Curtain

Written by: Agatha Christie

Curtain Book Cover
The house guests at Styles seemed perfectly pleasant to Captain Hastings; there was his own daughter Judith, an inoffensive ornithologist called Norton, dashing Mr Allerton, brittle Miss Cole, Doctor Franklin and his fragile wife Barbara , Nurse Craven, Colonel Luttrell and his charming wife, Daisy, and the charismatic Boyd-Carrington. So Hastings was shocked to learn from Hercule Poirot's declaration that one of them was a five-times murderer. True, the ageing detective was crippled with arthritis, but had his deductive instincts finally deserted him?

The novel features Hercule Poirot and Arthur Hastings in their final appearances in Christie's works. It is a country house novel, with all the characters and the murder set in one house. Not only does the novel return the characters to the setting of her first, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, but it reunites Poirot and Hastings, who last appeared together in Dumb Witness in 1937. It was adapted for television in 2013.
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Curtain Reviews

Sarai
Poirot is my favorite Agatha Christie sleuth. I also love the corresponding A&E Poirot series with David Suchet playing the famous Belgian detective (those moustaches!). I have to admit, I have a bit of a crush on the Poirot character. He's so smart, so wonderfully pompous but gentlemanly, a wee bit delicate, slightly neurotic, a loyal friend, and dedicated protector of the innocent. I always enjoy Poirot and Hastings working together and Poirot's gentle chiding of Hastings' deductions.

I con Poirot is my favorite Agatha Christie sleuth. I also love the corresponding A&E Poirot series with David Suchet playing the famous Belgian detective (those moustaches!). I have to admit, I have a bit of a crush on the Poirot character. He's so smart, so wonderfully pompous but gentlemanly, a wee bit delicate, slightly neurotic, a loyal friend, and dedicated protector of the innocent. I always enjoy Poirot and Hastings working together and Poirot's gentle chiding of Hastings' deductions.

I consider Christie's books to be fast, light reading.
from the store: By Antoinette Klein
"Nothing is so sad, in my opinion," muses Captain Hastings, "as the devastation wrought by age." In this final outing for the inimitable Hercule Poirot and his loyal friend Arthur Hastings, the body may be weak but Poirot's brain is still functioning magnificently. A murder will be committed, the famous detective tells his friend, and Hastings must function as Poirot's legs. Aging and failing in health, the once energetic Poirot is now confined to a wheelchair. However, that does not stop the two friends from once again going on the hunt together in a case Poirot himself tells Hastings will be his last case but his most interesting one. As a special bonus for Poirot fans, we return once again to Styles, the scene of Poirot's first adventure. A near-death of one woman followed by the actual death of another, a sadist who is able to convince others to murder, a most surprising act by Hastings himself, a peep through a keyhole, a visit to a faithful valet, and murder most symmetrical are clues that lead to the uncovering of the criminal Poirot has come to Styles to unmask. Surely, this must rank as one of Christie's finest as we bid a fond adieu to Hercule Poirot.

Miguel
Creio que entender uma obra passa muito por entender quem a escreve e o contexto em que foi escrita.

Agatha Christie escreveu Cai o Pano na década de 40 e só o veio a publicar em 1975, poucos meses antes da sua morte. Escreveu um desfecho para Poirot porque estava saturada. Porém, compreendia que era aquilo que o público gostava e queria. Foi, assim, apenas publicado 30 anos depois quando percebeu que, fruto da idade, não conseguia escrever mais.

O último caso de Poirot tem palco no mesmo sítio Creio que entender uma obra passa muito por entender quem a escreve e o contexto em que foi escrita.

Agatha Christie escreveu Cai o Pano na década de 40 e só o veio a publicar em 1975, poucos meses antes da sua morte. Escreveu um desfecho para Poirot porque estava saturada. Porém, compreendia que era aquilo que o público gostava e queria. Foi, assim, apenas publicado 30 anos depois quando percebeu que, fruto da idade, não conseguia escrever mais.

O último caso de Poirot tem palco no mesmo sítio em que ocorreu o primeiro, ambos partilhados com o Capitão Hastings.

O enredo é, à boa maneira de Agatha Christie, delicioso e formidável. Ficando próximo, mas, ainda assim, atrás de Morte no Nilo (o meu favorito).

