a deeper purpose to the story. The inclusion of it is meant to show the animalistic, awful side of the Comedian while also showing that Sally as a character is as complicated and hard to understand as anyone else in the story. In this book, it's used as shorthand to show you one man is powerful and the other is awful (while playing his fourth sexual assault as a sight gag in the panel that reveals what's going on). It's lazy, and Alan Moore has always been a better writer than that.
Willow Redd
What do you get when Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill decide to create a Victorian-era superhero team using characters from classic literature? You get the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, one of the greatest comic book concepts ever conceived!

As a fan of crossover stories, it's hard to top what Moore and O'Neill have done here. Not only do they bring together the main characters as a team of unusuals working for the British government, but the entire series is simply teaming with references to ot What do you get when Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill decide to create a Victorian-era superhero team using characters from classic literature? You get the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, one of the greatest comic book concepts ever conceived!

As a fan of crossover stories, it's hard to top what Moore and O'Neill have done here. Not only do they bring together the main characters as a team of unusuals working for the British government, but the entire series is simply teaming with references to other Victorian literary characters and occurrences. Also it sees two of the eras greatest literary villains square off for superiority using Professor Cavor's marvelous anti-gravity creation.

Even if you aren't well versed in Victorian-era literary figures, this is still an extremely entertaining world that Moore and O'Neill have put together, and everyone needs to give it a read at least once. It is so very worth it.
Marla Haasz
4.5/5

Creative, ridiculous, funny, silly. Well-known characters from classic literature incorporated into an absurd version of their era results in a load of fun. Loved that the characters original personalities remained the same rather than having them 'reinvented' or something like that.

I had very few issues but I am willing to over-look them as Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill are taking a stab at the prudish classes that existed in the late 1800's.

*continues to ignore the 2003 film adaptation*
Daniel
I've read this a few times now and it's just never as good as I want it to be. I should probably learn my lesson.
Jesse A
Ok. I'm really starting to be confused by the Alan Moore love.
Lynn
Upon rereading it I am bumping this up from 4* stars to 5*stars.
My apologies to Mr Moore for not doing so earlier.
Ericka Hall
Okay, if you like action, adventure, and a fast paced story with lots of fighting then you'll enjoy this graphic novel. I liked the steampunk backdrop a lot, and the time period is set at cusp of the British Empire's decline. The characters were so animated too! I have a preference towards characters that are neither good or bad so that you must keep guessing their motivations and interests throughout the story, and the five main characters are exactly like this. This was an intriguing graphic n Okay, if you like action, adventure, and a fast paced story with lots of fighting then you'll enjoy this graphic novel. I liked the steampunk backdrop a lot, and the time period is set at cusp of the British Empire's decline. The characters were so animated too! I have a preference towards characters that are neither good or bad so that you must keep guessing their motivations and interests throughout the story, and the five main characters are exactly like this. This was an intriguing graphic novel with an excellent plot line as well as very creative artwork.
Nicole
Very different from the movie... wondering if some of the characters I loved from the movie will make an appearance in Vol. 2...
Kevin
Well, lets start this off by saying this is the first graphic novel I have read in over twenty years (used to read 2000AD and a few others when I was a teen). I have seen a lot of interest in this genre grow in the past few years, with films such as V for Vendetta, Ironman, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen being based around their comic book counterparts. I liked all the film adaptations which have been released, so I thought I would buy League of Extraordinary Gentlemen to see, more th Well, lets start this off by saying this is the first graphic novel I have read in over twenty years (used to read 2000AD and a few others when I was a teen). I have seen a lot of interest in this genre grow in the past few years, with films such as V for Vendetta, Ironman, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen being based around their comic book counterparts. I liked all the film adaptations which have been released, so I thought I would buy League of Extraordinary Gentlemen to see, more than anything, what the fuss or trend is about. And I think its good, or at least this particular book is.

For one thing, volume 1. is totally, and I repeat, totally unlike the film adaptation; the film is a totally different story and even has added extra characters into it, such as Dorian Grey (whom I think could also have worked well in the book, due to its London based setting). The setting is the 19th fin de siècl,set in a kind of Victorian steampunk setting; weird semi-modern inventions in a victorian era and some fantastic illustrations by Kevin O'Niell really set the stage, with massive empire-orientated architecture. It seems like its some type of Dystopia, but not quite – I think it is its dark, steamy, setting that gives off that kind of atmosphere, as well as how the the people are drawn; bulky men, slim petite women, the poor looking very haggard and so on. The characters, or the League, are all 19th Century fictional figures; Mina Harker, the recruiter of the League, is of course none other than the same women from Dracula who was one of the counts first victims on arriving in England; Alan Quatermaine, from Kings Solomon's mines plays quite a central role, and he is found convalescing in Cairo (again different from the film); Dr Jekyll (of none other than of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde) who is being hunted as a monster terrorising the Rue Morgue; The Invisible Man; and of course, Captain Nemo, Jules Verne creation, whom I think is the best character in the book, with his Nautilus.

All these are brought together by Mina who works for a government agency, for some secret mission to save London from an imminent aerial attack, by a secret Chinese gang, who have a device that allows flight and are building some kind of terror weapon underneath the Thames. The League, via their characters differing and unusual abilities, set out to thwart this plot, and succeed in spectacular style, only then to find out that the device used for flight is to be used by another criminal gang, led by one Professor Moriarty – Sherlock Holmes' nemesis, and so the fun begins again, with Nemo leading the way with an air balloon and a rapid firing harpoon chain gun...great stuff.

