A Tramp Abroad

Written by: Mark Twain

A Tramp Abroad Book Cover
Twain's abundant humor waxes as freely as ever; this time, however, his amusement bears a more cynical cast, as he regards the grand tourist sights of 'Innocents' through older and more experienced eyes.
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 58
5
37
14
2
0
Looking for A Tramp Abroad in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

A Tramp Abroad Reviews

Steve
In this case, tramp is used not as a description of a person, but as the name of an action, the process of walking. It's ironic, of course, since Twain uses every chance he gets to tell us that his walking tour usually consisted of taking carriages, trains, boats, horses, or other means of conveyance. May I interject a personal note here? In high school, Mr. Hoyer told me in speech class that he couldn't figure out if I was being serious or trying to be funny when I gave my very ill-informed but In this case, tramp is used not as a description of a person, but as the name of an action, the process of walking. It's ironic, of course, since Twain uses every chance he gets to tell us that his walking tour usually consisted of taking carriages, trains, boats, horses, or other means of conveyance. May I interject a personal note here? In high school, Mr. Hoyer told me in speech class that he couldn't figure out if I was being serious or trying to be funny when I gave my very ill-informed but hilarious speech about trying to install a TV antenna on the roof. Clearly, he was no fan of Mark Twain, whose footsteps, it turns out, I was following without even knowing it. A Tramp Abroad tells of Twain's travels in Germany and Switzerland, and spends several chapters on the funniest and most over-the-top tale of mountain climbing. There is also a tour de force chapter describing his attempts to get along in his bedroom in the dark, and an astonishing chapter on the sword fights held by German university students on a regular basis. Travel books were a dime a dozen in the 19th Century, but hilarity on the subject required the special outlook of Twain. His art criticism, while blatantly philistine, is actually really funny, too.
Allison
In terms of Twain travelogue, I would say this is ultimately the weakest of the lot – although, bless, that still leaves a lot to enjoy. A Tramp Abroad starts out strong in Germany and builds thrills in Switzerland before sputtering to over-lingering in the Alps and plummeting to an abrupt conclusion in Italy so startling that I had no idea that I was going to be finishing the book until I was halfway through the chapter. You can tell that Twain was tired of traveling and lecturing with this boo In terms of Twain travelogue, I would say this is ultimately the weakest of the lot – although, bless, that still leaves a lot to enjoy. A Tramp Abroad starts out strong in Germany and builds thrills in Switzerland before sputtering to over-lingering in the Alps and plummeting to an abrupt conclusion in Italy so startling that I had no idea that I was going to be finishing the book until I was halfway through the chapter. You can tell that Twain was tired of traveling and lecturing with this book, that the luster was gone, as the second half of the book is heavily concerned with his homesickness for America.

Outstanding points: his interest in German university students and his "bromance" with Harris, a travel partner so uniquely pointed to be Twain's foil that it's almost as if he's been embellished by Twain's predilection to pad the truth of reality or something. Also, as per, the insults are killer – so killer, in fact, that they often veer into the acerbic. If I could, I'd probably rate this 3.75, but my love of Mr. Twain leads me to say that four stars are quite alright.
Sarah-Lambert Cook
I love to see a new place by walking in it. It's one of the best ways to experience the unfamiliar since it gives you time to explore and absorb the scenery. Maybe that's why I found it fascinating to read one of Mark Twain's lesser known works about his walking travels in Europe around the alps while I'm here in Germany. Twain's descriptions of university life in Heidelberg aren't so different from the way things are now even if they are a little more the 19th c variation.

What I really love is I love to see a new place by walking in it. It's one of the best ways to experience the unfamiliar since it gives you time to explore and absorb the scenery. Maybe that's why I found it fascinating to read one of Mark Twain's lesser known works about his walking travels in Europe around the alps while I'm here in Germany. Twain's descriptions of university life in Heidelberg aren't so different from the way things are now even if they are a little more the 19th c variation.

What I really love is how his humor and love of local folklore and legends really comes through here. I've found several places I want to visit in the area from reading his descriptions of walking (and sometimes rafting) in Germany (and some of the surrounding Alpine countries).

