Finding George Orwell in Burma Book Cover
A fascinating political travelogue that traces the life and work of George Orwell in Southeast Asia

Over the years the American writer Emma Larkin has spent traveling in Burma, also known as Myanmar, she's come to know all too well the many ways this brutal police state can be described as "Orwellian." The life of the mind exists in a state of siege in Burma, and it long has. But Burma's connection to George Orwell is not merely metaphorical; it is much deeper and more real. Orwell's mother was born in Burma, at the height of the British raj, and Orwell was fundamentally shaped by his experiences in Burma as a young man working for the British Imperial Police. When Orwell died, the novel-in-progress on his desk was set in Burma. It is the place George Orwell's work holds in Burma today, however, that most struck Emma Larkin. She was frequently told by Burmese acquaintances that Orwell did not write one book about their country - his first novel, Burmese Days - but in fact he wrote three, the "trilogy" that included Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. When Larkin quietly asked one Burmese intellectual if he knew the work of George Orwell, he stared blankly for a moment and then said, "Ah, you mean the prophet!"

In one of the most intrepid political travelogues in recent memory, Emma Larkin tells of the year she spent traveling through Burma using the life and work of George Orwell as her compass. Going from Mandalay and Rangoon to poor delta backwaters and up to the old hill-station towns in the mountains of Burma's far north, Larkin visits the places where Orwell worked and lived, and the places his books live still. She brings to vivid life a country and a people cut off from the rest of the world, and from one another, by the ruling military junta and its vast network of spies and informers. Using Orwell enables her to show, effortlessly, the weight of the colonial experience on Burma today, the ghosts of which are invisible and everywhere. More important, she finds that the path she charts leads her to the people who have found ways to somehow resist the soul-crushing effects of life in this most cruel police state. And George Orwell's moral clarity, hatred of injustice, and keen powers of observation serve as the author's compass in another sense too: they are qualities she shares and they suffuse her book - the keenest and finest reckoning with life in this police state that has yet been written.
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 70
20
34
14
2
0
Looking for Finding George Orwell in Burma in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

Finding George Orwell in Burma Reviews

Sheila Nielson
I read this book because we were traveling to Burma and I wanted some history. Interesting.
Sean Holland
A book about George Orwell in Burma that's way better than George Orwell's book about Burma.
Portia
Super interesting read. Props to the author for her courageous work in shedding light on the stories Burma's military regime has made every effort to erase.
Solved: The Riddle of Illness :: Secret Agent X-9 :: Fancies and Goodnights :: His Monkey Wife :: Of Wee Sweetie Mice and Men
Jacob Wren
I wasn't prepared to like this book. I teach Animal Farm, and occasionally teach 1984. I don't always teach Animal Farm with precisely the historical allegory that I was taught, because I think my students can understand bullies, violence, passive aggressiveness, and when rule making goes horribly awry, even if they don't always understand it in a historical context. Reading Finding George Orwell in Burma validated how I teach Animal Farm, because it is so much more than just one allegory.

In Bur I wasn't prepared to like this book. I teach Animal Farm, and occasionally teach 1984. I don't always teach Animal Farm with precisely the historical allegory that I was taught, because I think my students can understand bullies, violence, passive aggressiveness, and when rule making goes horribly awry, even if they don't always understand it in a historical context. Reading Finding George Orwell in Burma validated how I teach Animal Farm, because it is so much more than just one allegory.

In Burma, Animal Farm and 1984 are banned. George Orwell is referred to as a prophet. Three books; Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984 are either about Burma directly (The first) or hypothesized what would happen under the militaristic Burmese government (The second and third). The more the story unfolded, and Emma Larkin went searching for details about George Orwell's time in Burma, the more the story drifted into this weird magical reality. It never got there, the book is non-fiction, but the writing took on that quality.

It is hard as someone who grew up in America, who doesn't read a lot of non-fiction, who worries about things so close to herself and not outside the world to read this book and not try to make it into magical realism. I don't deny my own ignorance in these matters, in fact, I can't think of enough unflattering terms to describe my cluelessness. Trying to put this book into context, the way we do when we read, was a struggle. The words, the language, it was familiar to me in terms of fantasy novels.

How can that much violence, that much conspiracy, that much horror exist in the world and have people surviving and thriving in so many ways? How does one help to remediate what goes on there, or focus on what goes on here, or do anything? Do I take this book at face value, let it hold in my brain and move on? Should I continue to pursue what was happening? It left me in knots and I want to do something with all the knowledge that I gained, all the stories told. More than just find George Orwell in Burma.

This book was amazing, and unlike most that I read. I know this isn't much of a review, more of a reaction, but it's the best way to document my thoughts around the book. I'm grateful that my book club picked this.
Alissa McCarthy
I found this book in a shop in the Bangkok airport. I'm a fan of Orwell and knowing next to nothing about Burma I thought I would give it a try. It did not disappoint. Burma's connection to George Orwell is not merely metaphorical; it is much deeper and more real. Orwell's mother was born in Burma, at the height of the British raj, and Orwell was fundamentally shaped by his experiences in Burma as a young man working for the British Imperial Police. When Orwell died, the novel-in-progress on his I found this book in a shop in the Bangkok airport. I'm a fan of Orwell and knowing next to nothing about Burma I thought I would give it a try. It did not disappoint. Burma's connection to George Orwell is not merely metaphorical; it is much deeper and more real. Orwell's mother was born in Burma, at the height of the British raj, and Orwell was fundamentally shaped by his experiences in Burma as a young man working for the British Imperial Police. When Orwell died, the novel-in-progress on his desk was set in Burma. It is the place George Orwell's work holds in Burma today, however, that most struck Emma Larkin. She was frequently told by Burmese acquaintances that Orwell did not write one book about their country - his first novel, Burmese Days - but in fact he wrote three, the "trilogy" that included Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. When Larkin quietly asked one Burmese intellectual if he knew the work of George Orwell, he stared blankly for a moment and then said, "Ah, you mean the prophet!"

