Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow

Written by: Faïza Guène, Sarah Adams

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow Book Cover
He thought I'd forged my mom's name on the slip. How stupid is that? On this thing Mom just made a kind of squiggly shape on the page. That jerk didn't even think about what he was saying, didn't even ask himself why her signature might be weird. He's one of those people who think illiteracy is like AIDS. It only exists in Africa.
--from Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow


 "A tale for anyone who has ever lived outside looking in, especially from that alien country called adolescence. A funny, heartfelt story from a wise guy who happens to be a girl. If you've ever fallen in love, if you've ever had your heart broken, this story is your story." -- Sandra Cisneros, author of THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET 

The Paradise projects are only a few metro stops from Paris, but here it's a whole different kind of France. Doria's father, the Beard, has headed back to their hometown in Morocco, leaving her and her mom to cope with their mektoub—their destiny—alone. They have a little help-- from a social worker sent by the city, a psychiatrist sent by the school, and a thug friend who recites Rimbaud.

It seems like fate’s dealt them an impossible hand, but Doria might still make a new life. She'll prove the projects aren't only about rap, soccer, and religious tension. She’ll take the Arabic word kif-kif (same old, same old) and mix it up with the French verb kiffer (to really like something). Now she has a whole new motto: KIFFE KIFFE TOMORROW.

"Moving and irreverent, sad and funny, full of rage and intelligence. [Guène's] characters are unforgettable, her voice fresh, and her book a delight." -- Laila Lalami, author of Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits

Faïza Guène, the child of Algerian immigrants, grew up in the public housing projects of Pantin, outside Paris. This is her first book.
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 70
9
23
25
10
3
Looking for Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow Reviews

Maura
1.5 étoiles.

Je n'ai pas aimé le livre. Désolée. Mais Doria était très ennuyeuse et il n'y avait pas une "vrai histoire". Il était les petites histoires des gens dans sa vie.

C'est une possibilité que je n'aime pas le livre parce que français est ma deuxième langue, donc je comprends pas tout, mais je sais pas. Pour le plus part j'ai compris bien et juste quand elle a parlé des choses au hasard comme les films américains et les auteurs français que je n'ai pas pu comprendre qu’elle a voulu dire.

C 1.5 étoiles.

Je n'ai pas aimé le livre. Désolée. Mais Doria était très ennuyeuse et il n'y avait pas une "vrai histoire". Il était les petites histoires des gens dans sa vie.

C'est une possibilité que je n'aime pas le livre parce que français est ma deuxième langue, donc je comprends pas tout, mais je sais pas. Pour le plus part j'ai compris bien et juste quand elle a parlé des choses au hasard comme les films américains et les auteurs français que je n'ai pas pu comprendre qu’elle a voulu dire.

C'était juste d'accord. N'était pas un livre que je donnerais à un ami.

Je sais pas que je veux dire.

Désolée a mes amis qui parlent anglais, tout de mes autres rédactions sont en anglais.
Yukiguni
Tagebuchartig gestalteter Roman einer jungen Marokkanerin, die in der pariser Banlieu aufwächst. Stilistisch ist das schnoddrige Alltagssprache in französisch-arabisch/maghrebinischem Dialekt, was die Lektüre nicht gerade einfach, aber eben enorm interessant gemacht hat. Mein Arsenal an Schimpfworten ist nun gut gefüllt.

Das Buch erzählt keine zusammenhängende Geschichte, sondern vermittelt einzelne Szenen und Ausrisse aus dem Alltagsleben der Anti-Heldin. Allerdings fügen sich die Miniaturen im Tagebuchartig gestalteter Roman einer jungen Marokkanerin, die in der pariser Banlieu aufwächst. Stilistisch ist das schnoddrige Alltagssprache in französisch-arabisch/maghrebinischem Dialekt, was die Lektüre nicht gerade einfach, aber eben enorm interessant gemacht hat. Mein Arsenal an Schimpfworten ist nun gut gefüllt.

Das Buch erzählt keine zusammenhängende Geschichte, sondern vermittelt einzelne Szenen und Ausrisse aus dem Alltagsleben der Anti-Heldin. Allerdings fügen sich die Miniaturen im Verlauf der Erzählung zu einem immer geschlosseneren und schlüssigen Gesamtbild zusammen, das einen großartigen Einblick in diese - mir doch recht fremde - Welt bietet.

Ein toller Roman, den man vorbehaltlos empfehlen kann. Unbedingt lesenswert.
Riikka
The book reads almost like the protagonist's journal. Doria doesn't let anyone get close, least of all the reader and concentrates mainly on describing the world around her. There isn't much joy in the life in the suburbs, especially when you're poor. However, even when things look bad, there's still some hope on the horizon.

I really liked this book and I'm glad I managed to find it in my local library. The main character's voice sounded genuine and even though her tone was very wry it was also The book reads almost like the protagonist's journal. Doria doesn't let anyone get close, least of all the reader and concentrates mainly on describing the world around her. There isn't much joy in the life in the suburbs, especially when you're poor. However, even when things look bad, there's still some hope on the horizon.

