A Good Man in Africa

Written by: William Boyd

A Good Man in Africa Book Cover
In the small African republic of Kinjanja, British diplomat Morgan Leafy bumbles heavily through his job. His love of women, his fondness for drink, and his loathing for the country prove formidable obstacles on his road to any kind of success. But when he becomes an operative in Operation Kingpin and is charged with monitoring the front runner in Kinjanja’s national elections, Morgan senses an opportunity to achieve real professional recognition and, more importantly, reassignment.

After he finds himself being blackmailed, diagnosed with a venereal disease, attempting bribery, and confounded with a dead body, Morgan realizes that very little is going according to plan.
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A Good Man in Africa Reviews

Rick Burin
Like Lucky Jim transplanted to Greene's colonial Africa... but not quite that good. I learned a lot of new words and STDs.
Marcus
A brilliant satire. The all to real misadventures of hapless and delusional foreign diplomats in a fictional country with strong resemblance to Nigeria.
Natasha Stutz
Read it on recommendation and needing another holiday book; it took a bit to get into but I thoroughly enjoyed the antics of Morgan Leafy.
دکتر نون زنش را بیشتر از مصدق دوست دارد :: Cómo ser una mujer y no morir en el intento :: The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy and Other Stories :: Salomé :: The Black Dahlia
Vicki
Second in command British Commissioner in made-up West African country struggles with job, etc.
Sarah Savoy
Funny, and also heartbreaking, if definitely not PC for today's world.
Lesley
Having lived in W Africa myself, this book rang very true for me. Funny and tragic in turn.
Clivemichael
Schadenfreude, however not so funny and uncomfortably close to reality. Excellent writing.
anna leggatt
A good laugh

Good characterisation. A very clever book. All the comic disasters flowed into each other and although the main character came over as a complete shit eventually we found we could forgive him and even sympathise with him.
Many good belly laughs. A good read.
Emma
I am going to preface this review by acknowledging that there are probably lots of people who will disagree with my assessment of this book and admitting that my feelings about it are a study in misinformed, and so disappointed, expectations. Basically, I didn't like it but then I was expecting something completely different which is down to me and has nothing to do with the author or the book! I have never read any William Boyd before but - for whatever reason - was expecting an empathetic expl I am going to preface this review by acknowledging that there are probably lots of people who will disagree with my assessment of this book and admitting that my feelings about it are a study in misinformed, and so disappointed, expectations. Basically, I didn't like it but then I was expecting something completely different which is down to me and has nothing to do with the author or the book! I have never read any William Boyd before but - for whatever reason - was expecting an empathetic exploration of characters, relationships and actions within the context of post-colonial Africa. How I managed to maintain this delusion in spite of the brief but candid description of unpleasant characters, 'comedy' antics and venereal disease on the back cover, I do not know, but maintain it I did. Therefore, my impression that this is a crass, misogynist and cliched book is so deep perhaps because it was so very different from what I expected.

In its better moments, there was a touch of 'Our Man in Havana' about this (the piecing together of an "intelligence" report based on newspaper clippings and snatches of conversations at "the club", for example) and I do think that some of the observation of ex-pat communities, diplomats and civil servants in former colonies was shrewd but this wasn't enough to save it for me. There was a glimmer of light towards the end when I felt that the whole tone and tenor of the narrative changed as the principal character had something of a revelation and began, in my eyes, to be a little redeemed but, again, it wasn't enough overall.

Not for me.
Cailin Deery
In a Good Man in Africa, we follow Morgan Leafy, First Secretary to the British Deputy High Commission, through his many tribulations in the fictional Nkongsamba (based in the fictional West African country of Kinjanja). He’s farcical to a painful degree. There is so much embarrassment, miscalculation, irresponsibility and naiveté throughout the novel (mostly with Leafy to blame). For a diplomat, Leafy is extremely impolitic. Somehow, his story is still hugely, wonderfully entertaining. I don’t In a Good Man in Africa, we follow Morgan Leafy, First Secretary to the British Deputy High Commission, through his many tribulations in the fictional Nkongsamba (based in the fictional West African country of Kinjanja). He’s farcical to a painful degree. There is so much embarrassment, miscalculation, irresponsibility and naiveté throughout the novel (mostly with Leafy to blame). For a diplomat, Leafy is extremely impolitic. Somehow, his story is still hugely, wonderfully entertaining. I don’t know what that says about me. For the record, I generally can’t stand stories with mounting,widening levels of mortification and miscalculation (see: any Ben Stiller movie); somehow this is different? Maybe because I agree with all implicit criticisms. It's not just a pure comedy of errors but one that transpires because a truly terrible person regularly makes poor decisions.