I loved the references, hints and acknowledgements to late Victorian fiction; we have the League members of course, but then throughout the comic there are references to Dickens' Oliver Twist and HG Wells' War of the Worlds, all combined within this graphic novel. If you would be an English student of the late 19th Century, then you really would (or at least should) get off greatly on this book. Its great. However, the feminists among us might get offended of its (quite overt) sexism, but I don't think this is done in a nasty way at all; for instance Quatermaine holds sexist assumptions towards Mina, as do all the male characters, but I think this also could be done tongue in cheek, just representing the era the book is set in (for god sake Stokers Dracula was an incredibly sexist book compared to Frankenstein which was almost 80 years earlier). However Mina is a strong character throughout.

All in all, I loved it for its literary references and its novel way of incorporating all those famous 19th Century fictional people into a 'steampunk' setting. I think I am hooked on graphic novels now :)
Andrew
I first read this series when I was in college. At the time, I was put off by the casual depictions of racism, murder, and sexual violence. It felt like Moore and O'Neill were using the Victorian setting as an excuse to wallow in ugly and taboo subject matter. Re-reading it ______ years later, I find myself revising my opinion. The subject matter is often ugly, but it serves a purpose. Just as Watchmen uses superheroes to examine the politics and psyche of Cold War America, The League of Extraor I first read this series when I was in college. At the time, I was put off by the casual depictions of racism, murder, and sexual violence. It felt like Moore and O'Neill were using the Victorian setting as an excuse to wallow in ugly and taboo subject matter. Re-reading it ______ years later, I find myself revising my opinion. The subject matter is often ugly, but it serves a purpose. Just as Watchmen uses superheroes to examine the politics and psyche of Cold War America, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen uses the Victorian equivalent of superheroes to study the sexual and racial anxieties of Imperial Britain. Those anxieties are often just beneath the surface of the era's popular fiction; The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen merely makes them plain.

The popular fiction of the Victorian era is also quite imaginative and fun, which is why we still read it today. Luckily, Moore and O'Neill capture the swashbuckling feel of the era's fiction in addition to its troubling undercurrents. The art, pacing, and use of silence are all incredibly thoughtful and make for a read that's full of suspense, menace, and excitement. And in Mina Murray, Moore has created one of his most compelling protagonists. Her haughty British stoicism covers both a deep well of hurt and a steely-eyed competence.

The mix of fun, horror, and insight place this volume on par with Swamp Thing and the aforementioned Watchmen as some of my favorite work by Moore.

Siobhan
I’m really not sure what I expected from this – but it wasn’t quite what I was given.

I know a lot of people have issues with this concept, but I rather enjoy it. It’s a fun splicing of so many different things. However, it is far from perfect. Fun, but imperfect. The fun factor in the graphic novel was less than what I had with the movie – which is really saying something, considering how I’m a big believer of the movie always being the worst version of a story.

I think it’s just my love-hate rel I’m really not sure what I expected from this – but it wasn’t quite what I was given.

I know a lot of people have issues with this concept, but I rather enjoy it. It’s a fun splicing of so many different things. However, it is far from perfect. Fun, but imperfect. The fun factor in the graphic novel was less than what I had with the movie – which is really saying something, considering how I’m a big believer of the movie always being the worst version of a story.

I think it’s just my love-hate relationship with graphic novels, though. I’ll read them, occasionally, yet I find it hard to truly love them. Don’t get me wrong, it wasn’t the worst graphic novel ever – it just wasn’t what I had hoped for. The story left me cringing more than it left me smiling.
Sarah Sammis
Quite enjoyable. As a fan of 19th century adventure novels, I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novel. I wish I could read Arabic and Chinese to fully understand what happened. I also just recently saw the film version and enjoyed it as well. I think both versions highlight the strengths of their respective media. I will say that the comic version of Nemo's sub is slightly more believable than the cinematic version plus I have to give credit to the graphic novel remembering the sequel The Mysterio Quite enjoyable. As a fan of 19th century adventure novels, I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novel. I wish I could read Arabic and Chinese to fully understand what happened. I also just recently saw the film version and enjoyed it as well. I think both versions highlight the strengths of their respective media. I will say that the comic version of Nemo's sub is slightly more believable than the cinematic version plus I have to give credit to the graphic novel remembering the sequel The Mysterious Island which is by far my favorite Jules Verne book.
Austin
Moore plays around with famous literary characters, ranging from Dr. Jekyl & Mr. Hyde, to the invisible man and Captain Nemo. He discovers that t here is more life yet to be had in these iconic Gentleman. However, the term "Gentleman" must be used very loosely. Following in the wake of the beloved English detective Sherlock Holmes, a rag-tag ensemble of very flawed, yet very capable, men are assembled to take on the perils of the post-Holmes global security. Very well-written, very good artw Moore plays around with famous literary characters, ranging from Dr. Jekyl & Mr. Hyde, to the invisible man and Captain Nemo. He discovers that t here is more life yet to be had in these iconic Gentleman. However, the term "Gentleman" must be used very loosely. Following in the wake of the beloved English detective Sherlock Holmes, a rag-tag ensemble of very flawed, yet very capable, men are assembled to take on the perils of the post-Holmes global security. Very well-written, very good artwork.
Sookie
A fluffy action read that is fast paced with interesting characters and most fascinating Victorian setting. It is a fun read - something you can pick up on a slow day and get through this fast. It dodges political incorrectness, Moore-esque character tropes and overall its an indulgence of adventures.
Alatea
What could I say? As always I have it quite difficult to review comics/visual novels, as there are so little place for characters/relationship evolving, background stories and etc... These are the things that I usually enjoy in a book. Anyway, I liked it A LOT more than the movie.
Bryce
Steampunk meets a pastiche of Victorian adventure tales. Thank goodness Wikipedia exists, because each and every panel is filled with fascinating and esoteric references to history and literature and readers can spend hours exploring them.
Amy Elizabeth
Awesome graphic novel. However, if you're not familiar with Victorian popular literature, the book is shockingly racist and violent. If you are, Moore channels the period beautifully, and proves himself to be a master storyteller.
Eric
This was an interesting and enjoyable graphic novel, although it pales in comparison to The Watchmen -- Moore's masterpiece -- which was both deeper and more beautifully drawn.
Malik
I don't believe that Alan Moore is bad enough to write such a terrible climax, I think - or at least I like to think that he did it on purpose..for some reason.
John Yelverton
I read this book because I actually liked the movie. They have virtually nothing in common.
Roberta
Victorian England, some of the best literary characters hanging out together... what else could I want?
Love Mina.
Luz Alam
Al fin pude leer el primer volumen!! me encanta la gráfica, los colores y la mezcla de personajes :3
Ryan
I read the first two books in this series and didn't really like them. In theory, I like the idea of a graphic novel series that imagines characters from famous Victorian-era adventures (Captain Nemo, the Invisible Man, Doctor Jekyll/Mr Hyde, Allan Quatermain, Mina Harker of Dracula, etc.) working together in a secret league to defend an alternate reality British Empire circa 1900. Or else oppose it, in the case of a few repurposed villains. It sounded like it could be a fun, Indiana Jones-esque I read the first two books in this series and didn't really like them. In theory, I like the idea of a graphic novel series that imagines characters from famous Victorian-era adventures (Captain Nemo, the Invisible Man, Doctor Jekyll/Mr Hyde, Allan Quatermain, Mina Harker of Dracula, etc.) working together in a secret league to defend an alternate reality British Empire circa 1900. Or else oppose it, in the case of a few repurposed villains. It sounded like it could be a fun, Indiana Jones-esque romp.