I really liked this book and I'm glad I managed to find it in my local library. The main character's voice sounded genuine and even though her tone was very wry it was also humorous and at times refreshingly self-critical. I'd love to read other books by the author!
A Woman of Substance :: Baby Island :: The Hidden Persuaders :: Five Little Peppers Abroad :: Inés of My Soul
Louise Bray
Kiffe kiffe demain n'a pas d'intrigue, il s'agit de la vie quotidienne d'une jeune fille marocaine dans la banlieue. Normalement je n'aime pas les livres sans intrigue, mais en fait j'ai bien apprécié celui-ci. C'était intéressant de voir le cycle apparemment sans fin des banlieusards et des musulmanes en France, surtout aujourd'hui quand il existe tant de racisme après les attentats terroristes. Ce n'était pas absolument incroyable, mais c'était intéressant et facile à lire.
Rifat Islam
Riveting account of a first-generation French girl living in the isolated "banlieues." Also an interesting look into Maghrebi/North African culture in France today, and the complications of economic inequality in French society.
Priscila Carvalho
I loved this book, i totally relate with the character. It was really great to see her inner growth and the change in her point of view about the future. The writer is extraordinary, she can talk about deep subjects but in a way that is easy to comprehend.
Melody
If students want to read about what life is like for an immigrant in the housing projects of Paris, this has some good insights. Not your typical "fun school trip to Paris" YA novel.
Melissa Cottrell
This was a really quick read, and gave me a very different perspective on life to my own. I read this in preparation for studying it at college.
Katriel
Not much happened but it was kinda funny
Emma
I hated this book--there is no plot, a confusing protagonist, and a bunch of other junk that make it one of the worst books I've ever read! Definitely not a good choice for young adults.
Rachel Sherrill
Great fiction insight into the lives of the poor communities of France told from the relatable point of view of an adolescent girl.
Eleow
Un livre chouette, avec une personnage principale drôle et sympathique. Ca se lit vite !
Elizabeth
While perhaps this may be best suited for young adults (or adults fresh out of adolescence), those still tuned to the teenager mind, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is a quick and fresh take on the coming-of-age genre.

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow tells the story of Doria, a cynical 15-year old daughter of Moroccan immigrants growing up in France. Doria begins the book in a bad place - her father has just left her family, she has only one friend (a 28 year old drug dealer who quotes her poetry), her mother has a te While perhaps this may be best suited for young adults (or adults fresh out of adolescence), those still tuned to the teenager mind, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is a quick and fresh take on the coming-of-age genre.

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow tells the story of Doria, a cynical 15-year old daughter of Moroccan immigrants growing up in France. Doria begins the book in a bad place - her father has just left her family, she has only one friend (a 28 year old drug dealer who quotes her poetry), her mother has a terrible job, and she's struggling in school. Her voice is bitter and dry, and Faïza Guène's writing style flows brilliantly in this tone. Guène doesn't strainto make Doria sound like a realistic teenager - everything about Doria's observations and frustration sounds firsthand and barely filtered adaptations of the then 19 year old Guène's own experiences growing up.

Guène has a way with words that makes Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow both a pleasurable and enlightening read. It's brisk and to the point, however skimping somewhat on character development (though never for a moment on world-building, which is excellently done). Like many coming-of-age novels, it also lacks some kind of coherent plot, regaling instead Doria's scattered observations and feelings over the course of one year. Still, at the end, Guène ties together all threads in what can only be called one of the most gradual and subtly developed optimistic endings I have ever encountered.

Well-written (in its own, casual way), well translated, and quite thought-provoking, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is a nice - if somewhat underdeveloped - addition to the coming-of-age canon. Recommended to older teenage readers in particular who are looking for a chance to acquaint themselves with a different world than that typically found in English-language literature, as well as all readers looking for a short, quality coming-of-age novel. Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is certainly a worthy, thoughtful choice.
Tim
Doria is 15 years old, Moroccan-French, and lives just outside of Paris--but her account of life in the Parisian projects could just as easily take place in any impoverished, marginalized community in Europe (or the U.S.).

She might not have been angry when she moved into the projects, but life there--abandoned by her dad, taught by uninspired teachers, monitored by nosy and condescending social workers, humiliated by others for her poverty and ethnicity--is enough to make anyone angry. (Or resi Doria is 15 years old, Moroccan-French, and lives just outside of Paris--but her account of life in the Parisian projects could just as easily take place in any impoverished, marginalized community in Europe (or the U.S.).

She might not have been angry when she moved into the projects, but life there--abandoned by her dad, taught by uninspired teachers, monitored by nosy and condescending social workers, humiliated by others for her poverty and ethnicity--is enough to make anyone angry. (Or resigned: a google-search there are 17 repetitions of someone or other "not giving a shit" about something or other.)

We follow Doria through the ebb and flow of her year. Being endlessly quizzed by a pack of social workers and psychologists--some well-meaning, some apathetic. Failing out of the main-track school, and being re-assigned to a hairdressing "trade" school. Her mother weeping over a no-respect job at a local hotel, while mourning her husband's abandonment. Meeting a boy who tutors her, but then steals a kiss, and backs away from Doria. Shooting the breeze with her older, poetry-loving, hashish-addled neighbor, Hamoudi--until he meets a lover.