In this political travelogue, Larkin tells of the year she spent traveling through Burma using the life and work of George Orwell as her compass. Going from Mandalay and Rangoon to poor delta backwaters and up to the old hill-station towns in the mountains of Burma's far north, Larkin visits the places where Orwell worked and lived, and the places his books live still. She brings to vivid life a country and a people cut off from the rest of the world, and from one another, by the ruling military junta and its vast network of spies and informers. Using Orwell enables her to show, effortlessly, the weight of the colonial experience on Burma today, the ghosts of which are invisible and everywhere. More important, she finds that the path she charts leads her to the people who have found ways to somehow resist the soul-crushing effects of life in this most cruel police state. And George Orwell's moral clarity, hatred of injustice, and keen powers of observation serve as the author's compass in another sense too: they are qualities she shares and they suffuse her book - the keenest and finest reckoning with life in this police state that has yet been written.
Subvert
After The Trouser People this was the second book I read in Burma about Burma. This book was actually my preferred choice, but I couldn't find it in Bangkok before going to Burma. Finding "Finding George Orwell in Burma" in Burma took me a while and was quite difficult, but not as impossible as you would think after reading the book. It is crazy how different I experienced Burma than the writers of these two books barely 8-10 years ago. At times the country now feels annoyingly touristic and esp After The Trouser People this was the second book I read in Burma about Burma. This book was actually my preferred choice, but I couldn't find it in Bangkok before going to Burma. Finding "Finding George Orwell in Burma" in Burma took me a while and was quite difficult, but not as impossible as you would think after reading the book. It is crazy how different I experienced Burma than the writers of these two books barely 8-10 years ago. At times the country now feels annoyingly touristic and especially in the last half year there have been some big changes (lets see how permanent they will be...), so books like this are now sold more and more and people started speaking out publicly more often. The bookshop owner of Hsipaw was delighted when I told him this book was now openly sold in Yangon, which means he could start selling it too. When visiting Burma today you won't be as much hassled as Emma Larkin was while writing the book.

Still reading the book in teashops in Burma is sometimes a bit of a surreal experience. The book works well, the Burmese joke (/prophecy) on how Orwell ended up writing three books about Burma is cruelly funny. And I'm sold to the basic premise that Burma did a lot more to change and shape Orwell's future outlook on life than generally understood. The idea of writing about Burma using Orwell generally works rather well and better than I expected. Although, the author does not really end up finding all that much of Orwell himself in Burma.

As for books about Burma, I slightly prefer the Trouser People to this one, even though I've always been a big fan of George Orwell. But if you're more interested in George Orwell rather than Burma, the choice should be clear.
David
This book is quite unique, and I found it compelling and fascinating. Emma Larkin is a pseudonym. She lives in Burma (Myanmar) and writes under an assumed name to avoid trouble with the authorities. Her premise is that George Orwell (also a pseudonym, used by Eric Blair) was deeply influenced by his stay in Burma as a young man in the British military. She is struck by the parallels between Burmese history and Orwell's writing in three specific books (Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984). She do This book is quite unique, and I found it compelling and fascinating. Emma Larkin is a pseudonym. She lives in Burma (Myanmar) and writes under an assumed name to avoid trouble with the authorities. Her premise is that George Orwell (also a pseudonym, used by Eric Blair) was deeply influenced by his stay in Burma as a young man in the British military. She is struck by the parallels between Burmese history and Orwell's writing in three specific books (Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984). She does an excellent job of tracing the development of Orwell's outlook as shaped by his experiences in Burma and as reflected in his writing.

(I re-read 1984 at the same time, and as many times as I have read it in the past there were large sections of it that gained an entirely different flavor after learning more about Burma and it's experience under it's modern military rulers.)

I noted in an earlier comment that this book is hard to categorize; it is equal parts literary biography, political history, cultural history and travelogue. That may sound like a hodgepodge, but it works beautifully and drew me into a deep interest in this society (one that I knew next to nothing about previously).

An added bonus for me, personally, was the juxtaposition between British imperial times and the modern day. I enjoy historical writing, but I especially enjoy writing that involves the PASSAGE of time. This technique was particularly powerful in this book due to the extreme differences between the country before, during and after British rule.

I don't have a clue where to shelve this book in my library, but I'm so glad I read it and I highly recommend it!
Kristine
Written under a pseudonym by necessity, Finding George Orwell in Burma is the author's travelogue through present-day Burma, tracing the path George Orwell followed in his career as British military police in 1920's Burma. Under the pretense of studying British architecture the author travels through Mandalay, the Delta, Rangoon, Moulmein, and Katha (the setting in George Orwell's first novel Burmese Days), conversing with locals in tea shops and gently probing for inside information in secretiv Written under a pseudonym by necessity, Finding George Orwell in Burma is the author's travelogue through present-day Burma, tracing the path George Orwell followed in his career as British military police in 1920's Burma. Under the pretense of studying British architecture the author travels through Mandalay, the Delta, Rangoon, Moulmein, and Katha (the setting in George Orwell's first novel Burmese Days), conversing with locals in tea shops and gently probing for inside information in secretive meetings with various students, professors, and booksellers. Even behind closed doors residents of Burma (called Myanmar after the name of the military junta in control) are very reluctant to talk about anything less innocuous than the weather. Any talk of democracy or the slightest hint of criticism of the government can result in interrogation by torture and years of imprisonment. The author notes that tourists visiting Burma aren't likely to see the true conditions and oppresssion and fear in the country as everything is censored and under watchful eye. A joke is made that George Orwell wrote, not one, but three novels about Burma: Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984, and throughout the book the author links passages of 1984 with conditions in Burma. The author is never able to gain access to parts of Burma forbidden to foreigners and is only able to gain the slightest of inside information from the Burmans; nonetheless, the author's extensive knowledge of the country and research on George Orwell from outside sources offers readers a compelling glimpse of Burma today as well as the Burma George Orwell knew.
M. Lee
Emma Larkin retraces the footsteps of George Orwell during his long stint with the British Imperial Police during the waning years of British colonialism in Burma, which was formerly part of the British Raj. Most of Orwell's writings are banned in the country, and he is seen as a prophetic figure among both the Burmese intelligentsia, as well as common folk. Burma is a modern police state, despite a slowly changing political landscape in which the once closed-off society is slowly being opened u Emma Larkin retraces the footsteps of George Orwell during his long stint with the British Imperial Police during the waning years of British colonialism in Burma, which was formerly part of the British Raj. Most of Orwell's writings are banned in the country, and he is seen as a prophetic figure among both the Burmese intelligentsia, as well as common folk. Burma is a modern police state, despite a slowly changing political landscape in which the once closed-off society is slowly being opened up to the rest of the world for the first time in half a century. I recently completed anthropological fieldwork in Burma, during an extended stay in Southeast Asia. After returning to the U.S., I have found it rather difficult to readjust to comfortable American life, and reconcile the things I saw and experienced in everyday life in Burma. My professor recommended this book to me, and it has been a coping mechanism for myself, as Emma Larkin has had many similar experiences that I had, particularly her many run-ins with the authorities, listening to the horrific stories of local people who have suffered at the hands of their own government and military, and also being a Westerner trying to transverse the complex and at times chaotic landscape of Burma, with all it's contradictions, layers of history, and it's unrivaled beauty. Through it all, the resilience of the Burmese people, and their enduring passion for life, manage to shine through even the greatest of oppression. This book is a must for anyone embarking on any kind of research or fieldwork in the world's less-travelled countries.
Keith McCormick
This book opens the door to a side of Burma that most don't get to see. I visited Burma recently for a tourism visit. I read this book in preparation. Since much of the narrative is in historical terms, I didn't, at first, get a sense of what to expect. Only on my return did I realize that it gave me a much richer experience than I otherwise would have had. It is an often beautiful book. I got to see a number of the places that are mentioned in the book, but I frequently recalled her description This book opens the door to a side of Burma that most don't get to see. I visited Burma recently for a tourism visit. I read this book in preparation. Since much of the narrative is in historical terms, I didn't, at first, get a sense of what to expect. Only on my return did I realize that it gave me a much richer experience than I otherwise would have had. It is an often beautiful book. I got to see a number of the places that are mentioned in the book, but I frequently recalled her descriptions, rich with historical context, when I was there.