In actuality, "fun" wasn't quite what this series (at least the first two books of it) was going for. It's more of a bleak, snarky "adult" riff on popular Victorian fiction, involving a lot of in-jokes and cameos (according to wikipedia, there's even reference to a series of popular 19th century pornographic novels). The whole exercise is clearly to meant to be subversive, but its tone left me with me a sour feeling. There's a lot of violence and gore, grotesqueness, characters that range between fairly unlikable and REALLY unlikable, sexism, racist caricature, and even a couple rape jokes. Yeah, I get that popular 19th century fiction had its problems and that the authors undoubtedly intended the less savory stuff here as edgy satire of the era and modern nostalgia for it, but I don't find much pleasure in heavy-handed, self-impressed smirkiness. Nor did I in the stories here, which, for all their property-hopping, were too silly and juvenile to make me feel invested in the stakes. There are a few cool sequences, such as one set on Mars, but they seem inconsequential to the main plot arc.

The artwork did its part in my overall impression. Everything has a dark, gloomy, misproportioned look, and none of the characters were drawn in an attractive way.

I know that Alan Moore is considered one of the geniuses of the medium and I have to check out some of his other work (e.g. The Watchmen), but, to me, these books were a good idea with a decidely unappealing execution. I'm not sure who the intended audience for this series is -- you have to be a fan of literature from this era to "get" it, but if you are, there's a good chance you'll find the unflattering appropriation of dead writers' iconic works and characters disrespectful. There's a difference between writing an Indiana Jones-like character that's a drunken, unpleasant crackpot and doing that with actual Indiana Jones. At least, if you're going to, it better be good.

Come to think of it, a movie in which a crabby, commie-obsessed old Indy has to mentor flower child graduate students in the search for some ancient power artifact on behalf of President Nixon (of whom Doctor Jones, in his dotage, is now an ardent supporter) *could* be fun.
Caitlin
Hoooo boy. This...was a book. I do not read much Victorian literature, so I'm sure there were plenty of references in the story that I missed.

What I liked:

the concept of the character mash-up

the idea to take a stylistic approach to the story (Victorian pulp)

Captain Nemo (for the most part)

the movie (fight me)

The plot was very odd but it works for the world depicted.

The line "throw this smelly little lesbian over the side" made me howl with laughter because it was so over the top and nonsensic Hoooo boy. This...was a book. I do not read much Victorian literature, so I'm sure there were plenty of references in the story that I missed.

What I liked:

the concept of the character mash-up

the idea to take a stylistic approach to the story (Victorian pulp)

Captain Nemo (for the most part)

the movie (fight me)

The plot was very odd but it works for the world depicted.

The line "throw this smelly little lesbian over the side" made me howl with laughter because it was so over the top and nonsensical.

What I didn't like:

the way the Victorian-ness was handled. If this is satire like I see some reviewers claim, I guess I didn't get it. The sexism and racism felt eager and genuine, especially with the artwork choices. The grotesque depictions of non-white characters were gross and troubling, at best. The bizarre, sexy girl's school was just...weird, although I guess I understood the satirical tone better. The claim of satire or writing to reflect the times seems like a weak excuse to just treat non-white or female characters like crap. If it is satire, much of it did not translate well.

Mina was just a weak, crappy character who hits all the low notes for a "strong female character". She was the shrew, the sexual assault victim and the sex object all rolled together. In general many of the characters were unlikable or somewhat bland.

Artwork: when it was bad (Usually when dealing with women's anatomy or the depiction of non-white people), it was pretty laughable or grotesque. Other times is was serviceable. I think some of it is an attempt to be overly dramatic and drive home more satirical points, but I generally found it unenjoyable in those parts. I understand stylistic choices, but I don't have to like or agree with them.

Short story about Quartermain: yeah I couldn't get through that.
Jackie Intres
The Good: fantastic illustrations, a captivating cast of Victorian-era fictional characters thrown into a jolly adventure, cool concept with ok execution

The Bad: So, for a few pages I thought the explicit racism was going to be revealed to be ironic or subversive in some way. Uhhhh...it's not. It's just really gross 19th century racism against Chinese people. That's it. That's the joke. So, I finished the last third of the book feeling pretty disgusted with such a completely lazy and disgusting The Good: fantastic illustrations, a captivating cast of Victorian-era fictional characters thrown into a jolly adventure, cool concept with ok execution

The Bad: So, for a few pages I thought the explicit racism was going to be revealed to be ironic or subversive in some way. Uhhhh...it's not. It's just really gross 19th century racism against Chinese people. That's it. That's the joke. So, I finished the last third of the book feeling pretty disgusted with such a completely lazy and disgusting premise.