Eventually, though, Doria (and her mother's) fortunes change. The social workers say she's "graduated" from a need for counseling. Hairdressing school turns out to be okay. Her mother enters literacy and job-training classes, and no longer feels isolated. The tutoring-boy apologizes for withdrawing from Doria, and they reconcile. Hamoudi's new relationship spurs him to clean up his act. The resolution of the novella seems reasonable ("eventually the wheel turns for everyone," Doria observes), albeit a bit contrived. Then again, it's less depressing to read about people who muddle through their challenges, rather than be overwhelmed by them.

A gripping and worthwhile read.
Sara
I picked up this book by chance after finding it on the shelf at the library, and it was an extremely quick read. Doria's a teenager in France, born to Moroccan immigrant parents. Her dad took off and returned to Morocco to marry a younger woman who could produce a son, so now Doria's left with her mom in their crummy apartment, talks to only the other immigrants in her complex and the social worker who visits them, and sort of goes through life filled with anger and apathy for her lot and her s I picked up this book by chance after finding it on the shelf at the library, and it was an extremely quick read. Doria's a teenager in France, born to Moroccan immigrant parents. Her dad took off and returned to Morocco to marry a younger woman who could produce a son, so now Doria's left with her mom in their crummy apartment, talks to only the other immigrants in her complex and the social worker who visits them, and sort of goes through life filled with anger and apathy for her lot and her situation.

The book is written in a very train-of-thought manner. There's no real plot except to be a coming-of-age story told from a different perspective than usual, that of a young immigrant outside of Paris. This made the book different from anything else I've read and shed light on the mindset of these sort of immigrants who don't really fit in and somehow fall through the cracks of French society despite the government's efforts to care for and integrate them. Doria's anger felt authentic, and I could see why she was disillusioned with her life, but at the same time, she didn't take a whole lot of action to change anything and simply let things happen while she complained about how bad she had it.

I did enjoy Doria's voice overall and her casual perspective on the problems faced by seemingly everyone in her apartment complex. However, I wish there had been more to this novel instead of having it just coast through various scenes held together by nothing more than the fact that they were fragments of Doria's life. I think I enjoyed the book more in retrospect, as I can now reflect on the theme of the entire book, but there really wasn't a lot to it, resulting in a novel that felt very thin overall without any truly significant events.
Lars Poulsen
Forfatteren, Faïza Guène, er anden-generations indvandrer fra Algier. “Kiffe kiffe i morgen” er hendes debutroman, skrevet da hun var 19 år. Bogen er udgivet i 26 lande, og har vundet flere priser.

Doria er en 15-årig anden-generations indvandrer. Bogen er skrevet i dagbogsform, og vi følger Doria på godt og ondt i et års tid. Den handler om almindelige teenage-ting, og om at vokse op i en parisisk forstadsghetto blandt indvandrere, narkohandel og kriminalitet. Den handler også om at være splitte Forfatteren, Faïza Guène, er anden-generations indvandrer fra Algier. “Kiffe kiffe i morgen” er hendes debutroman, skrevet da hun var 19 år. Bogen er udgivet i 26 lande, og har vundet flere priser.

Doria er en 15-årig anden-generations indvandrer. Bogen er skrevet i dagbogsform, og vi følger Doria på godt og ondt i et års tid. Den handler om almindelige teenage-ting, og om at vokse op i en parisisk forstadsghetto blandt indvandrere, narkohandel og kriminalitet. Den handler også om at være splittet mellem to kulturer, og konstant overvåget af de sociale myndigheder.

Doria skulle have været en dreng, men til hendes fars store skuffelse, fik han en datter – og kun den ene. Da vi kommer ind i historien, er han flyttet tilbage til Algier, og har giftet sig med en yngre kvinde, der kan give ham den dreng han mangler. I Frankrig lever Doria alene med sin mor, der aldrig har skullet klare sig selv før. Doria går til psykolog, bliver smidt ud af skolen og optaget på frisørskolen. Det har hun ganske vist aldrig ønsket, eller bedt om, men det er der der er plads, så systemet tilmelder hende.