What I gained from reading this book before my visit was to sit-in on the conversations that the author had with both seemingly ordinary and some extraordinary Burmese. Not knowing the language, and being a casual visitor, I wouldn't have dreamed of talking politics when I was there. This book is hardly a journalistic contemporary history piece, but the author asked all the questions of ordinary people that you would want to ask, but can't. Burma is an exceptionally beautiful place, but I was always conscious that I was seeing only what tourists are allowed to see. There was no obvious evidence of the horrible events of just a few months ago, but armed with the author's experiences I could better see what was around me.

The parallel narrative involving Orwell was quite effective. It made me want to reread Animal Farm, and seek out Burmese Days. For potential visitors to Burma, I would also recommend The Trouser People: A Story of Burma in the Shadow of the Empire
Doug
Reading about Burma is a guilty pleasure for me. Descriptions of it, like my favorite scene in literature— Pip's first visit to Ms. Havisham's house—are always of a place where time has stopped, of decay and beauty touched with horror. I love to read about travelers exploring the remains of this place, yet realize that what for me is romantic and foreign is a cruel reality for millions of people oppressed by the country's military. This book indulged completely my appetite for the strange and me Reading about Burma is a guilty pleasure for me. Descriptions of it, like my favorite scene in literature— Pip's first visit to Ms. Havisham's house—are always of a place where time has stopped, of decay and beauty touched with horror. I love to read about travelers exploring the remains of this place, yet realize that what for me is romantic and foreign is a cruel reality for millions of people oppressed by the country's military. This book indulged completely my appetite for the strange and melancholy, as the author unearths forgotten colonist gravestones and wanders through the skeletons of once fine homes, while continuously returning to the Orwellian conditions of the present day. Emma Larkin (her pen name) spent a year in the country loosely following the path of George Orwell, who worked there as a police office before becoming an author. Her main theme is that Orwell's writings, particularly 1984, eerily mirror the stifling, paranoid atmosphere of Burma today. This idea alone is a little too thin to remain interesting, but in pursuing it she ends up piecing together a fascinating portrait of Orwell. The writing itself is lovely, painting a sunlit, ghostly land of milky tea and sad cafes, and is enough to sustain the book even without much forward momentum. The author, who takes considerable risks in her journey, clearly loves Burma, and her sincerity adds something immeasurable to the story.
Heather
I finally finished reading Emma Larkin's book, Finding George Orwell in Burma. Although I haven't been to Burma, and don't know if I ever will with the current state of affairs, Larkin captured a familiar tropical atmosphere.

I have only read 1984 of all of Orwell's writing, so I was grateful that she did such a good job of quoting relevant passages for context. She also shared her fascinating research into Orwell's personal history in Burma. Sometimes I was confused whether the texts cited were I finally finished reading Emma Larkin's book, Finding George Orwell in Burma. Although I haven't been to Burma, and don't know if I ever will with the current state of affairs, Larkin captured a familiar tropical atmosphere.

I have only read 1984 of all of Orwell's writing, so I was grateful that she did such a good job of quoting relevant passages for context. She also shared her fascinating research into Orwell's personal history in Burma. Sometimes I was confused whether the texts cited were fiction or non-fiction, but clearly there were a lot of autobiographical details even in Orwell's fiction about Burma. And, as Larkin points out, a bit of fiction in his biographical tales as well.

I don't know whether he was prescient or whether the Burmese generals use Animal Farm and 1984 as models from which to run the country. It's disturbing to see the parallels between Burma's history and Orwell's dystopian vision.

Interestingly, Tamisha pointed out that the book was originally published under a different title and a different author--Secret Histories by John Murray. The copyright is under the name of Emma Larkin, though according to Wikipedia, this is also a pseudonym for an American journalist living in Bangkok. She's gone to great lengths to protect the identities of her friends and sources and herself.
Mary
While I'm not sure the book's main thread - the author tries to draw a connection between the military dictatorship that has ruled Burma/Myanmar for the last four decades and the dystopian visions of Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm - is much more than a good excuse to write a travelogue, this book is a fascinating glimpse into a world to which few outsiders have had access.

"Emma Larkin" is a pseudonym for a British journalist who surely would have been kicked out of the country had she revealed h While I'm not sure the book's main thread - the author tries to draw a connection between the military dictatorship that has ruled Burma/Myanmar for the last four decades and the dystopian visions of Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm - is much more than a good excuse to write a travelogue, this book is a fascinating glimpse into a world to which few outsiders have had access.

"Emma Larkin" is a pseudonym for a British journalist who surely would have been kicked out of the country had she revealed her profession. She visits various sites around Burma/Myanmar where Orwell was posted during his five years as an officer in the British Imperial Police Force. I was struck most by the everyday methods the Burmese people have developed to cope with their government's oppression, constant surveillance and generally astounding knack for running their country into the ground. She makes an effective case for the effect of years of British colonial rule on the current political situation in Myanmar/Burma, and for the impact of five years in the British imperial corps on the young writer Orwell.