It’s one of William Boyd’s earlier novels (his debut, in fact) and I think it’s easy to see the differences in his earlier writing style. The character does seem unusually sordid for a Boyd character. He’s an overweight, oversexed misanthrope who cares little for others but finds himself increasingly desperate as he makes one miscalculation after another. His diplomatic approach is one of regular overshooting and constant oversight. All of his relationships seem failed, inauthentic or fraught at best, and the community of expats we get to know are also – in minor key – a bitter, untalented, myopic bunch who all seem to hate one another.

I make it sound awful! But it's brilliant.
Joanna
It took me a while to get into this book, and, though I was glad I persevered, my 4 stars are more of a 3.5 in reality. Having read Boyd's most recent works (Any Human Heart, Restless etc.) I have always viewed him as the obvious heir to Grahame Greene, writing rather cynical, thrilling, profound, outsider-English novels. This book was unmistakably in that vein- Morgan Leafy, the unhappy, oversexed, overlooked diplomat in West Africa could have been the brother of Major Scobie in Heart of the ma It took me a while to get into this book, and, though I was glad I persevered, my 4 stars are more of a 3.5 in reality. Having read Boyd's most recent works (Any Human Heart, Restless etc.) I have always viewed him as the obvious heir to Grahame Greene, writing rather cynical, thrilling, profound, outsider-English novels. This book was unmistakably in that vein- Morgan Leafy, the unhappy, oversexed, overlooked diplomat in West Africa could have been the brother of Major Scobie in Heart of the matter (he even references the book as one that formed his view of ex-colonial Africa. However, I found it hard to have much sympathy with Leafy, or indeed any other of the characters, until the final phase of the novel, and so was not completely engaged with the plot. However, the structuring of the book is quite remarkable, and really propels one through the story in an interesting way, dividing the book into three sections, a prolonged flashback to a few weeks before splitting the build up and culmination of the primary narrative. It is this skillful writing, and the characterization of the flawed individuals that gives one a taste of Boyd's potential. I didn't like the characters, but I could recognize them as human beings. I was not keen on the plot, but I could see in it vision, ideas and the roots of future works. As a first novel, it is a flawed but nonetheless impressive piece of prose.
Carl Rush
Third book of his I have read. Certainly not the best. Bit cheesy and a bit outdated.
Ester
I can't remember the last time I despised a main character so deeply. That is doubtless the intention, but I did not care at all what happened to Morgan Leafy. To be honest, every single other character was more interesting than him, and throughout the story I was holding on to the hope that Morgan would get publicly shamed, fired, exposed, or even die. I established no connection with him whatsoever.

Plotwise the third and last part of the novel is where the story finally began to pick up speed, I can't remember the last time I despised a main character so deeply. That is doubtless the intention, but I did not care at all what happened to Morgan Leafy. To be honest, every single other character was more interesting than him, and throughout the story I was holding on to the hope that Morgan would get publicly shamed, fired, exposed, or even die. I established no connection with him whatsoever.

Plotwise the third and last part of the novel is where the story finally began to pick up speed, turning into a somewhat Woodhousian farce. A few places were hilarious, but I did not laugh till I cried (almost the opposite in fact). The writing itself was good, from the structure of the novel itself to use of language, and I suppose that had Boyd made the main character even a remotely likeable person, the novel might have been very enjoyable indeed.

The one thing I absolutely did love about this novel, and which made me read it in the first place, is the title. Great, great title and bitterly ironic.
SarahP
This is a good enough book. Funny, not slap on thigh funny but still. It tells the story of a British expat appointed to the British Commission in a fictional West African country, with very low moral standards and capacity to introspection. He gets caught up in all sorts of things and blames the world for it, and all through that he might learn something... or not...

I've seen mixed review for this book, and I can understand why. I enjoyed it mainly because, as someone who has worked in Africa ( This is a good enough book. Funny, not slap on thigh funny but still. It tells the story of a British expat appointed to the British Commission in a fictional West African country, with very low moral standards and capacity to introspection. He gets caught up in all sorts of things and blames the world for it, and all through that he might learn something... or not...