“Kiffe kiffe i morgen”, er skrevet i teenageres talesprog, i meget korte kapitler, og det fungerer rigtig godt – i hvert fald til en vis grad, for desværre formår Francois-Eric Grodin, der har oversat bogen fra fransk, ikke at få dette sprog til at flyde rigtigt. Der benyttes vendinger der ikke findes på dansk, og flere af de benyttede slangudtryk er konsekvent stavet forkert. I det hele taget giver bogen det indtryk, at korrekturen er blevet sparet væk. Faïza Guènes lille roman, er til fire stjerner, men på grund af forlagets tilsyneladende lemfældige omgang med originalen, lander helhedsoplevelsen på en 3’er.
Nancy
Kiffe Kiffe Demain,or Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow if you want it translated, bases its title on a play on words. Kif-Kif from the Arabic, meaning all the same or "same old, same old" and the informal French verb kiffer meaning to like a lot. Well, actually there's more to it than that, but this review isn't about word meanings and origins. It is about the world that Guéne lets us see, the Paris that is not in any guidebook, and the multidimensional lives of the residents of these overlooked housing pro Kiffe Kiffe Demain,or Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow if you want it translated, bases its title on a play on words. Kif-Kif from the Arabic, meaning all the same or "same old, same old" and the informal French verb kiffer meaning to like a lot. Well, actually there's more to it than that, but this review isn't about word meanings and origins. It is about the world that Guéne lets us see, the Paris that is not in any guidebook, and the multidimensional lives of the residents of these overlooked housing projects, so close and yet so far from the chic City of Lights. Doria is a smart, blunt, cynical heroine. And why shouldn't she be? She and her mother were abandoned by Doria's father, when he returned to Morocco to try for a boy with his second wife. Doria, being a girl, was a complete disappointment to him. Doria's mom struggles to make ends meet, the young people in the projects scrabble to make a life between two very different cultures, go to jail too often, and find "la vie en rose" is not in their future. Indeed, there doesn't seem to be much to be optimistic about. But little by little, Doria can see that life can turn, if ever so slowly, and maybe, just maybe, there is reason to hope.
The author was 19 when she wrote this book, and has gone on to write a couple more. She has a wise, and original voice. Well worth the read.
Maria
I liked the idea of this book more than I actually liked the book. I wonder, though, if it was the translation that was the problem rather than the story itself.

The book I read was translated in the UK from the French, and then edited for the US. To me, the slang was all over the place and distracting. One character said, "Uh, how y'don?" I felt like I was reading a book that took place in New Jersey, not France. Other phrases were very British. But then there were also references to French pop I liked the idea of this book more than I actually liked the book. I wonder, though, if it was the translation that was the problem rather than the story itself.

The book I read was translated in the UK from the French, and then edited for the US. To me, the slang was all over the place and distracting. One character said, "Uh, how y'don?" I felt like I was reading a book that took place in New Jersey, not France. Other phrases were very British. But then there were also references to French popular culture (actors, TV programs, etc.) that I didn't understand.

I wondered if references to American pop culture were added for the translation or were in the original book. There was a comment about how in "Little House on the Prairie" there would be a big drama, everyone would make the sign of the cross and have a cry about it, then forget about it by the next episode. I knew what was meant, but the Ingalls family was Protestant and would never have made the sign of the cross.

Maybe a better translation and a better editor would have made it a better book.
Aichoo
Doria, une fille de quinze ans, vit seule avec sa mère dans un appartement de la banlieue parisienne (cité de Livry-Gargan), Elle retrace les petits et grands événements de sa vie, au lycée, dans la cité, ou à l'appartement .. Elle nous présente sa mère, femme de ménage, Son pote Hamoudi, Et puis aussi, la psy, les profs. Elle nous décrit aussi l'absence de son père, parti refaire sa vie au Maroc.

Ce n'est pas tout à fait littéraire, mais c'est très bien écrit, avec beaucoup d'humour et d'à-prop Doria, une fille de quinze ans, vit seule avec sa mère dans un appartement de la banlieue parisienne (cité de Livry-Gargan), Elle retrace les petits et grands événements de sa vie, au lycée, dans la cité, ou à l'appartement .. Elle nous présente sa mère, femme de ménage, Son pote Hamoudi, Et puis aussi, la psy, les profs. Elle nous décrit aussi l'absence de son père, parti refaire sa vie au Maroc.

Ce n'est pas tout à fait littéraire, mais c'est très bien écrit, avec beaucoup d'humour et d'à-propos. Le roman se lit très facilement. En effet, L'écriture est bien maitrisée, La construction est parfaite. Le récit se relance régulièrement avec l'arrivée de nouveaux, l’écrivaine a cette capacité incroyable de traduire avec des mots simples des sentiments complexes.

Kiffe kiffe demain est une voix, celle d'une enfant des quartiers. Un roman plein de sève, d'humour et de vie.

C’est un livre que je recommande aux parents qui souhaitent réconcilier leurs fils (et filles :p )avec la lecture, avant de lire la grande littérature .. Surement je vais le recommander à ma petite sœur ;)
Mary
This short young adult novel was authored by Faïza Guène, a young French Algerian woman who grew up in one of the notorious housing projects in the suburbs of Paris, populated by young Arabs who are caught between two disparate cultures. The novel is narrated first person by Doria, a 15-year old teen whose father has abandoned her and her mother and gone back to his Moroccan village to marry a young new wife, one who can provide him with a son. Doria's voice is fresh, slangy, full of pop culture This short young adult novel was authored by Faïza Guène, a young French Algerian woman who grew up in one of the notorious housing projects in the suburbs of Paris, populated by young Arabs who are caught between two disparate cultures. The novel is narrated first person by Doria, a 15-year old teen whose father has abandoned her and her mother and gone back to his Moroccan village to marry a young new wife, one who can provide him with a son. Doria's voice is fresh, slangy, full of pop culture references and very bitter. You get schooled in the life of the Arab ghettos of Paris, and the difficulties faced by young people who aren't fully French but aren't North African either. Assimilation is very difficult with the economic and cultural constraints they face. Ultimately though the story is positive, since Doria and her mother slowly rebuild and improve their lives after the father's abandonment. Good riddance to the patriarchy!