If you don't want to read the whole book (free on Kindle, by the way), you should AT LEAST check out his excellent essay from the book, "The Awful German Language" ...especially if you've had a go at trying to master the language yourself: http://german.about.com/library/blmtw...
Pericles/Cymbeline/The Two Noble Kinsmen :: Barrel Fever: Stories and Essays :: Over Sea, Under Stone :: The Elf Queen of Shannara :: To Say Nothing of the Dog
John Harder
I love Twain’s travel books. They are a perfect outlet for me. Reading about exotic and interesting places is much cheaper and easier than actually going there. Unfortunately people do not also write about uninteresting places, so I am compelled to actually visit only citadels of boredom. My tour of the lower Midwest springboarding from Kankakee IL begins August 30th – formal dress or toothbrush not required.

A Tramp Abroad (no not that type of tramp) has Mr. Clemens traveling through Italy, Ger I love Twain’s travel books. They are a perfect outlet for me. Reading about exotic and interesting places is much cheaper and easier than actually going there. Unfortunately people do not also write about uninteresting places, so I am compelled to actually visit only citadels of boredom. My tour of the lower Midwest springboarding from Kankakee IL begins August 30th – formal dress or toothbrush not required.

A Tramp Abroad (no not that type of tramp) has Mr. Clemens traveling through Italy, Germany and Switzerland. The entire book is filled with drolleries, including a comic scene in which Mark attempts to exit a dark room (he traveled 47 miles and was unable leave). However the best portion of the book is a description of German grammar and vocabulary. Anyone that can make grammar hilarious has talent – if he could have written a textbook for differential calculus textbook, I might have passed.
John P
Having read this book many years ago, I decided it was time for a re-read since, in the intervening years, I was lucky enough to have spent considerable time in Europe.
Well, this made all the difference, as this book was a joy. Not that it wasn't enjoyable the first time around. It's just that being able to compare one's own impressions with his adds a new dimension. I would have liked to meet Mr. Twain as he had a great sense of humor, right up my alley.
Secondarily, he details some of the mecha Having read this book many years ago, I decided it was time for a re-read since, in the intervening years, I was lucky enough to have spent considerable time in Europe.
Well, this made all the difference, as this book was a joy. Not that it wasn't enjoyable the first time around. It's just that being able to compare one's own impressions with his adds a new dimension. I would have liked to meet Mr. Twain as he had a great sense of humor, right up my alley.
Secondarily, he details some of the mechanics of travel, hotels, tours, etc. such that it places the differences between his age and ours in stark contrast.
Very entertaining!
Boris
I changed my original rating from 2 to 4 stars. This is in a sense a sequel to the very charming and humorous "The Innocents Abroad" but it not strictly a travelogue as the prior book was.

The book is a farrago of humorous anecdotes, Twain's wry observations on his further European adventures and the difference in character between the various Europeans and the Americans and some phantasmagoria.

There are laugh-out-loud moments and having an interest in the history of exploration and adventure, I I changed my original rating from 2 to 4 stars. This is in a sense a sequel to the very charming and humorous "The Innocents Abroad" but it not strictly a travelogue as the prior book was.

The book is a farrago of humorous anecdotes, Twain's wry observations on his further European adventures and the difference in character between the various Europeans and the Americans and some phantasmagoria.

There are laugh-out-loud moments and having an interest in the history of exploration and adventure, I found Twain giving background and quoting from other authors on mountaineering and the first attainment of the summit of the Matterhorn.

Lisa Findley
Mark Twain! Always hilarious. There are a few too many wordy passages describing yet another mountain range, but for the most part it's what we expect with Twain: some good information mixed up with many amusing anecdotes that lampoon just about everyone. My favorite recurring bit was the narrator professing to want to do a walking tour of Europe, but then taking every available opportunity to do anything other than walk--he travels by boat, raft, donkey, carriage, train, etc. Some sly observati Mark Twain! Always hilarious. There are a few too many wordy passages describing yet another mountain range, but for the most part it's what we expect with Twain: some good information mixed up with many amusing anecdotes that lampoon just about everyone. My favorite recurring bit was the narrator professing to want to do a walking tour of Europe, but then taking every available opportunity to do anything other than walk--he travels by boat, raft, donkey, carriage, train, etc. Some sly observations on the habits of American tourists, as well.
Elizabeth
While the parts about German mountain climbing got monotonous after a while, there are so many hilarious and witty points in this book that I give it a solid four stars. I enjoyed this even more than I enjoyed The Innocents Abroad and could clearly see Twain's literary development and greater comedic polish. Narrator Grover Gardner did a fantastic job, as usual. He is my only vocal Mark Twain! If you are interested in a great satirical adventure and a strong case for avoiding learning the German While the parts about German mountain climbing got monotonous after a while, there are so many hilarious and witty points in this book that I give it a solid four stars. I enjoyed this even more than I enjoyed The Innocents Abroad and could clearly see Twain's literary development and greater comedic polish. Narrator Grover Gardner did a fantastic job, as usual. He is my only vocal Mark Twain! If you are interested in a great satirical adventure and a strong case for avoiding learning the German language, read this one!
Maria
As usual, quite delightful. Sam Clemens is the king of exaggeration, which is a form of humor I enjoy more than most. My favorite line was, "I reached the summit . . . 40 times" when he was describing his climb in the Alps. Anyone who has climbed a mountain will appreciate the humor here. The book is mostly about traveling in Germany and Switzerland, although he throws in some anecdotes of the U.S. from time to time. The appendices include That Awful German Language, which was even funnier on se As usual, quite delightful. Sam Clemens is the king of exaggeration, which is a form of humor I enjoy more than most. My favorite line was, "I reached the summit . . . 40 times" when he was describing his climb in the Alps. Anyone who has climbed a mountain will appreciate the humor here. The book is mostly about traveling in Germany and Switzerland, although he throws in some anecdotes of the U.S. from time to time. The appendices include That Awful German Language, which was even funnier on second reading than it had been the first time.
Rhonda
There really aren't any superlatives to add to anything written by Mark Twain. It's Mark Twain, and therefore wonderful.