I'm going to read the second volume because I would love to discover that there is some redemptive quality I'm missing...But there might not be.
Jamie
The detail in the art of this book is worth 5 stars alone and i loved the characters’ interactions and how they play off of each other in missions. however, the characters themselves aren’t...great. I know this book is supposed to be edgy, and it was published in 2002 and that was a different time, but having one of the main characters rape underage girls and play it off as “oh he’s just having fun, that’s just his personality” REALLY didn’t sit well with me
Raisu
Good God but the prose narrative that closes the volume is laborious to read.
Krys


Man, not feeling it right now. Could not get into this. I think it's the art, too stylized and not in a way that works for me. DNF.
Tanya-Marie
Phenomenal story, complex characters, and stunning artwork. Home run!!
Joshua Palmatier
I have NOT seen the movie version of "League of Extraordinary Gentlement," although I admit that the movie brought the graphic novel to my attention. So I can't do any kind of comparison between the novel and the movie. I'm going into this strictly in terms of comparisons to other graphic novels I've read.

First off, I absolutely LOVE how the novel mixes and plays with the literary works and characters of that time period. Basically, the League is a group of people formed to work for the governme I have NOT seen the movie version of "League of Extraordinary Gentlement," although I admit that the movie brought the graphic novel to my attention. So I can't do any kind of comparison between the novel and the movie. I'm going into this strictly in terms of comparisons to other graphic novels I've read.

First off, I absolutely LOVE how the novel mixes and plays with the literary works and characters of that time period. Basically, the League is a group of people formed to work for the government, all of the people in the group "special" in some way, although why they are special isn't always clear. In this case, we have the Invisible Man (who isn't, perhaps, the most kind and gentle person), Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde, Captain Nemo from "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," Alan Quartermain (the stereotypical English explorer adventurer), and Miss Murray (an enigmatic figure who I still don't recognize from any literary work or historical story of the time).

Alan Moore, the writer of the novel, has certainly taken these characters and twisted them in such a way as to make them even more interesting. One of the best examples of this is Mr. Hyde, the hideous "beast" form of Dr. Jekyll. Initially, he's seems to be the stereotypical monster that you expect . . . except as the novel continues you begin to realize that he is brutish and deadly, yes, but also canny and much more controlled than you'd think. He hides the fact that he can actually see the Invisible Man in this form. And suddenly, Mr. Hyde is a much more interesting character.

Similar things are done with the other characters as well, and considering that this novel contains only six issues, there's a TON going on. Not only do we get the formation of the group in the first 2 chapters, but we get all of these subtle plays on character as it progresses. Doing all of this with 5 characters all at once is impressive.

The plot of the novel is somewhat simplistic and straightforward, the main thrust being the formation of the group, their first job of finding and retrieving some stolen "cavorite," an element that has levitation properties, and then the twist on this entire setup and the final confrontation in the last 2 chapters. What keeps you interested with such a simple plot is the interplay between the characters, none of them very nice and with obvious flaws.

And then there's the artwork. I mentioned while reviewing "Sandman, Volume 1" that there was a ton of detail and I didn't like it much. There was a ton of detail in "League of Extraordinary Gentlement" as well . . . and I loved it! The difference between the two was that the detail in "Sandman" was garish and vivid and in the end distracting from the main characters and the plot. But HERE the detail did not distract. In fact, it amplified the quasi-steampunkish nature of the world these characters lived in and accentuated the characters themselves. In effect, the art here was PART OF THE WORLDBUILDING, and if it had been removed or simplified the novel would not have been as interesting nor held as much depth. I actually felt like these characters were LIVING in this world, because of that detail. And it was an interesting world to live in, different from our own, but also incredibly similar.

There were a few extras at the end of the novel as well, a cover art gallery and such. The biggest extra is a short serial story that I assume appeared in pieces, one part in each issue as it was released. I'm a published author myself, so take that into account in this review: I didn't like the serial short. I think Alan Moore was trying to emulate a style for the time period this was set in, but I still felt while reading it that it was unnecessarily wordy. The story itself was interesting . . . and draws again on another literary work of the time . . . but I found it hard to read. I've read some things in the style of this time period and this felt . . . overworked.