Julie
It's interesting to see common concerns of teenagers alongside the very specific concerns of the narrator who lives in the projects outside of Paris. It's a reminder that no matter where we live, what culture we belong to, we share common bonds relating to emotions, desires, and dreams. I'm partial to this book because the author was herself a teenager at the time she wrote it, and I enjoy hearing about life directly from the source. Having been to Paris, I was interested to read about parts of It's interesting to see common concerns of teenagers alongside the very specific concerns of the narrator who lives in the projects outside of Paris. It's a reminder that no matter where we live, what culture we belong to, we share common bonds relating to emotions, desires, and dreams. I'm partial to this book because the author was herself a teenager at the time she wrote it, and I enjoy hearing about life directly from the source. Having been to Paris, I was interested to read about parts of Paris you don't experience or see (except from the train) as a tourist. She gives voice to a world many Americans only know from news headlines about riots in Paris (or don't know about at all). We now have a rich genre of immigrant literature in young adult novels set in America, but this book expands the genre to immigrants in other nations as well.
Asha
My aunt recommended this book to me, so I really felt that I HAD to enjoy it. But I just couldn't finish it. The main issue was that there was no true storyline. I got about three quarters of the way through the book and it still felt like I was reading exposition. Though the author was trying to put a fresh spin on a teenage POV, but all I heard was 'this happened, then that happened...' etc. Everything was told, not shown. There are some books that can pull off not having figurative language o My aunt recommended this book to me, so I really felt that I HAD to enjoy it. But I just couldn't finish it. The main issue was that there was no true storyline. I got about three quarters of the way through the book and it still felt like I was reading exposition. Though the author was trying to put a fresh spin on a teenage POV, but all I heard was 'this happened, then that happened...' etc. Everything was told, not shown. There are some books that can pull off not having figurative language or imagery, but this IS NOT one of them. The characters, even the protagonist, were flat and boring. I understand that the book portrays France's racial divides, and I can respect that. But from a purely literary point of view, this book left a lot to be desired.
Ellen A.
This book is a quick read with a strong and amusing female adolescent narrator. Doria and her mother live in the poorer section of Paris surviving on her mother's grueling hotel maid job and government assistance. Doria makes astute observations about the injustices around her, from the incarceration of her male friends to comments she overhears about her out-of-date second hand clothing. Not much happens, plot-wise, although Doria and her mother are better off at the end of the book than in the This book is a quick read with a strong and amusing female adolescent narrator. Doria and her mother live in the poorer section of Paris surviving on her mother's grueling hotel maid job and government assistance. Doria makes astute observations about the injustices around her, from the incarceration of her male friends to comments she overhears about her out-of-date second hand clothing. Not much happens, plot-wise, although Doria and her mother are better off at the end of the book than in the beginning, with Doria adopting a more confident and hopeful outlook. For someone who is not a native speaker of French, the plot points are easy to understand, but I had to look up a lot of the slang terms used.
L
I actually really enjoyed this book for the most part. I'm not the best judge of how well written something in French is, but this was very interesting and had its beautiful moments. However, the end just lost my interest. It felt like each of the last few chapters were selecting a character arc and wrapping it up neatly, just for the sake of having everything end, even though a lot of these endings didn't really make sense to me. (view spoiler)[Some examples would be Hamoudi's engagement to Lil I actually really enjoyed this book for the most part. I'm not the best judge of how well written something in French is, but this was very interesting and had its beautiful moments. However, the end just lost my interest. It felt like each of the last few chapters were selecting a character arc and wrapping it up neatly, just for the sake of having everything end, even though a lot of these endings didn't really make sense to me. (view spoiler)[Some examples would be Hamoudi's engagement to Lila and Doria being declared no longer in need of therapy by her psychologist. I didn't feel like either of these had the proper build up and both felt much more like showing than telling when it came to character development.(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]
Eleanor
I can't remember exactly when I read this book, but I did read it for book group at the Alliance Francaise. I'm only adding it because I'm reading her new book "Du reve pour les oufs" which the store.com and good reads can't seem to find anywhere. This book is funny. It's juvenile and ridiculous (good for learning French slang), but her social commentary is astute in a satirical kind of way. I still laugh to myself about "Madame DuBidule, Madame DuTruc." De reve pour les oufs seems to be continuing I can't remember exactly when I read this book, but I did read it for book group at the Alliance Francaise. I'm only adding it because I'm reading her new book "Du reve pour les oufs" which the store.com and good reads can't seem to find anywhere. This book is funny. It's juvenile and ridiculous (good for learning French slang), but her social commentary is astute in a satirical kind of way. I still laugh to myself about "Madame DuBidule, Madame DuTruc." De reve pour les oufs seems to be continuing in the same vein. I think these books, with their references to pop culture icons like Beyonce, will be obsolete in several years, but that's not really a concern to me right now.
Mrsgaskell
15-year old Doria’s father has returned to his native Morocco to wed a younger and hopefully more fertile wife in a bid to have a son. Doria and her mother Yasmina are left struggling in the suburban Paris project of Paradise. Yasmina is illiterate and works as a cleaner at the Formula 1 Motel; Doria is failing in scohool. Doria is seeing a psychiatrist Mme Burlaud, and the two are visited regularly by a succession of social workers. Doria is an engaging narrator, a justifiably angry adolescent 15-year old Doria’s father has returned to his native Morocco to wed a younger and hopefully more fertile wife in a bid to have a son. Doria and her mother Yasmina are left struggling in the suburban Paris project of Paradise. Yasmina is illiterate and works as a cleaner at the Formula 1 Motel; Doria is failing in scohool. Doria is seeing a psychiatrist Mme Burlaud, and the two are visited regularly by a succession of social workers. Doria is an engaging narrator, a justifiably angry adolescent who tells it like it is. At times funny, sad, wise, and angry this is an excellent novel about an outsider, one that is ultimately hopeful.
Dihya
J'ai trouvé le roman peu pertinent. Alors certes, la vie en banlieue est sans doute telle qu'elle est décrite à travers les yeux de la protagoniste, majoritairement. Mais c'est une description que tout le monde fait. ce n'est ni original ni avant-gardiste. Mais là encore,ce n'était probablement pas le but de l'auteur.
Kristina
This is a book that some of my students read for school. I often consider reading everything that they read so that when they come into my room talking about a book, I can discuss it with them. Overall, I think that this is a good book. There is a lot to consider - racism, poverty, French culture, education, adolescence. My only problem with the book was that Guene wrote the main character so well (in terms of being an angsty teenager) that I felt like I was at work when really I was on winter b This is a book that some of my students read for school. I often consider reading everything that they read so that when they come into my room talking about a book, I can discuss it with them. Overall, I think that this is a good book. There is a lot to consider - racism, poverty, French culture, education, adolescence. My only problem with the book was that Guene wrote the main character so well (in terms of being an angsty teenager) that I felt like I was at work when really I was on winter break. My guess is that kids will be able to connect and identify with her, but looking forward to hearing what they think about it...
tina
This book shed so much light into the life of young people in the French banlieues and just life in the banlieue in general. The struggle to survive, the "failed marriages", the drugs etc. It introduces you to a France that you did not think existed (at least I didn't). It gives a break from the dream of Paris, good life, wine, shopping and gives the perspectives of immigrant families and second generation immigrants and how they struggle to fit in a society that doesn't necessarily accept them. This book shed so much light into the life of young people in the French banlieues and just life in the banlieue in general. The struggle to survive, the "failed marriages", the drugs etc. It introduces you to a France that you did not think existed (at least I didn't). It gives a break from the dream of Paris, good life, wine, shopping and gives the perspectives of immigrant families and second generation immigrants and how they struggle to fit in a society that doesn't necessarily accept them.