I've seen mixed review for this book, and I can understand why. I enjoyed it mainly because, as someone who has worked in Africa (not as an expat, though), I can understand how people can actually become like the protagonist in these situations: these are people with money, with nothing to do, far from their family and network, in a world that has little to do culturally with their own. Expats have an aura of power that can easily get them into trouble. Not saying that everybody is like that, but there have been so many incidents of expats being caught in scandals, corruption, sexual exploitation of locals etc. This book shows how it can all work out... or not...
David Whittlestone
The few reviews I read before starting this book made me wish had not bought it. I'm glad I had. I found it a great read.

The prose was as always from Boyd, sharp, focussed and direct but always elegant without being pretentious. So it was a very easy light read. The story was an adventure in a west African state and clearly made use of Boyd's origins which he exploited to good effect.

The title is A Good Man in Africa and this is precisely what the hero came to be. He was a cad (though he would h The few reviews I read before starting this book made me wish had not bought it. I'm glad I had. I found it a great read.

The prose was as always from Boyd, sharp, focussed and direct but always elegant without being pretentious. So it was a very easy light read. The story was an adventure in a west African state and clearly made use of Boyd's origins which he exploited to good effect.

The title is A Good Man in Africa and this is precisely what the hero came to be. He was a cad (though he would have thought anyone other than he were the cad but would not have used that word), a fish out of water in terms of social standing and quite probably ability. He was being used and that became clearer as the story went on. He had every reason to take umbrage on several fronts against several different people. But he controlled this umbrage and finally turned it into the stuff of heroes. He became the hero of the hour.

Brilliant, as ever.
Mark Speed
Not Boyd's finest novel, but his first and a decent one. I seem to recall he felt he was under an enormous amount of pressure to get this baby out and I recognise first-novel traits in it. I've read some low reviews of this, and I understand what this is. The low reviews are from people who like late Boyd (which is a shadow of early-to-mid Boyd and apparently aimed at getting screenwriting gigs).

Boyd does a pretty decent job of ratcheting up pressure on a fallible character to crack him open. Bo Not Boyd's finest novel, but his first and a decent one. I seem to recall he felt he was under an enormous amount of pressure to get this baby out and I recognise first-novel traits in it. I've read some low reviews of this, and I understand what this is. The low reviews are from people who like late Boyd (which is a shadow of early-to-mid Boyd and apparently aimed at getting screenwriting gigs).

Boyd does a pretty decent job of ratcheting up pressure on a fallible character to crack him open. Boyd is not known as a writer of farce, but he did do humour very well later in his career. You have to put this in its historical context - Britain was just completing the job of getting rid of its colonies at the time this was published. The situation was ripe for mockery. This political farce sadly turned into a bloody tragedy in many former colonies.
Michael Nixon
A postcolonial farce, not without humour. Reading it 34 years after its publication it does not rise to the comic heights of other comic novels Boyd' produced--Armadillo, for example--or build the tension of a dramatic novel like Ordinary Thunderstorms. Nonetheless it works, despite most of the characters, including anti-hero Morgan Leafy, being thoroughly obnoxious. The author makes no attempt to build empathy for them. And yet, there's a bit of "There but for the grace of god go I" about it. H A postcolonial farce, not without humour. Reading it 34 years after its publication it does not rise to the comic heights of other comic novels Boyd' produced--Armadillo, for example--or build the tension of a dramatic novel like Ordinary Thunderstorms. Nonetheless it works, despite most of the characters, including anti-hero Morgan Leafy, being thoroughly obnoxious. The author makes no attempt to build empathy for them. And yet, there's a bit of "There but for the grace of god go I" about it. How might I have fared in the circumstances, especially with a boss as ghastly as Fanshawe? Is it a novel to read to get a sense of West Africa, and Nigeria in particular, which the circumstances in the novel most closely resemble? Not really, though it's surely not totally off the mark. It's very much West Africa through Leafy's eyes, a posting to be endured.
Nick Duretta
This is Boyd's first novel, and like many of his others, concerns a basically good man (!) caught up in a complex situation. The hero of this story, hapless Morgan Leafy, a mid-level diplomatic flunky stationed in a remote (and fictitious) African country, is a bit more comical than most of Boyd's protagonists. He has a knack for doing precisely the wrong thing, again and again, to the point where you're not sure whether you want to root for him or not. But he somehow manages to survive, and thr This is Boyd's first novel, and like many of his others, concerns a basically good man (!) caught up in a complex situation. The hero of this story, hapless Morgan Leafy, a mid-level diplomatic flunky stationed in a remote (and fictitious) African country, is a bit more comical than most of Boyd's protagonists. He has a knack for doing precisely the wrong thing, again and again, to the point where you're not sure whether you want to root for him or not. But he somehow manages to survive, and through it all, have women throw themselves at him right and left. You get the impression at the end that he's learned something about himself, but...
Kristie
I love William Boyd and I had somehow missed this gem. This is a novel in the best sense: great writing, wonderful story, engaging and annoying characters, very funny in places but also a sobering insight into imperialism. The main character is a bit of a mess....he gets himself into all sorts of scrapes and makes a lot of bad decisions. However, he somehow manages to redeem himself - or at least gives the impression he might, given enough time. I loved this and powered through it. Very engaging I love William Boyd and I had somehow missed this gem. This is a novel in the best sense: great writing, wonderful story, engaging and annoying characters, very funny in places but also a sobering insight into imperialism. The main character is a bit of a mess....he gets himself into all sorts of scrapes and makes a lot of bad decisions. However, he somehow manages to redeem himself - or at least gives the impression he might, given enough time. I loved this and powered through it. Very engaging.
Susan
I picked this book up in an open shelf at the library, not knowing much about it but of course interested in Africa. It is less about Africa and more about British colonialism in the 1970's. But, a Whitebread winner by a great British writer about a British minor diplomat in a small outpost and the troubles he encounters with the other diplomats, the locals and the British citizens. At times, it is laugh out loud funny, the writing is phenomenal and it still manages to say something about the hu I picked this book up in an open shelf at the library, not knowing much about it but of course interested in Africa. It is less about Africa and more about British colonialism in the 1970's. But, a Whitebread winner by a great British writer about a British minor diplomat in a small outpost and the troubles he encounters with the other diplomats, the locals and the British citizens. At times, it is laugh out loud funny, the writing is phenomenal and it still manages to say something about the human condition. I would highly recommend this book!
Emily Richards
Set in Colonial Kinjanja, Africa, Morgan Leafy is an over-weight, middle-aged man who is easily manipulated by others and is insufferably jealous of the man who woes and marries the girl he adores, Priscilla Fanshawe, who also happens to be his boss's daughter.