But that was an extra, not an essential part of the graphic novel itself, and I have to say that I really enjoyed the novel. I liked the artwork, the story, the characters, and above all the world and the mixture of the literary figures. I'm definitely picking up and reading Volume 2.
Marcelo Sanchez
Referencias, referencias, referencias. Muchas referencias y muchas de ellas sutiles, como el nombre en una caja de fusibles o las primeras lineas de cierto personaje de Moby Dick. Hubo muchos personajes y menciones que no pasaron por mi cabeza (Wikipedia ayuda mucho para estos casos), pero cada una de las que lo hicieron me dio un enorme placer.
Sin embargo, lo que más me gusta, es que este libro bien podría haber sido escrito en los principios del siglo veinte. Tiene todos los prejuicios racista Referencias, referencias, referencias. Muchas referencias y muchas de ellas sutiles, como el nombre en una caja de fusibles o las primeras lineas de cierto personaje de Moby Dick. Hubo muchos personajes y menciones que no pasaron por mi cabeza (Wikipedia ayuda mucho para estos casos), pero cada una de las que lo hicieron me dio un enorme placer.
Sin embargo, lo que más me gusta, es que este libro bien podría haber sido escrito en los principios del siglo veinte. Tiene todos los prejuicios racistas que se podrían tener en la época, los valores imperialistas propios del mundo previo a la primera guerra mundial y el sexismo propio de los "caballeros". Sin embargo, estos elementos tienen sus contrapartes, el sexismo es enfrentado por el tremendo personaje de Mina Murray (Mi personaje favorito en Dracula y mi personaje favorito en este comic) y el imperialismo es encarado por Nemo como representante de la revolución hindú. Dandole al comic una sensación de "libro viejo con ideas que eran nuevas para la epoca".
Los personajes son increibles. Están lejos de ser los heroes morales y perfectos. De hecho, Jekill/Hyde y Griffyn llegan a ser seriamente repulsivos (el primero como un asesino en serie y el segundo como un violador), el mismo Allan Quartermain aparece inicialmente como un drogadicto, Nemo es increiblemente sanguinario. En este ambiente, es imposible que Mina Murray no sea algo antisocial.
El arte es algo tosco y molesta un poco al principio. Tiene muchas lineas rectas en las facciones y parece profundamente caricaturizado presentadonos una horrible discrepancia entre Campion Bond y Mina Murray en sus primeras páginas. Pero dado los personajes, la caricaturización se vuelve necesaria (sobre todo con los estereotipados chinos). Hyde no habría sido el mismo con otros estilo de dibujo.
Becky
Definitely an adult comic. Overall I enjoyed it. It was exciting, and really fun to see some of my favourite characters back in action.
I believe the ever-present sexism and racism was purposefully overdone, because at times the dialogue seemed to go out of it's way to be offensive. It was funny most of the time. Sometimes it wasn't. Less than a third of the way into the comic Mina nearly got raped twice. Then there was Griffin, impregnating teenage girls in the name of God.

There was a lot of i Definitely an adult comic. Overall I enjoyed it. It was exciting, and really fun to see some of my favourite characters back in action.
I believe the ever-present sexism and racism was purposefully overdone, because at times the dialogue seemed to go out of it's way to be offensive. It was funny most of the time. Sometimes it wasn't. Less than a third of the way into the comic Mina nearly got raped twice. Then there was Griffin, impregnating teenage girls in the name of God.

There was a lot of immorality going on that was never dealt with, beyond everyone acknowledging that Griffin was an asshole.
Also, this was the most violent comic I've ever read.
The problem I have with the comic is not actually the violence or the sexism or the overall darkness. Black Widow comics are VERY dark, with most of the same activities going on. But they deal with it differently. This comic makes no attempt to be "deep." It throws all of these horrible things up there for the same of either excitement or humour, and never bothers to deal with them. It wanted to! There were moments when the characters seemed on the verge of discussing some of what was happening, but never seemed to be able to broach the subject. Black Widow comics embrace their own darkness and make it the focal point of the story. LoE uses darkness as a tool to be used and abused as needed.

Anyone still reading this is now like:


It was a good comic, despite the problems. I am definitely going to read the next one.
Laura
I tried to read the story at the end about Quartermain, but I could only manage the first chapter before being endlessly bored and annoyed. I've read elsewhere that it has some ties into the story, but I don't care enough to figure out what those ties might be.

I think, perhaps, had I read this before I became aware of the criticism about Moore, I might have enjoyed the story a bit more. But, instead of finding things amusing or exciting, I was mostly horrified. There is literally rape happening I tried to read the story at the end about Quartermain, but I could only manage the first chapter before being endlessly bored and annoyed. I've read elsewhere that it has some ties into the story, but I don't care enough to figure out what those ties might be.

I think, perhaps, had I read this before I became aware of the criticism about Moore, I might have enjoyed the story a bit more. But, instead of finding things amusing or exciting, I was mostly horrified. There is literally rape happening within the first few pages. Then there's a rapefest later at the girl's school. I found myself surprised when things weren't being raped. I also don't think it's possible for this artist to be much more offensive with his illustrations.

Instead, let me focus on things I enjoyed:
- Quartermain's face looking up Murray's skirt
- Murray in general was all kinds of awesome
- Nemo is kick-ass
- Hyde is legitimately horrifying
- Invisible Man makes your skin crawl
- Jeckyll actually seems like a kind, trustworthy voice of reason
- Putting together puzzle pieces to figure out who M is before the reveal

I'm waffling on whether or not to continue this series. I know there's at least a few more instances of rape (that I've heard of) and I just don't feel like I should give Moore any more of my money.

I love reading the reviews here that compare this novel to the movie. To me, the movie removed the rampant rape, racism, and misogyny and toned down the violence. The movie wasn't horrible and was way easier to swallow than Moore's original work.
M.
I had heard about the movie, but I didn’t know that the comic was the main origin. I read the movie had very bad reviews. I mean we are talking about review worse than Ryan Reynold's 'Green Lantern'. Any way I started reading the comic and believe me, it was freaking awesome. To know that all of my favorite characters, Captain Nemo, Invisible Man, Dr. Jekyll (aka Hyde), James Bond, Sherlock & Mycroft Holmes and (view spoiler)[ James Moriarty (so freaking unbelievable, by the way I hope you d I had heard about the movie, but I didn’t know that the comic was the main origin. I read the movie had very bad reviews. I mean we are talking about review worse than Ryan Reynold's 'Green Lantern'. Any way I started reading the comic and believe me, it was freaking awesome. To know that all of my favorite characters, Captain Nemo, Invisible Man, Dr. Jekyll (aka Hyde), James Bond, Sherlock & Mycroft Holmes and (view spoiler)[ James Moriarty (so freaking unbelievable, by the way I hope you didn’t read this spoiler, otherwise you have ruined the comic for yourself) (hide spoiler)] that they were all together and see them all together in one story arc is like over dozing on cool-ness. The badass-ery was top-notch. The 5 main heroes were marvelously depicted in the comic. It was like all of there authors had sit together and written this. Epic stuff! The art lacked a bit at some places and was (if I may say) a bit over comical at some places. A general hilarity pervasive in comics was present in adequate amounts. (view spoiler)[ All the part about Moriarty being a shadow fighter and a creation of Millitary Intelligence was difficult to digest and very weird not to mention totally unexpected. (hide spoiler)] However the character of James Bond was not what I think it should have been. Lastly, the ending was actually not as good as the rest of the comic. Also, the character of Miss Murray has been kept 'contained' for far too much time. Still a 4/4.5 star
Phillip
As, I suspect, with many people who first encountered TLoEG through the 2005 film version, I was surprised by this graphic novel, which is quite different than the film. For one thing, Allan Quartermain is really not all that helpful in the graphic novel, while in the movie he is the driving force of the group (though I suppose if you get Sean Connery for your film you give him the best part possible)--instead the major character in the League is Mina Murray (Mina Harker in the film). I can only As, I suspect, with many people who first encountered TLoEG through the 2005 film version, I was surprised by this graphic novel, which is quite different than the film. For one thing, Allan Quartermain is really not all that helpful in the graphic novel, while in the movie he is the driving force of the group (though I suppose if you get Sean Connery for your film you give him the best part possible)--instead the major character in the League is Mina Murray (Mina Harker in the film). I can only assume that the producers of the film believed that an American audience would be reluctant to accept a woman as the leader of a group of morally questionable male heroes.