I will say that the first three-quarters of the book, representing his time in Germany, moved much more quickly and had more permanence than the final quarter. His experiences in Switzerland and Italy were rather hurried and lacked the humor of the first leg of his "pedestrian tour of Europe."

You should read this, if only for the spectacle of laughing constantly and having the There really aren't any superlatives to add to anything written by Mark Twain. It's Mark Twain, and therefore wonderful.

I will say that the first three-quarters of the book, representing his time in Germany, moved much more quickly and had more permanence than the final quarter. His experiences in Switzerland and Italy were rather hurried and lacked the humor of the first leg of his "pedestrian tour of Europe."

You should read this, if only for the spectacle of laughing constantly and having the other person in the room give you strange looks.
Andrew
This bit of travel writing isn't as expansive as The Innocents Abroad, but it contains more of Mark Twain's wit and storytelling mastery focused in the German, Swiss, and northern Italian countryside. It is a mix of the observational comedy, absurd embellishment, and out-right farce that makes it a delight to read in large chunks or individual chapters. It proves once again that some writing is timeless.
David Allen
It does have its ho-hum passages, and overall Twain's journey through Germany and Switzerland doesn't have quite the zing or variety as Innocents Abroad or Roughing It. But that's why this is a 4-star rather than 5-star review. It's wry, smart, sly, insightful, lovely and hilarious. You owe it to yourself to read Chapter 13, in which Twain stumbles around his hotel room in the dark rather than risk awaking his travel companion.
Philipp
Funny stuff.
Not a single, coherent piece, necessarily, but that doesn't seem to be the point.
I bet it would have been fun to travel with him. One should strive to have that attitude of openness and willingness to gently mock through understanding or at least attempting to understand.
A how-to-travel guide more than a travel guide, if you read into it.
Bryan
I loved this book. I wish I had the luck of another reviewer who found it in a charity shop as I don't have my own copy. As a big fan of Bill Bryson; it was interesting to read travel tales in a similar style but predating Bryson by about a century. I love Twain ' s wit; "German comes in tall black bottles and you tell it from vinegar by the label". :-).
hellocarmel
With his usual dry wit, Twain recounts a lengthy sojourn in Europe, including travels in Heidelberg and the Swiss Alps. Although his descriptions of Alp hiking are sometimes a little tedious, his suggestions for the improvement of the German language and recounting of traditional folklore tales more than make up for it.
Glenn
As a teacher of German, this was a must read if nothing else than for the short text at the end about "the Awful German Language." Suprisingly, the rest of the book was highly readable and highly amusing. Twain's anecdotes are antiquated, but filled with a humor that translates even to today, such as his description of climbing the Matterhorn... by telescope...
Elisabeth
What can I say, I love Mark Twain's nonfiction. This is no exception--for anyone who has ever traveled in Europe, its great reading about the little cultural idiosyncrasies of the different European countries, as well as the impressions of American tourists abroad. And Twain's appendix essay "The Awful German Language" is a must-read for any student of the language.
Ken Elser
The book takes a bit to get going, but once it does, it is pure Twain--witty, sarcastic, and laugh-out-loud funny. Particularly recommended if taken on a trip through Germany or Switzerland--the elements of Twain's satire certainly remain the same after 130 years.
The afterward in the book regarding "the awful German language" is a must for anyone learning German.
Darlene Hull
Some very fun moments in this book though I find Twain a bit of a wanderer. In narration as well as in task. Having lived in Europe it was fun to see the places we had both visited through his eyes! Having also struggled to learn the German language I found his treatise on that language the funniest thing I've ever read.
Rk Wild
Is it just my imagination, or does Twain become a lazier traveler as he ages? Not as fast-paced, or funny, as "The Innocents Abroad," and maybe trying a bit too hard to demonstrate his infamous acerbic wit...?
Natalie
I liked this and I disliked this. I got sick of Twain by the middle of the book... Sad.
Julie Richards-fox
Interesting book, has all the wit of Mark Twain, but a bit clunky in parts.
nerdynerdiernerdiest
While it's not a page-turned, this book just seems incredibly accurate... Modern Germany is so similar...
Jonathan
Witty Mark Twain book. The whole book is Twain traveling around Germany and western Europe pretty much making fun of everything.
Aj
This is a must read for anyone visiting Europe.