Unless you, like "Emma," are fluent in both Burmese and at subtly breaking the code that obscures genuine thoughts and opinions among the Burmese people, this book seems about as close to a real picture of the country as any of us could get.
Natapong Nimkarnjana
I read other books from the authors who once lived in Burma and I myself went there before and what I can say is many parts in this book about life in Burma is not true. They don't have freedom as many country but their life is not that bad. Even the market in the small village is always full of people buying and selling things. Life of people in the countryside is not different with the other country in SEA. The book tell us that the officer salary is very very cheap and not enough to buy food. I read other books from the authors who once lived in Burma and I myself went there before and what I can say is many parts in this book about life in Burma is not true. They don't have freedom as many country but their life is not that bad. Even the market in the small village is always full of people buying and selling things. Life of people in the countryside is not different with the other country in SEA. The book tell us that the officer salary is very very cheap and not enough to buy food. That is ridiculous, go and see Burmese people buying things with yourself and you will know that it's true or not. It is the imagination through the western eyes of the author.
ตามรอยออร์เวลล์แค่ไม่มาก หนักๆ ออกไปทางวิจารณ์การเมืองพม่าซะมากกว่า หลายบทหลายตอนเหมือนจินตนาการนิยายเผด็จการจากมุมมองเดิมๆ ของชาติตะวันตก เช่น คนพม่าต้องเข้าแถวรอปันส่วนอาหาร ?? มั่วชัดๆ ขนาดบ้านนอก ชนบทเมืองเล็กๆ มันก็มีร้านชำขายกันปกติแบบบ้านเรานี่ละ รายได้ตำรวจเดือนละแค่หลักร้อย ?? ถ้าไปพม่าเองจะรู้ว่าเป็นไปไม่ได้เลย เดินเข้าไปกินก๊วยเตี๋ยวร้านเดียวกับคนพม่าก็ไม่ได้ถูกขนาดนั้น (ร้านข้างทางแบบที่มีแต่ลูกค้าพม่าด้วยซ้ำ จ่ายราคาเท่ากันด้วยไม่ได้บวกราคานักท่องเที่ยว) นั่งสามล้อถีบไม่กี่เที่ยววันเดียวก็โดนเป็นร้อยหละ ดูๆ แล้วข้อมูลที่ได้มาบางส่วนเป็นข้อมูลที่คนที่เธอไปสัมภาษณ์ต้องการใช้ผู้เขียนให้เขียนเพื่อประโยชน์แก่พวกเขามากกว่าที่จะเป็นความจริงทั้งหมด
Jaya
Emma Larkin delves into Burma's history in this book to trace the inspiration behind George Orwell's writing, particularly 1984 and Burmese Days. She believes that the five years he spent there as part of the imperial British administration shaped his ideas, making his books seem almost like portents of the atmosphere in present-day Myanmar. Larkin's actions are monitored, and most people are reluctant to open up out of fear - there is a sense of constantly being watched, of needing to look over Emma Larkin delves into Burma's history in this book to trace the inspiration behind George Orwell's writing, particularly 1984 and Burmese Days. She believes that the five years he spent there as part of the imperial British administration shaped his ideas, making his books seem almost like portents of the atmosphere in present-day Myanmar. Larkin's actions are monitored, and most people are reluctant to open up out of fear - there is a sense of constantly being watched, of needing to look over your shoulder.

Larkin's prose is beautiful. Her descriptions of the Burmese landscape bring tropical settings alive. However, there is a certain predictability in her writing, almost to the point of making it tedious after a while. With the setting established, I don't need to be told about the betel quads being sold at tea shops in every village she visits - I really enjoyed the descriptions, but they didn't always fit in. I understand that Larkin is going to have few productive decisions in an atmosphere of heavy censorship and that she will have to piece her theories together from fragments reluctantly imparted to her. This reflects the situation in Myanmar today, but I do wish the chapters were kept crisp and not always padded out with descriptions that sounded really familiar.
Nick Olson
I recently took a few months off work, and did quite a bit of traveling, including Thailand and Laos, near Burma, just after the terrible violence against the monks and peaceful protesters there.

On my way out of town, I had grabbed a copy of 1984 to read, but I had no idea that George Orwell had a long history with Burma. My friends in Thailand, seeing my copy of 1984, told me about Orwell's history there, and loaned me a copy of this book to read.

The people of Burma consider Orwell a prophet, a I recently took a few months off work, and did quite a bit of traveling, including Thailand and Laos, near Burma, just after the terrible violence against the monks and peaceful protesters there.

On my way out of town, I had grabbed a copy of 1984 to read, but I had no idea that George Orwell had a long history with Burma. My friends in Thailand, seeing my copy of 1984, told me about Orwell's history there, and loaned me a copy of this book to read.

The people of Burma consider Orwell a prophet, and his books are known as the trilogy: Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984 represent the history of the country to them, from British colonization through the current regime's uprising (the pigs taking over the farm) to 1984's eerily accurate description of the government's abuse of power today.

I was fascinated by the connection between Burma and Orwell, and the author's ability to describe Burmese life as she saw it when tracing Orwell's career. There is an amazing amount of desire, intelligence, and joy in the Burmese people that is dying under the dark shadow of the military government there. As sad as the state of things is, I am exceptionally grateful to be learning about it, with this book as the perfect first step.
Sam
Emma Larkin invites readers into a place where they can no longer tread: Myanmar at its autocratic nadir. Guided by George Orwell's career as a colonial police officer, Larkin travels through remote villages and the mildewed grandeur of Rangoon. In every corner of the country, Larkin encounters the omnipresent police/military state imagined by Orwell in 1984. Civilians are reluctant to talk and are never named for fear of reprisal; informants and police officials lope along in the background, pr Emma Larkin invites readers into a place where they can no longer tread: Myanmar at its autocratic nadir. Guided by George Orwell's career as a colonial police officer, Larkin travels through remote villages and the mildewed grandeur of Rangoon. In every corner of the country, Larkin encounters the omnipresent police/military state imagined by Orwell in 1984. Civilians are reluctant to talk and are never named for fear of reprisal; informants and police officials lope along in the background, providing a frustrating undercurrent to Larkin's every initiative.