The other really big difference is that the film did away with the rather racist Asian villain of the graphic novel (evoking classic mystery novel villains like Fu Manchu). The film collapses the graphic novel's two villains--the Devil Doctor and James Moriarty--into just Moriarty-as-the-Phantom, but gives him a secret layer in Mongolia.

Although I do like the film, I think it does less daring things in confronting racism and sexism as embedded in the various intertexts the graphic novel draws upon.
Jake
It's so awesome. It really is. If you've ever enjoyed Victorian tales, it really does give you all that you want. But, not only that, it reads exactly like a Victorian tale as well as a pulp serial from ages ago. It's hard to know all the characters and references without looking them up, but you feel like a kid from decades past reading the classic sci-fi and adventure stories as modern storytelling.

The whole thing is adventurous, humorous, violent, unsettling and literary. The ending is a bit It's so awesome. It really is. If you've ever enjoyed Victorian tales, it really does give you all that you want. But, not only that, it reads exactly like a Victorian tale as well as a pulp serial from ages ago. It's hard to know all the characters and references without looking them up, but you feel like a kid from decades past reading the classic sci-fi and adventure stories as modern storytelling.

The whole thing is adventurous, humorous, violent, unsettling and literary. The ending is a bit weak, as you realize some characters outside of the League are just there for reference sake. They seem important, but you realize they aren't, as they're just there to be one more character from a Victorian tale around the birth of the 20th Century.

All in all, it was a full house of enjoyment. It's one of the only times I've read graphic novels as an adult and felt like a kid. I felt all like the stereotype of a kid rushing home to read and find out what happened to his favorite heroes. Seriously, it gave me a feeling that I've long searched for.
Joana Veríssimo
This is probably my fourth, or at least third reread (because it's something so small and quick to read), but this time I was reading it for school, so taking notes and everything, since I'll be writing a paper on the movie adaptation
I still LOVE this book!! It had been my favorite graphic novel for a long time (until I read SAGA, and really nothing compares to SAGA), and it's actually the first time I've read it since it became my second favorite graphic novel, but it didn't change my love for This is probably my fourth, or at least third reread (because it's something so small and quick to read), but this time I was reading it for school, so taking notes and everything, since I'll be writing a paper on the movie adaptation
I still LOVE this book!! It had been my favorite graphic novel for a long time (until I read SAGA, and really nothing compares to SAGA), and it's actually the first time I've read it since it became my second favorite graphic novel, but it didn't change my love for it!!
This idea is just fabulous!!! All these famous characters coming together under one story, and just interacting and conflicting with each other - I just really like the relationships between everybody!! And the plot is fun, it moves very quickly - it's really enjoyable!! And I quite like the art as well, it's very dark, and it's looks very much like actual drawings :D
Barbi
The story itself was interesting and engaging, and the plot and artwork had a cinematic sort of quality.

I'm familiar with most of the literary references. I thought that the graphic novel was a clever and well thought out amalgamation of the imperial romances of the late 19th century (as well as a few other works). In fact this melding of late 19th century (mostly British) fiction into a new steampunkish sort of world is what I liked best.

I wasn't, however, a huge fan of the artwork, but I thi The story itself was interesting and engaging, and the plot and artwork had a cinematic sort of quality.

I'm familiar with most of the literary references. I thought that the graphic novel was a clever and well thought out amalgamation of the imperial romances of the late 19th century (as well as a few other works). In fact this melding of late 19th century (mostly British) fiction into a new steampunkish sort of world is what I liked best.

I wasn't, however, a huge fan of the artwork, but I think this was more a personal aesthetic preference than failing in the artwork--though I do think that overall it was well suited to the mood of the League of Extraordinary Gentleman. My preference for all things brightly colored wouldn't have worked so well with the tone of the graphic novel.

Overall, a good read and well worth the time.
Cathy
It was clever, but not particularly engaging. I was interested in the beginning as I was figuring out who everyone was, but then it got really boring for a long time, I almost quit. The pace picked up by the end of issue four and it moved quickly after that. But the characters were just flat. He tried to make them witty, but he didn't try to give them any emotional depth, which is what I'm looking for in a story. I like banter too, but I need to connect with the characters to be excited to pick It was clever, but not particularly engaging. I was interested in the beginning as I was figuring out who everyone was, but then it got really boring for a long time, I almost quit. The pace picked up by the end of issue four and it moved quickly after that. But the characters were just flat. He tried to make them witty, but he didn't try to give them any emotional depth, which is what I'm looking for in a story. I like banter too, but I need to connect with the characters to be excited to pick a book, or it's sequels, up. The art didn't help with this since they all lacked expression in these stylized designs. They were sometimes pretty cool, but not expressive. I know very little about art but even I recognized the Toulouse-Lautrec inspired designs when they were in Paris. But it's did make it harder to connect to them.
Esteban
Haber visto la pelicula me suponia conocer los personajes, que es lo unico que recuerdo que se pareciese la peli al comic, pero aún así me ha gustado mucho.