The ending is rather rushed as Faïza tries to come to a conclusion and to resolve the conflicts in the book. She gives hope.
Mecque
I read this book in a day and really enjoyed it. The main character sounded like a real girl. It was bizarre for me to read because I have been to Paris but have never seen the projects. I was warned never to take the metro all the way outside of the city because it was dangerous. Doria in Kiffe Kiffe is under attack by weak paternal figures in an oppressive patriarchal society and by native French who represent wealth and democracy. Yet she remains a strong, independent voice throughout the nov I read this book in a day and really enjoyed it. The main character sounded like a real girl. It was bizarre for me to read because I have been to Paris but have never seen the projects. I was warned never to take the metro all the way outside of the city because it was dangerous. Doria in Kiffe Kiffe is under attack by weak paternal figures in an oppressive patriarchal society and by native French who represent wealth and democracy. Yet she remains a strong, independent voice throughout the novel. I liked how moral judgement is rarely passed on individual characters, and the women are not presented as submissive or as feminist goddesses. They live like real people.
Jane
loved reading it with Conor. He had interesting things to say about how the main character believes that falling in love is the way out of the hardships of her life. I realize how that is still often the female perspective. It felt confused to Conor, who, while sensitive, is far more practical than the heroine of Kiffe Kiffe. The book while perhaps not autobiographical, draws on the writer's experiences growing up in the projects outside Paris. We had a good discussion comparing this book to Cat loved reading it with Conor. He had interesting things to say about how the main character believes that falling in love is the way out of the hardships of her life. I realize how that is still often the female perspective. It felt confused to Conor, who, while sensitive, is far more practical than the heroine of Kiffe Kiffe. The book while perhaps not autobiographical, draws on the writer's experiences growing up in the projects outside Paris. We had a good discussion comparing this book to Catcher in the Rye, as well as the book's perspectives on marriage and heterosexual realtionships.
Lindsay
Okay, so I haven't read that many french books, but of the ones I have read (and not including Barbar :)) this is one of my favorites! It is written very informally and is like a journal of a young teenage girl living in the banlieues of Paris. It is semi-autobiographical since the author herself is quite young (she was 19 when she wrote the book) and she grew up in the HLMs in a banlieu of Paris. Uses lots of slang which was difficult to understand sometimes but otherwise it was not that bad to Okay, so I haven't read that many french books, but of the ones I have read (and not including Barbar :)) this is one of my favorites! It is written very informally and is like a journal of a young teenage girl living in the banlieues of Paris. It is semi-autobiographical since the author herself is quite young (she was 19 when she wrote the book) and she grew up in the HLMs in a banlieu of Paris. Uses lots of slang which was difficult to understand sometimes but otherwise it was not that bad to comprehend. A very real look into the life a young teenager and the situation in the banlieues.
Greg Lehman
Guène's Doria provides the kind of narrative I couldn't look away from once it started. Her pessimism isn't the usual kind that turns me off for its perpetual victimhood and "woe-is-me"-ing. Instead, the situations and burdens Doria inherits result in invention and curses, spiraling into creative territory that one would think reflect Guène's own predilection for making up stories that she has spoken about it in interviews. Being transported to new locations and story-telling techniques are the Guène's Doria provides the kind of narrative I couldn't look away from once it started. Her pessimism isn't the usual kind that turns me off for its perpetual victimhood and "woe-is-me"-ing. Instead, the situations and burdens Doria inherits result in invention and curses, spiraling into creative territory that one would think reflect Guène's own predilection for making up stories that she has spoken about it in interviews. Being transported to new locations and story-telling techniques are the meat of a great read, and I would recommend the same ride to anyone.
Natasha
Absolutely a must-read to see the other side of France, the immigrants'side. I was skeptical about this book but found myself absolutely glued to every page. Even though the author is quite young, the prose is flowing and her witty sarcasm and humor color every page. I would think this is a great book for a teenager. It is a glimpse into everything that is not so glamorous about living in France, more of the real side, the dirty Paris and everything they don't usually mention when they talk abou Absolutely a must-read to see the other side of France, the immigrants'side. I was skeptical about this book but found myself absolutely glued to every page. Even though the author is quite young, the prose is flowing and her witty sarcasm and humor color every page. I would think this is a great book for a teenager. It is a glimpse into everything that is not so glamorous about living in France, more of the real side, the dirty Paris and everything they don't usually mention when they talk about France. Loved it.
Alicia
I wanted to like Kiffe Kiffe Demain more. Coming of age story. Abandonment and daddy issues, drowning in poverty. The story resolution felt cheap to me. The author could have shown her growing as a young woman without focusing on her finding value in herself because of a boyfriend. It didn't seem necessary when her home life was finally becoming stable after instability, when she's succeeding in school and has a vision for her future.