Finding George Orwell in Burma does well to overcome the redundancy of its setting. Each location serves a purpose and connects us into the broader course of Orwell's evolution from enraptured Eatonian to liberal writer. Larkin reminds readers that none of Orwell's novels conclude happily, and Larkin's own Burmese storyline ends with the violent disappearance of Aung San Suu Kyi. Orwell's novels met their dyspeptic ends, but time has carried Myanmar and its inhabitants into a happier, though uncertain, denouement.
Annie
This was a Christmas present Drew gave to me two years ago...and I finally got a chance to pick it up. I'm glad! I really have a creepy fascination about George Orwell (I especially love 1984 and Animal Farm), so the premise of this book was great for me. While writing as essentially a travel journal, the author connects Orwell's time in Burma in the 1920s as a colonial policeman for the British government to his writing about totalitarian rule. I didn't realize it but Burma (even today) has one This was a Christmas present Drew gave to me two years ago...and I finally got a chance to pick it up. I'm glad! I really have a creepy fascination about George Orwell (I especially love 1984 and Animal Farm), so the premise of this book was great for me. While writing as essentially a travel journal, the author connects Orwell's time in Burma in the 1920s as a colonial policeman for the British government to his writing about totalitarian rule. I didn't realize it but Burma (even today) has one of the most oppressive and terrible rulers in the world - in the novel she highlights how hard it is even to get into Burma and how scared the Burmese are about speaking out against the government. I really found the ideas in this book interesting, although I got a little tired of the author's crusading analysis and seemingly fearless actions while in the country. She writes over and over about how people are locked up in government prisons for minor offenses and then proceeds to commit those same offenses...bloody Americans. Anyway, I liked this book and would recommend it, especially if you like 1984 and/or Animal Farm.
Ryan
To those familiar with both Orwell's works and Burmese history/politics, the themes in this book will also be quite familiar. However, what made me enjoy this book so much was the aspect that is so hard to find when it comes to Burma; real-life personal stories. In a country where it is so hard to transmit information, both internally and externally, Larkin manages to bring to light a collection of stories and facts gathered from everyday people who otherwise have no means of conveying their lif To those familiar with both Orwell's works and Burmese history/politics, the themes in this book will also be quite familiar. However, what made me enjoy this book so much was the aspect that is so hard to find when it comes to Burma; real-life personal stories. In a country where it is so hard to transmit information, both internally and externally, Larkin manages to bring to light a collection of stories and facts gathered from everyday people who otherwise have no means of conveying their life to the outside world. With my upcoming trip to Burma under 2 months away, this book painted quite a vivid picture of the streets and scenes to expect. Thoroughly recommend.
Karen Floyd
Early in the book the author says, "In Burma there is a joke that Orwell wrote not just one novel about the country, but three: a trilogy comprised of "Burmese Days," "Animal Farm," and "Nineteen Eighty-Four." After reading this book I have to agree with her. But, unlike Orwell's novels, Larkin's book left me with the faint hope that someday, somehow, things might change. I am very cynical about the current changes in Burma - temporary window dressing to receive certain concessions from outside Early in the book the author says, "In Burma there is a joke that Orwell wrote not just one novel about the country, but three: a trilogy comprised of "Burmese Days," "Animal Farm," and "Nineteen Eighty-Four." After reading this book I have to agree with her. But, unlike Orwell's novels, Larkin's book left me with the faint hope that someday, somehow, things might change. I am very cynical about the current changes in Burma - temporary window dressing to receive certain concessions from outside is my belief - though I would be very happy to be proven wrong. The war and barbarities against the ethnic minorities, such as the Katchins and the Karens, has not let up at all, however.
Donna
Larkin, a pseudonym to protect her friends in Burma, entertwines two stories well:
1. George Orwell's years in Burma as a policeman for the British and how those experiences influenced the rest of his life and all of his writings, along with
2. How the modern dictatorial history of Burma follows the dismal happenings of Nineteen eighty-four.
It was wrenching to lie lazily on my sofa reading how desperate people in Burma are to read anything other than government propaganda, how ancient, tattered m Larkin, a pseudonym to protect her friends in Burma, entertwines two stories well:
1. George Orwell's years in Burma as a policeman for the British and how those experiences influenced the rest of his life and all of his writings, along with
2. How the modern dictatorial history of Burma follows the dismal happenings of Nineteen eighty-four.
It was wrenching to lie lazily on my sofa reading how desperate people in Burma are to read anything other than government propaganda, how ancient, tattered magazines and books are secretly traded. How often do I experience the rich gift I have daily to read any and everything I want? No one living in Burma has that gift.
SP
My friend in the diplomatic service dissed this - so of course I have to check it out. So far, a few pages in, it's pretty inoffensive. But not particularly insightful. Seems to be pitched at the level of someone knows nothing about Burma. Hmm. Let's see how this goes.
Finishing this book, my opinion hasn't changed. Mildly interesting, but not very deep. And a bit suspect. It's all very well for Brave White Foreigner to read into Downtrodden Natives' refusal to discuss politics all manner of diab My friend in the diplomatic service dissed this - so of course I have to check it out. So far, a few pages in, it's pretty inoffensive. But not particularly insightful. Seems to be pitched at the level of someone knows nothing about Burma. Hmm. Let's see how this goes.
Finishing this book, my opinion hasn't changed. Mildly interesting, but not very deep. And a bit suspect. It's all very well for Brave White Foreigner to read into Downtrodden Natives' refusal to discuss politics all manner of diabolical oppressions - But how do I know they just don't want to talk about politics, or maybe they just don't want to diss their country to a nosy white foreigner? Hmph.
Alana
Read this right after reading 1984 for the first time (I somehow missed this in middle school/high school - how did that happen?). I am glad I read them back to back, this was a very interesting picture of Burma intertwined with some history of George Orwell's time there. When I read 1984 I kept thinking how eerily similar it was to a book about living in North Korea, and this was the same. I'm curious to know what, if anything, has really changed in Burma since it has been supposedly democratiz Read this right after reading 1984 for the first time (I somehow missed this in middle school/high school - how did that happen?). I am glad I read them back to back, this was a very interesting picture of Burma intertwined with some history of George Orwell's time there. When I read 1984 I kept thinking how eerily similar it was to a book about living in North Korea, and this was the same. I'm curious to know what, if anything, has really changed in Burma since it has been supposedly democratized in the last few years.
Stacie