Los personajes lo mejor, los guiños a todas las historias de aventura en la inglaterra victoriana, todos los guiños, con el globo de la Isla Misteriosa, los restos de los barcos hundidos con los que hacen los muebles del Nautilus y el spoiler de la protagonista Wilhelmina Murray, q al haber visto la peli te destripan, pero aun asi al unir el Haber visto la pelicula me suponia conocer los personajes, que es lo unico que recuerdo que se pareciese la peli al comic, pero aún así me ha gustado mucho.

Los personajes lo mejor, los guiños a todas las historias de aventura en la inglaterra victoriana, todos los guiños, con el globo de la Isla Misteriosa, los restos de los barcos hundidos con los que hacen los muebles del Nautilus y el spoiler de la protagonista Wilhelmina Murray, q al haber visto la peli te destripan, pero aun asi al unir el nombre suyo con el de su ex marido se enciende otra lucecita en la cabeza.

Son esa serie de luces y recuerdos los que hacen el comic muy bueno, la historia algo menos pq es previsible, aunque tb da a entender q hay una serie de comics, y q este solo el principio de la misma
Karen
I'd seen the movie, so was already familiar with the concept. It was suggested I read it after I finished The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and whinged about the modern adaptations of Hyde not representing the creature presented in the original tale. All in all, an enjoyable tale. Sexist, racist, violent? Yes. Entertaining? Also yes.

Also, sassy Mina is sassy and I think even stronger in this adaptation than in Stoker's original book.
Donna
I really liked this story and the thing I liked most was the characters from other Victorian literature who meet up in a new adventure. While I'm not sold on graphic novels generally, I will go and read "King Solomon's Mines" by Haggard and "The Invisible Man" by Wells.

Bringing characters from other novels to fight against villains from other novels all set in a steam-punk Victorian London was fantastic. I give Alan Moore a lot of credit for coming up with this idea.

I spent a bit of time on wiki I really liked this story and the thing I liked most was the characters from other Victorian literature who meet up in a new adventure. While I'm not sold on graphic novels generally, I will go and read "King Solomon's Mines" by Haggard and "The Invisible Man" by Wells.

Bringing characters from other novels to fight against villains from other novels all set in a steam-punk Victorian London was fantastic. I give Alan Moore a lot of credit for coming up with this idea.

I spent a bit of time on wikipedia checking all of the references and that helped a lot in understanding all of this. But I have to say, this story flowed a lot better than several of the other graphic novels I read.
Janne Paananen
Kerrassaan merkillisten herrasmiesten liiga kootaan ratkaisemaan 1800-luvun lopulla rikoksia Englannin salaisen palvelun lukuun kuin James Bond konsanaan.

Liiga koostuu kirjallisuuden supersankareista: Neiti Murraysta, Allan Quatermainista, Tohtori Jekyll & Hydestä, Hawley Griffinistä sekä kapteeni Nemosta. Epätavallinen kombinaatio tuntuu virkistävän kinastelevalta anti- ja epäsankarikombinaatiolta.

Komea kovakantinen julkaisu pitää sisällään viisi ensimmäistä sarjakuvaa, jonka massiivisehko Kerrassaan merkillisten herrasmiesten liiga kootaan ratkaisemaan 1800-luvun lopulla rikoksia Englannin salaisen palvelun lukuun kuin James Bond konsanaan.

Liiga koostuu kirjallisuuden supersankareista: Neiti Murraysta, Allan Quatermainista, Tohtori Jekyll & Hydestä, Hawley Griffinistä sekä kapteeni Nemosta. Epätavallinen kombinaatio tuntuu virkistävän kinastelevalta anti- ja epäsankarikombinaatiolta.