Eh.
Lauren
Life in this suburb is not about cheerleading and homecomings. The short chapters in this book are written from the perspective of a Muslim teenage girl living in one of the poorest suburbs of Paris. Her view of her family, neighbors, school and the French welfare system is real and speaks at the level of an intelligent young woman who is well aware of her situation. Serious but enjoyable all the way through...
Rowan
so far so good...

**update**
really excellent book. a Moroccan teenager growing up in the suburbs of Paris, with her mother, after her father leaves them to go back to Morocco. I love Doria as a protagonist. She's feisty, vulnerable, fierce and wistful all in one. I love how she phrases things and the way she reacts to the world around them.

this is a short, quick read, almost on the level of a Bridget Jones book, but less superficial. definitely worth checking out.
Malachy
La vie en banlieue de la perspective d'une adolescente issue de l'immigration maghrébine - ou, si on préfère, l’équivalent français de “Dans la dèche...“ d’Orwell mais - pour une fois - directement de la source. En gros, un livre qui raconte les combats quotidiens, les absurdités et les banalités de la vie en banlieue de la part d'une jeune fille de la cité qui se trouve coincée entre les préjugés de la société qui l'entoure et la misogynie de certains de ses voisins.
Je kiffe!

Christine
This book takes us through a year in the life of a Muslim teenage girl living in the projects on the outskirts of Paris. It's full of humor and insight, as well as being a quick read. I had wanted to get a hold of it in the original French, and I think it would be even more fun to read that way.

One of the sad parts about it was realizing how much American pop culture has seeped into France.
Megan Clarke
more like 3.5- i did like it, took a bit to warm up but then i was surprised about my depth of feelings about the characters. the end wasn't earth shaking but seemed to fit and even ended a bit on a up note, which wasn't completely expected. not sure how much my knowledge of the author's only being 19 when she wrote it played into my enjoyment but regardless it was an interesting dip into a life and culture i didn't know anything about.
Nina
Great coming of age story of a Moroccan girl in Paris that touches on the issues of class, racial, and gender inequality. While it’s not listed as a Young Adult book, I think this is a great read for teenage girls. Not only does the novel facilitate consciousness raising, but does so with all the humor, angst, fear, and joy that informs adolescence.
Katie M.
Not an amazing book, but a snappy and funny and clear-eyed snapshot of the Paris suburbs from the point of view of the daughter of Moroccan immigrants. Recommended for white Americans who don't know anything about the Paris suburbs except maybe that some Arab kids bombed some cars there or whatever.
Jeanmarie
A pretty good example of a first-person novel written by a 19-yr-old. The character in the book isn't French-Algerian, but the writer is. The other day one of my students told me that France never had a civil rights movement. Shocking, yes, but I had to admit I didn't know too much about it myself. I know just a little bit more now.
Ann-Marie
Read it for Alliance francaise book club. It's very well written, smart, funny ... and really sympathetic toward immigrants and in particular the North Africans living in the banlieus outside Paris. Makes it plain how ugly the nonimmigrants can be. It also seems to make an argument in favor of the kinds of democracies that invest in social programs.
Marie
3.5 stars