This book is a quick read and an excellent starting point to learn about the political history of Burma and the horribly oppressive regime in power. The author wasn't quite able to tie it all together when trying to focus on George Orwell's years in the country during British colonization as a focal point in exploring the tragic political history of Burma. Naturally, given the topic, the book left me feeling a bit powerless and sad regarding the state of the country. I was left with little hope This book is a quick read and an excellent starting point to learn about the political history of Burma and the horribly oppressive regime in power. The author wasn't quite able to tie it all together when trying to focus on George Orwell's years in the country during British colonization as a focal point in exploring the tragic political history of Burma. Naturally, given the topic, the book left me feeling a bit powerless and sad regarding the state of the country. I was left with little hope that I could do anything to contribute to changing the political situation...
Amanda
I'm going to pull a Christina here and give this 3.5 stars. I liked it well enough. I found the prose nice enough. I thought the content was interesting enough. The description of modern day Burma (which, I'll be honest, I've never thought much about) was compelling, but I thought the author's connections between Burma today and Orwell were strained. Maybe I just don't like travelogues? Or maybe I'm just convinced that similarities between Orwell's novels and the current state of Burmese affairs I'm going to pull a Christina here and give this 3.5 stars. I liked it well enough. I found the prose nice enough. I thought the content was interesting enough. The description of modern day Burma (which, I'll be honest, I've never thought much about) was compelling, but I thought the author's connections between Burma today and Orwell were strained. Maybe I just don't like travelogues? Or maybe I'm just convinced that similarities between Orwell's novels and the current state of Burmese affairs is a coincidence and not evidence of George's prophetic powers.
Thing Two
I never knew George Orwell lived in Burma (now Myanmar), but Emma Larkin travelled there researching - without the approval of the Myanmar government - where he lived, what he did, and spoke with those who knew him, or of him, then. Her belief, and the belief of those with whom she spoke, is that Orwell's books Animal Farm and 1984 were part of a trilogy which began with his Burmese Days and were all about his experiences in Burma, not Russia as is commonly accepted. An interesting literar I never knew George Orwell lived in Burma (now Myanmar), but Emma Larkin travelled there researching - without the approval of the Myanmar government - where he lived, what he did, and spoke with those who knew him, or of him, then. Her belief, and the belief of those with whom she spoke, is that Orwell's books Animal Farm and 1984 were part of a trilogy which began with his Burmese Days and were all about his experiences in Burma, not Russia as is commonly accepted. An interesting literary/travel novel about a country few people know anything about - by design.
kaitlyn
I liked this book. It's been on my shelf for a while, and I thought it was about time I read it. I bought it for two reasons: (1) I liked the cover and (2) Joseph had just gone on an Orwell frenzy—he bought like every book Orwell wrote—so I thought this would be an interesting addition to the collection. I was right. It was really interesting insight into Orwell's life and writing and the situation in Burma. In the middle of reading the book I wondered what other people did after they finish. I I liked this book. It's been on my shelf for a while, and I thought it was about time I read it. I bought it for two reasons: (1) I liked the cover and (2) Joseph had just gone on an Orwell frenzy—he bought like every book Orwell wrote—so I thought this would be an interesting addition to the collection. I was right. It was really interesting insight into Orwell's life and writing and the situation in Burma. In the middle of reading the book I wondered what other people did after they finish. I felt like I should be doing something to help the situation in Burma, but what can I do?
Rebecca Johnson
I read this book in anticipation of a trip to Burma. I don't imagine the Burma I'll see on my guided tour will be anything like the wonderfully in-depth look the author takes at Burmese places and people. I also loved the structure of the book, her journey around the places in Burma Orwell lived and looking for his story as the story of modern Burma unfolded. The edition I read had a post-script from January 2011, and I'd love to hear the author's stories from a Burma that I hope is now changing I read this book in anticipation of a trip to Burma. I don't imagine the Burma I'll see on my guided tour will be anything like the wonderfully in-depth look the author takes at Burmese places and people. I also loved the structure of the book, her journey around the places in Burma Orwell lived and looking for his story as the story of modern Burma unfolded. The edition I read had a post-script from January 2011, and I'd love to hear the author's stories from a Burma that I hope is now changing for the better.
Robert
It is ominous to think of Orwell's unintentional trilogy about Burma: Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984. This concept lies at the heart of Emma Larkin's (a pseudonym) Finding George Orwell in Burma. Every chapter begins with a quote from 1984. Indeed, her experiences in Myanmar (Burma) are eerily reminiscent of that dystopia. Everywhere people are scared to speak openly in public, and everywhere people desperate to share their truth. I read Burmese Days a couple months back, and it was useful It is ominous to think of Orwell's unintentional trilogy about Burma: Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984. This concept lies at the heart of Emma Larkin's (a pseudonym) Finding George Orwell in Burma. Every chapter begins with a quote from 1984. Indeed, her experiences in Myanmar (Burma) are eerily reminiscent of that dystopia. Everywhere people are scared to speak openly in public, and everywhere people desperate to share their truth. I read Burmese Days a couple months back, and it was useful to have that book fresh in my head while reading this.
Katie
You should read (or re-read) Orwell before reading this book. I made the mistake of not doing that, so it held a little less relevance for me, but was still really intriguing as a travelogue to a country I was just about to visit. I'd recommend for anyone traveling to Burma or anyone interested in what the country was recently like (and what it still is like, to some extent). The author visits several places that are a bit off the beaten tourist path, however, so I wouldn't expect to wind up by You should read (or re-read) Orwell before reading this book. I made the mistake of not doing that, so it held a little less relevance for me, but was still really intriguing as a travelogue to a country I was just about to visit. I'd recommend for anyone traveling to Burma or anyone interested in what the country was recently like (and what it still is like, to some extent). The author visits several places that are a bit off the beaten tourist path, however, so I wouldn't expect to wind up by chance in any of the places she visited.
Talinehay
This book is so well written and such an eye opener. I feel I now know George Orwell, him as a person as well as his life, a little better. I also feel like I learnt more about the political and human rights situation of Burma/Myanmar, and it has increased my need to keep on track on the political situation in the country as I have some connections there and my thoughts are always with them. The book was given to me by an acquaintance, I don't think I would have bought it without knowing about i This book is so well written and such an eye opener. I feel I now know George Orwell, him as a person as well as his life, a little better. I also feel like I learnt more about the political and human rights situation of Burma/Myanmar, and it has increased my need to keep on track on the political situation in the country as I have some connections there and my thoughts are always with them. The book was given to me by an acquaintance, I don't think I would have bought it without knowing about it.
Millie Parekh
FANTASTIC.