You can't help but feel sorry for Morgan but he does put himself into awkward situations, like the time he finds himself hiding in a bath with the shower curtain drawn while he listens to a large well-to-do lady going to the toilet; but in Set in Colonial Kinjanja, Africa, Morgan Leafy is an over-weight, middle-aged man who is easily manipulated by others and is insufferably jealous of the man who woes and marries the girl he adores, Priscilla Fanshawe, who also happens to be his boss's daughter.

You can't help but feel sorry for Morgan but he does put himself into awkward situations, like the time he finds himself hiding in a bath with the shower curtain drawn while he listens to a large well-to-do lady going to the toilet; but in the end he does something quite heroic.
Cindy
Morgan Leafy is quite the character! Life just kept throwing curve balls at him and he had to keep diving out of the way! Some of the messes he found himself in were of his own making and the result of poor choices he made. Still others were created by other people and Morgan was dragged into the middle of them by "players" he couldn't say "no" to! Morgan is a disgruntled, cynical man, but by the end of the book, one gets an inkling that he is "seeing the light" and may, quite possibly, come out Morgan Leafy is quite the character! Life just kept throwing curve balls at him and he had to keep diving out of the way! Some of the messes he found himself in were of his own making and the result of poor choices he made. Still others were created by other people and Morgan was dragged into the middle of them by "players" he couldn't say "no" to! Morgan is a disgruntled, cynical man, but by the end of the book, one gets an inkling that he is "seeing the light" and may, quite possibly, come out a better man! I loved the comedic elements of this book. Enjoyable read!
Barbara
Very enjoyable read. At several points I was completely cracking up. The terrible night with Priscilla, the Santa Claus episode, the VD incident, among others, were hilarious. I've read two other books by Boyd (Any Human Heart and The New Confessions) and they were more polished, but for a first novel, this was great.
Jessica
A very quick and enjoyable read about British colonialism in an invented African country in the 60s (? guessing, never really says). The main character is highly entertaining as a put-open, pessimistic, mid-level diplomat hoping for an assignment probably anywhere else. He is definitely not the 'good man in africa' of the title, but the book focuses on him wading through all of the bureaucracy and politics to discover that, despite his cynicism, this said good man does in fact exist. You're left A very quick and enjoyable read about British colonialism in an invented African country in the 60s (? guessing, never really says). The main character is highly entertaining as a put-open, pessimistic, mid-level diplomat hoping for an assignment probably anywhere else. He is definitely not the 'good man in africa' of the title, but the book focuses on him wading through all of the bureaucracy and politics to discover that, despite his cynicism, this said good man does in fact exist. You're left hoping that this flawed main character will become one as well.
Tathe1939
Martina, has no time and his daughter, Jenny, no interest, Thomas, an mellifluous man in the mid-forties, has resolved to adopt a relaxing skiing holiday in the Swiss Alps. Items drive more complicated than normal this year if they are became a member of by Sarah, his manager's daughter. Watch free film.
Karen
This was a fun read. Boyd spins a tale so unflattering to the British diplomats and yet probably closer to reality than one might guess. The smug arrogance of the Brits and their self-serving colonizing efforts told in a "Murphy's Law" story is just plain entertaining. I was confused for quite a while as I had assumed the good man to be the wrong character...I couldn't quite figure out how he was going to turn out being good! Well spun tale.
Becky Yamarik
entertaining funny book about british diplomats in West AFrica in the 1970s. The main character is this guy who's a failure and not a very good man, but still sort of likeable in a crazy way. He gets gonorrhea from his African girlfriend and has various other mishaps and gets blackmailed by an African politician. An easy and fun read. Was the first book by the author of "Any Human Heart" which is Michael from Books on the Nightstand's favorite book of all time. I must read that one now.