Reservo para Hercule Poirot um lugar especial no meu coração, sabendo que em 1975, não era o velho detetive belga que acabava, mas a própria Rainha do Crime.
Shreya (☆High Lady of The Night Court☆)
The reason I don't review Agatha Christie books is ... well I don't know how to to do them justice. In general all the books I've read are amazing and I will continue to read her books forever. Agatha Christie's books are probably the most interesting crime novels anyone will ever read(If anyone finds something better-please inform me). I'm not one for single crime novels since we don't see the characters and can't really connect with them, but Agatha Christie's books shall always remain an exce The reason I don't review Agatha Christie books is ... well I don't know how to to do them justice. In general all the books I've read are amazing and I will continue to read her books forever. Agatha Christie's books are probably the most interesting crime novels anyone will ever read(If anyone finds something better-please inform me). I'm not one for single crime novels since we don't see the characters and can't really connect with them, but Agatha Christie's books shall always remain an exception for me.
This book is the story of Hercule Poirot's last case and the plot is spectacular. I don't think the plot in the book could really happen without it being Poirot's last case(which is still very sad) and it exhibits all his skills and I really loved it. It was a fitting conclusion to a legendary detective. :)
Like all the other Agatha Christie books I've read I give it 5 stars.
(view spoiler)[
THAT ENDING THOUGH .............. Poirot dies :,( I felt so bad. (hide spoiler)]
The Mystery of the Blue Train :: Dame Agatha Abroad: Murder on the Orient Express / They Came to Bagdad / Murder in Mesopotamia :: The Woman Warrior :: Like Life :: The Monk Downstairs
Bekah
Such a clever story, so complex and twisted. There was a lot of waiting and wondering, not just figuring out who the perpetrator would be, but also who the victim would be and even how the crime would play out. I enjoyed being left in the dark like Hastings, trying to formulate an idea and work it out before it was all revealed. A wonderful farewell to Hercule Poirot.
Mara
The mystery wrap up of this book didn't work for me, but everything else did. I was surprised by what an emotional read this was for me-- this turned out to be a profoundly moving novel about grief, regret, and moving forward. I'm so sad I have no new Poirot left to read... I'll have to sustain myself with rereads
Elizabeth
Very sad. I will have to ponder the ending of this one for a while to decide how I feel.
fenrir
Piacevole, come tutti i libri della Christie, però non mi ha catturata come speravo.
Ovviamente ero curiosa di sapere chi fosse veramente X, e non è facile pensare ad un colpevole che sia completamente estraneo ai fatti e che quindi non abbia nessuna motivazione per uccidere la vittima ed infatti non avevo capito chi fosse (ammetto che non mi ero nemmeno impegnata questa volta, ho letto il libro solo per godermelo e divertirmi).
Il problema del libro sono i personaggi, insulsi. Franklin lo trovo Piacevole, come tutti i libri della Christie, però non mi ha catturata come speravo.
Ovviamente ero curiosa di sapere chi fosse veramente X, e non è facile pensare ad un colpevole che sia completamente estraneo ai fatti e che quindi non abbia nessuna motivazione per uccidere la vittima ed infatti non avevo capito chi fosse (ammetto che non mi ero nemmeno impegnata questa volta, ho letto il libro solo per godermelo e divertirmi).
Il problema del libro sono i personaggi, insulsi. Franklin lo trovo tremendo, giustificarlo dicendo che la moglie era una palla al piede per lui è una cavolata enorme sopratutto quando lo si giustifica con "era così leale! era contro il divorzio infatti" ma allora sei idiota perché tu non la amavi, lei non ti amava ma sei contro il divorzio? fedele (solo con i fatti FORSE poi perché scommetto che non lo sarebbe stato a lungo con Judith attorno) ma infelici entrambi? che genio questo. Barbara è una lagna incredibile, non sa nemmeno avvelenare il marito.
Judith è uno dei personaggi più odiosi mai incontrati in un libro, è vero che Hastings sbaglia molto con lei ma lei è veramente un calcio dei denti. Odia Barbara e cerca di giustificarsi con "non ammira abbastanza il marito!" quando la verità è "mi farei suo marito ma non posso perché c'è lei!" e perché il marito è un idiota contro il divorzio ovviamente. Motivazioni di lei e Franklin sull'uccidere i deboli ed i malati poi sono motivazioni da veri nazi wannabe, tremende. E Poirot la giustifica anche dicendo "ma è una ragazza intelligente! e lui pure" o vabbè, fortuna allora perché se erano idioti che succedeva?. L'infermeria non pervenuta, l'avevo considerata colpevole ma effettivamente l'avevo sopravvalutata, gli altri davvero non pervenuti.

In generale mi aspettavo qualcosa di più? pensavo avrebbe cercato di incastrare Hastings con la storia delle aspirine, quello si che sarebbe stato un colpo di scena! ed invece niente. Ho apprezzato la fine di Poirot, per niente scenica ma molto reale.
Tony
Last summer, at an estate auction, I found a beautiful collection of about 50 leatherbound Agatha Christie books - the kind that come from a subscriptlon book club once a month at the rate of about $30 each. I managed to get the whole set for $50 and am slowly making my way through the (I'm only too sad to say) many that I've never read before.