So this was a super quick read for me for two reasons. One, because I knew nothing about Burma/Myanmar before reading this book. And two it sheds soo much light on Orwell's writings. This is probably my ignorance speaking, but I was unaware of his deep ties to Burma and how the injustices he saw there vividly appear in his writings.

This book also made me realize how often I take for granted the freedoms we have. It's startling that in today's day and age there are still entire countrie FANTASTIC.

So this was a super quick read for me for two reasons. One, because I knew nothing about Burma/Myanmar before reading this book. And two it sheds soo much light on Orwell's writings. This is probably my ignorance speaking, but I was unaware of his deep ties to Burma and how the injustices he saw there vividly appear in his writings.

This book also made me realize how often I take for granted the freedoms we have. It's startling that in today's day and age there are still entire countries that are under supression and censorship to this extent.

Michelle
Lovely book of the experiences of the author (Emma Larkin is not her real name) who traveled around Burma, interviewing Burmese and reflecting on George Orwell's experiences in Burma, and how even Animal Farm and 1984 can be seen as commenting on Burma today. Ms. Larkin also wrote an excellent book detailing the tragedy of Cyclone Nargis, its effect upon Burma, and the Burmese government's response, or better, lack of response, to it.
Debbie
Found this a fun and lively read from both the travel book perspective and the literary tract. I read a lot of Asia books and this was a good modern one on Burma. There are not a lot out there thanks to those small minded generals and colonels that call themselves the government in Myanmar. I had read all the Orwell books which she references and it was nice to be reminded of them as she was in the various locations in Burma where he once was.
Kathleen McRae
This was an extremely well written book and a good book to read if you wish to find out about the political climate and history of Myanmar without reading a scholarly tome. Finding George Orwell in Burma is a literary tome as it follows George Orwell's time in Burma as a policeman while the author visits in present day Myanmar. The Generals who control Myanmar have made it into what is probably the worst 'Big Brother' country in the world
Pamela Day
Very interesting introduction to Myanmar. And a perfect follow after Orwell's Burmese Days. I think Larkin's theory that Orwell's novels are actually a trilogy of the Burmese Government is spot on.

If you are traveling to Myanmar - or are just curious as to what life is like in a paranoid Military State - I recommend it.

Besides the subject matter and point of view - Larkin is a pleasure to read
Susan
Definitely recommend the book. The author visits the places that Orwell lived when in Burma. She describes contemporary life in the country today, Orwell's life when in Burma and later, commentary on contemporary dictatorship via Burmese Days, Animal Farm, and 1984. Definitely an unusual and very interesting book. I listened to Burmese Days while I was in India back in January. This book was a welcome find.
Erin
Extraordinary blend of travel memoir, exploration of George Orwell's life and work, and Burmese history. The author was fearless in her efforts to get below the superficial serenity of Burmese society and learn the truth about the relentless regime and its effect on citizen's lives. It has been ten years since Larkin's book first came out and it appears that a great deal has changed. Here's hoping her next book on Burma is a happier one.
Ruth
Travel writing meets conspiracy theories meets real-live dystopia meets history meets literary criticism meets AWESOME. I very much enjoyed this journalistic nonfiction foray into the country that shaped Eric Blair (George Orwell) into the type of man who would present the world with such bleak offerings as Animal Farm and 1984.

Given what's been going on in Burma (Myanmar) the past few weeks, I found the author's conclusion to be especially compelling.
Sagar
Somewhere between a travelogue, a biography of George Orwell and a country profile of Burma. A brilliant read that will transport you between two very distant times (Orwells and early 2000's Burma) tying together the threads that make (and have unmade) this fascinating country. Slightly dated given the regimes increasingly loosened grip and the opening of the country to the outside world. But it provides ample food for thought on what the people you meet (if you travel there) have endured.
Josh
Sometimes it's hard to pull off this kind of literary travel book. But she does it with aplomb. She skillfully interweaves the totalitarian reality of modern day Burma with Orwell's time there in the British empire but most impressively with Animal House and 1984. The joke is that Orwell wrote 3 books about Burma, Burmese Days, and then 1984 and Animal Farm... (without knowing the second 2 would so resemble Burma.
Jennifer
Easily the best book I've read this year, Finding George Orwell in Burma is both travelogue and literary detective story. Larkin traces Eric Blair's life whilst posted with the Imperial Police Force and the parallels between his writings and the politics of Myanmar, which in ways are so prescient as to earn him the title of "Prophet" in that country. Fascinating, informative, and an absolute joy to read.
Keith
I'd often joke about how true 1984 is today. Unfortunately, this book shows very strong and true parallels between Burma / Myanmar and Orwell's famous book. She went to Burma looking for his history and found herself in his books.

Though not long, the book still finds a way to drag on. I can't really blame the author though. I think it has more to do how widespread the oppressiveness is. So with each new town the author visits, it's just more of the same.
George
To be fair, I did not finish this book, so it might get really awesome after page 78. Since it was not assigned and since I was sitting on a beach, I let it slide. The author's thesis that all three of Orwell's major books (Burnese Days, Animal Farm and 1984) can be read as a tale of modern Burma is unlikely true, but the stories she tells to support this just didn't capture my attention. More committed readers may disagree.
Steve
a deceptively simple book that provides a profound series of insights into the brutalities of the Burmese regime by not focusing on a political analysis or critique, but instead gives voice and face to 'average' Burmese people. When linked to the journals and contradictions of Orwell as a colonial officer, the book manages to convey the particulars of Orwell's experiences with the heavier hand of colonial rule.
Jennifer
Haunting book and deeply brave work. She makes the lives of people in this country real for the reader who cannot visit and only has a limited access to information. I cared about some of the people in this book and still wonder how they are doing. Part history, travelogue and reporting. Burma is fascinating country for its deep relationships with other countries like India, England and now China. Especially interesting stories of expats who chose to stay.
Sara
This was an interesting book...I found the descriptions of Burma both fascinating and sad, as I hadn't known too much about this part of the world before reading this book. The parallels to 1984 were sometimes illuminating, but overall the links to Orwell felt pretty strained at times, and I often found myself skimming these sections. I think I would have preferred more of a straightforward book about Burma and less of the literary criticism/Orwell detectiving.
crm
This was good, but not great. I would have like to know more about Orwell. Larkin uses Orwell's life and experiences in Burma as a jumping off point and traces his geographical locations in the country as well as his perceived influence and impact in present-day Burma. For me, it could have been a longer and deeper investigation, but has influenced me to think about travelling to Burma, which I have long held off because of its military regime.
Melissa
I was interested in this book from a literary standpoint - I thought it might give insight into George Orwell's writings. What I ended up with was some fascinating info about Myanmar, about which I knew very little.