Kristine Morris
Good...oh good book. The first book I read and loved by William Boyd was Armadillo and this novel was written in a similar vein. The humourous escapades of a young man going about his career. Morgan's internal monologue's were bang on! I felt like I was reading about myself at points. I love how at one point Morgan admits that no matter what he did to extricate himself from his predicament he could only make things worse. Fun book!
Larry Scarzfava
Morgan Leafy is a self-centered, uncaring, cantankerous fool who seems to mis-read most situations he stumbles upon. But hey--there's a little bit of Morgan Leafy is all of us, and I found myself moving from loathing Leafy at times and then somehow liking him and wishing him well at others. And the writing is beautiful, the details of setting superbly portrayed, and the insight into the evils of British Imperialism quite remarkable. Overall--Boyd's first novel is well-worth reading!
Dan Pierce
It's good and at times very funny. But you need to be a fan of Boyd's "fish out of water" books (Stars and Bars, Armadillo, etc.) and be able to like unlikable characters to enjoy. With these narrators, I don't actually like them but I'm interested in what happens to them. But, this was his first novel and I'd recommend later ones before this. Stars and Bars is better. Or read Restless, one of his more recent ones which is very different and very good.
Peter Burton
An excellent comic novel,William Boyd's first and revealing an assured touch as he tells the tale of a white colonial government officer in a little African territory.Written in the style of Kingsley Amis in " Lucky Jim" about a man whose every effort to advance his career and help his superiors turns out badly.Well plotted,well written with quite a sad blow at the end making the title more poignant than expected.Possible politically incorrect for these days but very funny.
Linda A Janssen
The first William Boyd novel I read, and therefore the one that made me a fan. Morgan Leafy is such a buffoonish, pompous, overblown, awkward and unbelievably unlucky main character, you can't help but root for him to do the right thing despite his insistence on never doing so. Finding humor in such a bleak setting and depressing circumstances is a talent, and Boyd accurately skewers the British foreign office and indeed the entire colonial experience.
Elizabeth
Amusing books, especially as an expat in Africa. Certainly made me wonder a lot about the main character, Morgan Leafy- what was it about him? If he was as depressed and overweight and bumbling as he presented himself to be- how was it he ended up with so many women- Were they that desperate? Is that the nature of the "expat wives?" It was definitely a parody, but was it one of those that just hit a bit too close??? It will be an interesting book club discussion!!
Martha
Gosh, this was a funny book! Our anti-hero, Morgan Leafy, is everything that one hates in a man but somehow you want to cheer him on to better things - I became like his mom who believes that there is more to Morgan than meets the eye - something Morgan has to learn about other people too - the difference between seeming and being.
Andy
A tragicomedy novel set in a fictional African state where the bumbling British watch on as their ex-colonial, but now independent country, succumbs to election riots and an army backlash. Against this backdrop, Morgan Leafy gets laid, gets blackmailed, gets a nasty dose and gets to play the 'hero'. Funny and absurd and touching.
Rich
Basically a David Lodge book set in a backwater British diplomatic post in West Africa. A little less elegant than Lodge's best, or Kingsley Amis's average, but mixed in with the slapstick there's some political intrigue and a few keen observations about the role of foreigners in such places, and that pretty much makes up the difference.
John
Morgan Leafy is a minor British diplomat in a fictitious Africa country. He is in love with the bosses daughter, has a girlfriend and a mistress, is being blackmailed by a local politician, is ordered to get rid of a dead body (then put it back) and has to dress as Santa Claus at the Christmas party. Mayhem reigns supreme in this wacky and enjoyable book. I always enjoy Boyd's writing.