I visited the Doge's Palace in Venice this summer and the highlight was seeing Bassano's Hair trunk, which is how Twain describes it.
Kathy
Many parts were hilarious. Some were tedious. Go to Europe before you read it,,
Tom Sharkey
Re: Twain's opinions of the common ant. Very funny.
Gail
Very entertaining, had book club at my house in Jan.
Robert Davis
Required reading for anyone taking a long trip to Europe, especially Germany.
Nephi Jenks
Not as enjoyable as its predecessor, The Innocents Abroad. Haphazard storytelling. Exceedingly hilarious appendices, though.
Annie
What can I say....Twain is really hilarious! I LOVE the portions (now famous to many, I'm sure) about the German language. Too funny! And I think pretty true...
Patrick\
Liked the Wagner bit. Not sure what is true or fable. Always that way with Twain.
Velvetink
It's been awhile since I read this and I frankly can't remember when, but I do clearly remember loving it and laughing through it. A must read!
C.K.
A fun read as always when Mr. Twain is involved.
Mary Beth
Never realized how funny Twain was until I read this book. Makes fun of himself and Europeans. Love his drawings and the descriptions of them.
David
Very readable and amusing travelogue covering less familiar parts of Germany and some great alpine fantasia. Not as good as Innocents Abroad but full of little gems.
Regina
So funny. And some of it still true today.
I really appreciated the Heidelberg and Baden-Baden sections since I live in the area.
Trelesa
Not quite as captivating as "Innocents Abroad". Twain included more stories from others - while interesting, they lacked his flair.
Dan
Satirical, farcical, hilarious, absurd, cynical, sarcastic, racist, self-deprecating.
Sharon
I had forgotten how funny Mark Twain' writing are. It was free on my Kindle so I got it and enjoyed it.
Bill
One of my favorite all time reads. A modern classic. Hysterically funny. Do not miss out on this book.
Jonathan
i've never been disappointed by anything this man has written.
Linda
Mark Twain walks in Europe, stressing his time in Germany and Switzerland.
Ted Fox
If you don't have time to read the whole thing, read the appendices. Twain at his hilarious best.
Julie
More humor writing than travel tome. Not certain I finished it. Multiple chapters devoted to a fencing feud.
Galicius
After reading a dozen volumes by Twain I picked up this scribbling of his because I liked his previous travel reminiscences in “Innocents Abroad” as well as “Roughing It”. This is rather inferior. There are quite a few digressions that could very well be skipped, as would the first four chapters. He does not explain why he picked out Germany. He is very critical of English doings in Australia, Tasmania, India in “Following the Equator” but not a word about Germany here and how they carried on ag After reading a dozen volumes by Twain I picked up this scribbling of his because I liked his previous travel reminiscences in “Innocents Abroad” as well as “Roughing It”. This is rather inferior. There are quite a few digressions that could very well be skipped, as would the first four chapters. He does not explain why he picked out Germany. He is very critical of English doings in Australia, Tasmania, India in “Following the Equator” but not a word about Germany here and how they carried on against their neighbors. Is the arch-imperialist Bismarck worth a description “the great statesman”? The humor in this volume is sometimes better than his descriptions of the landscapes. He does tell some tall tales, like the one about St. Nicholas. He is completely wrong about the model for Santa Claus. He was not the Swiss St. Nicholas. I did not find his criticisms of American and English travelers as scathing as did some readers here. He travels in half a dozen European countries but describes mostly Germany, the German part of Switzerland, and a little of Northern Italy.