The book is a mix of travel account, biography of George Orwell, and essays on the political situation of Myanmar. The book is an smooth read - not dense at all. I would recommend to to students (late high-school) who need a realistic picture of a totalitarian government.
Skylinebal
A book made more urgent by the cyclones, though it was published before. A journalist spends a year in Burma visiting the places George Orwell worked as a British Imperial police before beginning his career as a writer. She colors his most famous works as prophetic to the nation Myanmar has become. It's a decent thesis, and I found myself envying Larkin's assignment.
Aileen
I had an embarassingly scant knowledge of Burma before reading this book and now I want to go (though my conscience won't allow me). I was especially intrigued that Burma has such a high literacy rate...This book was also a nice "time travel experiment" through the George Orwell books I had read many years before.
Holly Burns
This was a quick read but a fairly easy one. I particularly enjoyed it because I could picture a lot of what the author was writing about, having traveled through Burma in 2006. I probably would have enjoyed it even MORE if I'd actually ever read any Orwell, of course, but now I'm inspired to do so. So, yeah, there's that.
!!!angryradish!!!!
I usually despise non-fiction, but this book was tops. It's a short read and is so riveting. It's great because you learn about life in Burma, but it also has the interesting angle of drawing parallels to 1984, a book clearly banned in Burma but which some of the people in the book have read. So good. Excellent choice if you're lookin' for a quickie.
Linda Slonksnes
I learned so much reading just the title and the first 20 or so pages. Great information. Easy to read. It would have been better if it had some breaks between thoughts. Places, history, current events tent to run together, making a few things confusing. Even so, it is still easy to read, informative, and fascinating.
And Rea
I love George Orwell novels and feel sometimes overly aware of how Orwellian modern life can be. This book ties Orwell's writing to possible sources of his ideas of big government from his stay in Burma (Myanmar. It is an interesting read mixing non fiction past and present with beautiful ficticious stories.
Arielle Rittvo
This is the best book I have ever read about a country while traveling in it. Emma Larkin did a great job of telling the story of the Myanmar you don't see while weaving excerpts from 1984, Animal Farm, and Burmese Days through out the book. While reading, I couldn't put the book down for the first half. The second half was good, but I thought the first 200 pages were magnificent.
Ming
A revealing book, hinged on retracing Orwell's early adulthood years in Burma. This platform leads the reader to discover and learn about how British colonialism directly contributed to Burma's current tyranny over its people. The story is also uplifting as Larkin showcases the resilience and humor of the people she meets.
Sarah
Another one on my top ten list...I found this book, or should I say, this book found me, just months before the tragedies in Myanmar. I just couldn't believe the atrocities that were and are currently going on over there. Larkin (a pseudonym) writes like a true journalist. It's a compelling, fast paced, and eye-opening piece of work.
Elizabeth
As a great (great) admirer of Orwell, I loved this book exploring his time as a colonial civil servant in Burma. Larkin uses '1984,' 'Animal Farm' and 'Burmese Days' to explain contemporary Burma, and uses Orwell's experience in Burma to explain the author's early encounters and disgust with colonialism and totalitarianism. A fantastic, informative, well-written and timely read.
Kam
More of a well-researched history than a flowing travel diary, this book is an excellent primer on the history of Burma from colonization of the British through about the year 2000. The reliance on Orwell is ever-present; sometimes relying too much on his writing instead of original prose. Still, a great read for anyone interested in the topic.
hannah
This book discussed the conflict in Burma as seen through the eyes of a woman who is researching George Orwell's historical links to the country. It is interesting to learn more about Burma's history, especially given the current conflict but it is also a quick read- even for those who are not particularly interested in Orwell.
Susan
The author followed the five years of George Orwell's life in Burma. She travelled to each important posting and visited with natives on the way, if you can really visit with anyone in a police state. The ties between Burma and Orwell's three novels is amazing. This book really illustrates how Myanmar, the new Burma, closely mirrors Orwell's novels written so many years ago.
Diane Kerner
maybe i wasn't in the mood for this. i love first-hand accounts about other cultures, not particularly interested in George Orwell and this book really is about visiting Burma in the context of where he once lived. i'd just read a page-turner by Dean Koontz (not my usual genre) and perhaps this just moved too slow to follow.
Marcel Lewicki
Perfect companion to Orwell's 'Burmese Days' on any journey to Myanmar. Part travelogue, part biography of Orwell's time in then-Burma, it's a good introduction to the country and its political problems. Things have changed somewhat since the book came out, though, and you might not find the atmosphere nowadays to be what it was ten years ago.
Susanna
Fascinating look at relatively current conditions in Myanmar/Burma. George Orwell's mother lived in Burma - and he was posted there as a type of police office. The author - who uses a pseudonym because journalists are not tolerated in Myanmar - traces George Orwells life in Burma - which she uses as a vehicle to discuss the current regime.
Rachel G.
I was surprised by how much I loved this book. I'm an Orwell fan, and a fan of dystopian future books, and as it turns out, Burma is something out of an Orwellian nightmare. (Or, was, since this book is now outdated). A really, really fascinating look at Burma - I'd be interested to read Larkin's most recent book.
Tanya
Loved every page of this book. Thought it was fascinating. I learned so much about the culture, history, and politics of Burma. It was a surprisingly easy read - not at all heady. Apparently the books has 2 or 3 versions as the author updates the epilogue as the political situation in Burma changes, so try to get the most current print.
Anastasia
Yikes. I admit I've been less than well-informed on the situation in Burma, but I was amazed by this journalist's conversations with people living under such a shadow still taking in literature--valuing it perhaps much more than we tend to in the US these days. It works as a travelogue but more interestingly as an exposure of the lives of readers in a nation where every word is censored.
Bethany Woodson
I loved this book! Full of so much good info. I wish there would have been a spoiler alert because the author did go into detail on some George Orwell novels that I hadn't read. She specifically discusses 1984, Animal Farm, and Burmese Days so if you haven't read these any want to, I highly suggest you do so before reading this. Regardless though I loved this and highly recommend it.
Holly Quin
one of the best travel books i've ever read. a fascinating look behind the scenes of the political turmoil in burma. People ambivalent to Orwell will not be disappointed, this book is about much much more than him. I read this while I was in Burma and it changed my perspective completely. I recommend this book to everyone. JUST READ IT
Leave Feeback for Finding George Orwell in Burma
Useful Links