Komea kovakantinen julkaisu pitää sisällään viisi ensimmäistä sarjakuvaa, jonka massiivisehko loppumittelly käydään, yllätysyllätys, kirjallisuudesta tutun pääpahiksen kanssa. Kaikin puolin toimivaa visuaalista kerrontaa.
Kaysy Ostrom
Reading this book was kind of like riding the Indiana Jones ride at Disneyland. This is kind of a weird reference sooo let me explain. The plot itself was a bit corny but it was SO FUN because I felt like I was on a real classic adventure! The pictures were some of the most epic I've seen in a graphic novel. Some of them filled the whole page with giant cityscapes, or spaceships, or people being ripped apart with blood and guts flying (<--yup. not for the kiddos) And the dialogue was really c Reading this book was kind of like riding the Indiana Jones ride at Disneyland. This is kind of a weird reference sooo let me explain. The plot itself was a bit corny but it was SO FUN because I felt like I was on a real classic adventure! The pictures were some of the most epic I've seen in a graphic novel. Some of them filled the whole page with giant cityscapes, or spaceships, or people being ripped apart with blood and guts flying (<--yup. not for the kiddos) And the dialogue was really clever as well (Alan Moore = the best). It was just overall such a fun book to read. Also, reading graphic novels in public always means making new friends and I love that.
Hans
A clever read, not quite as layered as some of Moore's other works. But, overall it was still an enjoyable read, tying together some of England's more famous Victorian Era Literary heroes. I was on a sharp look out for any subtle messages that Moore usually hides in the background and I was surprised by how few there were. One that was funny was the statue of the Baron Munchhausen. Though I wished it were more nuanced, Moore is still one of the better Author's in this genre, his stories at least A clever read, not quite as layered as some of Moore's other works. But, overall it was still an enjoyable read, tying together some of England's more famous Victorian Era Literary heroes. I was on a sharp look out for any subtle messages that Moore usually hides in the background and I was surprised by how few there were. One that was funny was the statue of the Baron Munchhausen. Though I wished it were more nuanced, Moore is still one of the better Author's in this genre, his stories at least never feel sophomoric.
Margaret King
Pays homage to the tradition of the penny dreadful, but sadly, not in a good way. The illustrations and idea were superb, and the bonus pages at the end were great fun. Unfortunately, the story itself falls a bit short, and is filled with all sorts of wink-wink, nudge-nudge racist and sexist humor. If artfully done, maybe the authors could have pulled that off, but I found it disappointingly school boyish and sophomoric. I tried reading one of the later installments (in the Century series) and i Pays homage to the tradition of the penny dreadful, but sadly, not in a good way. The illustrations and idea were superb, and the bonus pages at the end were great fun. Unfortunately, the story itself falls a bit short, and is filled with all sorts of wink-wink, nudge-nudge racist and sexist humor. If artfully done, maybe the authors could have pulled that off, but I found it disappointingly school boyish and sophomoric. I tried reading one of the later installments (in the Century series) and it was even worse. Somewhat fun from a historical perspective, but mostly just kind of amateurish.
Hikmat Kabir
Don't pass on the chance to read this book just because the movie was awful. The book's story line is a lot different and wholly superior than its movie counterpart. The characters here are all morally ambiguous which makes up for a fine reading and the plot is well structured although at times it leaves to be a lot more to be desired. The artwork here is top notch with some exceptional fight scenes that are firmly etched in my mind. Its not definitely the best Alan Moore novel out there but it Don't pass on the chance to read this book just because the movie was awful. The book's story line is a lot different and wholly superior than its movie counterpart. The characters here are all morally ambiguous which makes up for a fine reading and the plot is well structured although at times it leaves to be a lot more to be desired. The artwork here is top notch with some exceptional fight scenes that are firmly etched in my mind. Its not definitely the best Alan Moore novel out there but it still is a fine piece of work worth going through.
Kasi
Not really that great. Everyone seems to hate the movie but it's one of my faves and I prefer it way more than this comic. The characters are way more interesting in the movie and make more sense. I like that the comic plays off Sherlock Holmes though and it was entertianing albeit a bit confusing and lack luster at times. I also chose to skip the "short story" at the end about Mr. Quartermain due to lack of interest and dislike for the writing style.
GrimMandarin
A sort of mash-up of literary legends, adventure and steampunk which I just found boring, self-satisfied and impossible to enjoy. I get that it's supposed to be satirical, I get that it's making points about sexism, racism and class snobbery, but it just felt a little too smug.

If this book had a face, it could do with a gentle slap and being told that it's not half as clever as it thinks it is.

I did like the cover, though.
Elizabeth
Good for my new "Postmodern Victorians" course. Less lurid and graphically profane than Alan Moore's "From Hell," (which sadly has a much more interesting story) with lots of clever winks and nods to 19th century culture and publication. This graphic novel also engages in Steampunk, so it should yield interesting discussions. You don't need to have read the other books that it's based on (I think), but it would probably help.
Helen
Alan Moore is a crusty old bastard, but damn, can he write. I overstate for comedic affect (and fail) but he is an extremely opinionated person and his comics are thought provoking and really well written. Be aware of this as you go in, you may come across opinions that are strongly and wildly different from your own. This does not diminish his skill in any way, and in fact, is a brilliant example of how he sends bugs directly up your proverbial nose, and you go back for more.
Liz
Alan Moore is a god, and this is yet another masterpiece. I'd really recommend reading the story at the end of the book, although it isn't comic-esque, it uses absolutely amazing descriptive vocabulary and really draws you in. Altogether an amazing book, now I just have to boy-cott the movie so as not to ruin it!
Elizabeth German
This was a somewhat hard read for me. The setting is in London and a group of extraordinary people are gathered to fight, all having unique abilities and coming from there own story. A conflict happens and they have to fight off something, ending with a satisfying resolution. I recommend this to people who like superheroes, and hard reads.
Chomal
Absolutely marvelous. Really loved the graphic novel bringing all those childhood role models to life in one epic plot. Amazing how it is secretly woven around Sherlock "The Great Detective" Holmes universe. Suggesting to everyone who are into comic novella.
Nadia
4/5 estrellas
Sin duda alguna este tomo de La liga de los hombres extraordinarios es digno de mención. Imprescindible para todos aquellos que amen la temática Steampunk y que tengan curiosidad por algunos de los personajes más conocidos de ciertos clásicos de la literatura.
Arthur Graham
Don't let the dreadful film adaptation scare you away from this marvelous series. If you've ever wondered what happened to all of your favorite characters from Victorian literature, look no further for the answers.
Brian Sammons
A great, great, great book where a group of Victorian characters (most of which are villains) must come together to save the world. What a great idea and one that is well implemented here. Forget the horrible movie, read this book instead.
Jessica
Cool. Like Neil Gaiman's The Sandman, Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes series.
Murry
I like the premise. I get to see several fictional book characters together or namedropped ex. Sherlock/mycroft/Jeckyl/Hyde. It was an interesting mix of old timey England with (sorta) steampunk influences. I liked it but I wasn't like OMGTHISCOMICMADEMYLIFE. Overall a good read.
Tar Buendía
3.5

Un poco lento y soso en algunas partes, pero al final me ha gustado bastante.
Beth E
I actually like the movie better. The characters did not leap off the page for me. This may be because I just don't like graphic novels very much.
Yaya
I'm surprised I liked it as much as I did. Great set of characters, all charming in their own way. On to volume two.
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