Bertie
This book is split into different sections by the different countries Twain visits. The first half of the book is all about his time in Germany, which is funny at times, is interwoven with plenty of fun stories to break up the text, but is also a bit boring.

After halfway into the book the author journeys into Switzerland, and this for me is when it starts to become a pleasure to read. The account is absolutely hilarious at times, especially when he’s up in the mountains and making attempts on a This book is split into different sections by the different countries Twain visits. The first half of the book is all about his time in Germany, which is funny at times, is interwoven with plenty of fun stories to break up the text, but is also a bit boring.

After halfway into the book the author journeys into Switzerland, and this for me is when it starts to become a pleasure to read. The account is absolutely hilarious at times, especially when he’s up in the mountains and making attempts on alpine peaks or ascending Mont Blanc via telescope or attempting to travel via glacier. Just priceless.

Not only is Twain a fantastic writer, a first of his kind, but he is so humorous it’s just a joy to read, even after 140 years!

The last section is his time in Italy where he mainly talks about art and architecture. But it’s his ramblings in Switzerland that will stick in my mind...
Pat
It's been a while since I bust out laughing while reading, then kept laughing till tears were streaming down my face. But Twain's description of his involvement as the second in a French duel had me doubled over. I doubt the veracity of the story just as I doubt the details in a Hunter Thompson book but it's no less valuable for that. It's too bad most of us stop reading Twain after being force-fed Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. His travel writing, which this is, is easily as good as th It's been a while since I bust out laughing while reading, then kept laughing till tears were streaming down my face. But Twain's description of his involvement as the second in a French duel had me doubled over. I doubt the veracity of the story just as I doubt the details in a Hunter Thompson book but it's no less valuable for that. It's too bad most of us stop reading Twain after being force-fed Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. His travel writing, which this is, is easily as good as the novels (The treatment of the Book of Mormon in Roughing It is another piece of writing not to be missed). He was our wisest writer, the American Shakespeare. And funny as hell.
Wolfgang
Doch sehr lang und nur wenige geistreiche Einsichten, lustige Formulierungen oder historisch interessante Anekdoten. Ziemlich bemühter Stil, der bei mir den Verdacht erweckt, ein Verleger habe Twain im Voraus für eine Europareise bezahlt, um sich die Rechte an dem Buch zu sichern.
Habe nach zwei Dritteln aufgehört.
Elissa
I've decided that Mark Twain and Bill Bryson are rather similar in their travel writing. They both use humor, personal stories, a curmudgeonly attitude, long rambling walks, and abundant quirkiness. But whereas Bryson is mostly just grumpy and critical, Twain is more funny, and has lovely vocabulary and a great turn of phrase. Not to mention tall tales and one liners. I like Twain better.
Paridao
Userò questa valutazione per mostrare la mia obiettività! Dare solo due stelle al, probabilmente, mio autore preferito non è stato facile.

Un veloce diario cui manca ironia e fascino nel descrivere posti. Cosa sempre tipica del vecchio Mark.

Ora leggerò il libro che ha preceduto questo, ambientato sempre in Italia.
Steve Browne
This was Mark Twain's 3rd travel book, this time about his walkabout in Germany and Switzerland. He likes the Germans a lot! So many good scenes and not too much stuffing. I think the long description of a fencing class and then an actual duel was a highlight. A mix of reality and farce. Love this book!
Alex Larner
Twain's tourist guide to Europe. Including sections such as, How to Mess with your Italian tour guide, Swordfights and German College Life, Frenchmen and their Duels, and many more.
Nick Skelton
Hard to read on Kindle but a really interesting read for any expat living in Germany
Vivi
Mark Twain leads you through Europe in a funny and intelligent way you can't resist. I love how he is so passionate about nature, especially when it comes to the Alps. All in all, it's a lovely read and I would recommend it everytime, but sometimes, you're likely to get kinda stuck. The long passages with explanations and articles can be a little hard to read through.
Jordan
Purchased from the bookstore on Universitätsplatz by the Neue Universität in Heidelberg when I was there after college; read during my month of summer school at the university. Wonderful experience. My favorite part of the book is still the appendix essay "The Awful German Language."
Boris Crismancich
Could not stop lauching. Many small stories about Twains tramp through Germany. The funniest read ever.
howtodowtle
A little shallow, but at times funny and a nice and easy read. Enjoyed the book.
Leave Feeback for A Tramp Abroad
Useful Links