Getvoldsen
An inetent idiot in Africa would have been a more apt title. Give Morgan Leafy a 50/50 choice ad he will pick badly every time. The cover promised Uproariously (The Observer) or Wickedly (The Times) Funny, unless you find someones stupidity completely ruining their own and thise they encounters lives, don't expect any more than a grin. Would ve listed under tragedy had Shakespeare written it.
Aleksandra
Nice satire about lower rank diplomat posted at the forgotten town in forgotten country.
Mary
I wasn't sure I'd like this book when I first started. Happily I stuck with it and by the end I was laughing out loud in parts. William Boyd knows how to write.
Julianabadescu
3 1/2 stars actually...good, funny, poignant but not his best work...worth reading as enjoyable ...you will embrace main character for his failures
Pam
I almost gave up on this book, but am very glad that I didn't. A funny, witty, insightful read. Having spent time doing teaching in a third world country, I found this tale spot on.
Arthur
Excellent novel. William Boyd has a gift for words and plot. I laughed until tears came. People sitting next to me on the pane asked what i was reading.
Peg
Hard to drag through. I finally gave up about 1/3 in.
Henry
One of my favorite books, read first in 90s, reread in 2007.
Raegan Butcher
This reads like a sort of Graham Greene type book. How's that for a vaguely worded review?
Booknblues
A story of a misguided British diplomat in a small African nation
Thomas
hilarious - every other comment would be a plagiarism and/or a spoiler
Isaw
still fresh even though its 30 years old
Jane
Great holiday read enjoyable and a bit silly. Morgan Leafy is a character that although completely unlikeable is somewhat endearing especially in his Santa suit.
Patrick
3.5 really. It's an enjoyable enough read, although I couldn't help but think that Graham Greene had covered very similar territory to better effect with Our Man in Havana
Pam
Excellent writing and a great story. Another good book by William Boyd.
Jackoriah
I loved this book. I've yet to read a book by William Boyd that I didn't like. The man can spin a great story that keeps you reading late into the night. This particular book was hysterical.
Miranda
It took me until Part 2 to get into the book, but then I really didn't care what happened to any of the characters. I laughed and will probably forget soon.
Deanne
Loved reading as Morgan Leafy's life unravelled, with every action only seeming to make things worse.
Randolph Breschini
Funny...but I'm sure it's true about the foreign service...
Elise Hamilton
Both sad and funny. In fact, parts were downright hysterical. At one point I was laughing so hard I was crying. The protagonist gets into some of the most incredible situations.
Suze
Truly enjoyed this book, as well as Boyd's style of writing.
J Deurloo
My first and still the best book of William Boyd. Enjoyed this in high school, never lost the joy of reading.
Stephanie
Honestly, all those people who reviewed it and said it was hilarious? Maybe I read the wrong book. I only slogged through the whole thing because I kept waiting for it to get better. Bleh.
James M
This comic novel follows a bumbling British low ranking official as his life in Africa begins to go very wrong.
Peter Stafford-Bow
Some good laughs at the expense of whitey, featuring the frequently engorged protagonist, a diplomat, blundering around a fictional West African country in a state of incompetent lust.
Ann Ewasechko
a fun and easy read. Some great characters.
Glynis
Thought it was going to be a bit turgid but really enjoying it now. Shall I watch Top Gear or read Good Man in Africa - no choice - Good Man in Africa it is.
Christina
Hilarious! I couldn't stop reading this, it was incredibly funny. Loved it!
Nicole Froio
funny and smart. the main character is despicable and i wanted him to end up in a bad way! funny though.
Jacob
I thought my life was a bit rough here. Then I read this guy's story and his drama-filled life. Made me laugh quite a few times.
Rael
Funny, starts slow, but then it cracked me up..
Ivy Bedworth
It was funny, but I wouldn't say hilariously so. A quick read in an afternoon.
Commander Law
Well, amusing in places, cringe-worthy in others. Had to keep reading it but wanted it to end.
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