I had to read this book for class, while it was better than most books I have had to read in history and politics classes the narrator of the story seemed batty and annoyed me a lot, however this could be put down to the fact this is more of a teenage coming of age book and I am quite a bit older tha the target demographic.
William
An interesting narrative from a young daughter of Algerian immigrants in France -- and the inevitable problems facing Arab-French immigrants in suburban Paris...not to mention the problems of a typical teen. A bit uneven at times, but Faïza Guène still gives us a fascinating look into teen angst mixed with racial tension in the City of Light.
Jasmine
The story of an Algerian French girl and her mother, written by a Morrocan French woman. It is honest and revealing in her descriptions of ghetto life, condescending adults, impossible decisions and restricted choices. I didn't realize this was intended for young adults when I picked it up, that might explain the syrupy ending.
Nisrin
A very angry Algerian girl whose parent immigrated to Paris, France. Father left illiterate Mom for younger women back in Algeria that would bear him a son. First daughter ignored and not happy about when Dad left for old country. Disdain, anger but somewhat light-hearted at times. Too much of a "poor me" for my tastes.
Becca
Really quick read. I've seen the slums in the suburbs of Paris on the news. Doris's story personalizes the frustration and the constant push-back that so many immigrant youth experience. I'll definitely recommend it to my World Lit. students.
Anne Kat Alexander
Je l'ai lu peut-être trop vitement car je doit le lire pour un cours. Pour une Américaine étudiant le français, c'est utile pour apprendre la langue courant et aussi apprendre de la culture populaire et aux banlieues.
Hanna
such great examination of immigrant population in the parisian suburbs. and also just a glimpse into the mind of an angsty emotional self concious teenage girl. she just happens to be moroccan growing up in paris. very interesting examination of current language.
Mona Kareem
C'est cool !!! Je sais pas qu'est ce qui me laisse l'aimer !! C'est en langue familiere, la fille Doria, le personnage principale, est tres pessimiste au debut de l'histoire, elle raconte des choses -à mon avis- qui sont débiles des fois ; et pourtant j'ai aimé le roman KIFFE KIFFE DEMAIN !!
Mimi
Très mignon avec beaucoup du coeur. Un choix excellent pour des étudiants de français au lycée ou à l'université. De plus il montre une côté de la vie contemporaine française peu représentée dans le curriculum des cours de français communs : la perspective musulmane maghrébine. Recommandé !
Gwen
It's quite a cynical outlook on life from a growing teenage girl. It's more humorous in many parts after living in N.Africa. It provides a good overall view of what a different type of life might look like.
Mona
The story is full of strong Muslim women responding to difficult circumstances while living in France far from their home countries, the story is sad, funny and portrays the rage and intelligence of young Doria who recognizes by the end of the book how much she has grown.
Majd Hamad
Well, i am sorry to say this but it wasn't worth reading, hopefully that's because it is translated, but i didn't like it at all..
The classic usual, boring type of story we all know and got used to.
Hopefully the original is a good one!!!
Leena-Maaretta Dixon
Funny-sad story of a girl facing poverty and racism. Also features a lovely side plot of the protagonist mother, who learns to read. Recommended for people who like tragicomic novels or to people who enjoy multicultural YA reads.
Cathy
As my friend Nathan described it, it's sort of a Morroco-French Catcher in the Rye. It's a great read on adolescence, and also eye-opening for anyone unfamiliar with life in the troubled suburbs of Paris.
Molly
I read this years ago and decided to read it again to finish out my 50 book challenge, but I definitely remember it being better than it was this time around. I think it could have been better if it was a little more detailed, or maybe I'm just too old for coming of age novels.
Saleem Khashan
this gives a good insight into women immigrants of north african countries in france, these women are known to excel and go places while the men trade drugs and are unemployed. entertaining not excellent if the subject of matter doesnt matter to you.
Norah
Interesting insight into a teenage life in Paris, written by said teenager of a single parent, with some glaring grammatical errors, and generally somewhat boring, as it didn't seem to be going anywhaere. However maybe some teenager will like it!

beatricereads
Davvero bello, moderno, adatto a tutte le età perchè tratta le tematiche di una normale adolscente trasferitasi dall'estero nella città francese che non riesce ad adattarsi anche a causa del quartiere marginale in cui vive.
Ida Munther
got about halfway through, the main character was annoying, i really didn't like it
Mike Duffy
Iread this for for an English course entitled, "The World is a Ghetto." The book is about a Arab girl growing up in the projects in Paris, France.
Anna
totally follows the spirit of Calixthe Beyala and raises questions about immigration and identity that are relevant not just in Paris, but in the Us as well.
Karen
Quick read but not sure what it was trying to say, other than, as you grow up you change your thinking.
Sarah
(Read in French). Really interesting about a teenager's life in a suburb of Paris.
Naomi Jackson
yes, yes. this book about a young woman growing up in the suburbs outside paris hits the spot.
Gregory
Gorgeous evocation of the sadness and the humor of life in la banlieue.
Whitney
it reads like a 15 year old from the projects wrote it.
Leave Feeback for Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow
Useful Links