This one is listed as Hercule Poirot's Last Case. It's true; he's dead! It was either this one or The Mysterious Affair at Styles, and I don't know why I Last summer, at an estate auction, I found a beautiful collection of about 50 leatherbound Agatha Christie books - the kind that come from a subscriptlon book club once a month at the rate of about $30 each. I managed to get the whole set for $50 and am slowly making my way through the (I'm only too sad to say) many that I've never read before.

This one is listed as Hercule Poirot's Last Case. It's true; he's dead! It was either this one or The Mysterious Affair at Styles, and I don't know why I grabbed this one first, as they both take place in the same house in Styles - one as Poirot's first case and the other as the last.

A good quick read. I understand that after this book came out the New York Times published Poirot's obituary - the only fictional character honored in this manner by the Times.....

Unfortunately, this is one of those books where the clues are not made available to the reader until Poirot's final letter to Hastings following the actual passing of events in the plot. A bit frustrating.....

Subhojit
spellbound by the twists and turns... indeed the Dame has surpassed herself in this novel. Poirot's swan song simply "does not get no gooder than this". Though his last and final case and our hero is confined(?) to a wheelchair his little grey cells have little shine lost. They are still as active( if not more) as the 1st murder at Styles. It is with a heavy heart that one puts down the book realizing there will not again be the moment of the little Belgian chastising his companion regarding the spellbound by the twists and turns... indeed the Dame has surpassed herself in this novel. Poirot's swan song simply "does not get no gooder than this". Though his last and final case and our hero is confined(?) to a wheelchair his little grey cells have little shine lost. They are still as active( if not more) as the 1st murder at Styles. It is with a heavy heart that one puts down the book realizing there will not again be the moment of the little Belgian chastising his companion regarding the lack of symmetry or for overlooking the obvious. But... yes there is a big but... the final case is the best one even eclipsing Roger Ackroyd which I believed until today to be her masterpiece. Certainly worth every penny and second you put in it!!!
Colin Mitchell
The final Poirot mystery. This is one of the better Poirot stories and was written some 30 years before its publication at probably Christies best period. Poirot is concerned over 5 murders with different perpetrators and is gather with a party at Styles which is where his adventures with Hastings started. He has sent George, his man, away and appears to be disabled with arthritis. All may not be as it seems apart from his heart disease. Well written with a good set of characters, two deaths and The final Poirot mystery. This is one of the better Poirot stories and was written some 30 years before its publication at probably Christies best period. Poirot is concerned over 5 murders with different perpetrators and is gather with a party at Styles which is where his adventures with Hastings started. He has sent George, his man, away and appears to be disabled with arthritis. All may not be as it seems apart from his heart disease. Well written with a good set of characters, two deaths and some -one else injured. The end may not be as expected.
Bill
This is my token Christie entry on the bookshelf. Actually, from 1967-1976 I read every novel, except for the two posthumous ones. Some of the last were sadly downhill (Passenger to Frankfurt), but even when I thought I had her figured out, which happened more often after 40 or 50 books, she could still catch me, especially "The Secret of Chimneys," or was it "The Moving Finger." I can't remember now. I had "Sleeping Murder" figured partway through, but she got her revenge with "Curtain." I neve This is my token Christie entry on the bookshelf. Actually, from 1967-1976 I read every novel, except for the two posthumous ones. Some of the last were sadly downhill (Passenger to Frankfurt), but even when I thought I had her figured out, which happened more often after 40 or 50 books, she could still catch me, especially "The Secret of Chimneys," or was it "The Moving Finger." I can't remember now. I had "Sleeping Murder" figured partway through, but she got her revenge with "Curtain." I never even saw it coming. What a great way to pass time from junior high through college.
Abby
Curtain is the final Hercule Poirot novel. And no, I have not read all 39 of them. I just pick up a random Agatha Christie every now and then based on recommendations. In this particular Poirot mystery, the famous detective investigates a serial killer he calls X, who has to be one of the people currently residing in the Hastings household. True to Agatha Christie form, we had fantastic twist endings as to who X was.
fraulein
Perpisahan yang menyedihkan, pembunuh yang ngga bisa dituduh. Tapi lucunya sebelum tirai ditutup, Poirot masih sempet-sempetnya jadi mak comblang. Bikin sedih sekaligus gemes.

(view spoiler)[
Pembunuh dengan motif acak yang menciptakan kondisi supaya orang lain yang melempar batu dan kena orang lainnya lagi sampe berdarah-darah sementara dia siul-siul di belakang sambil nonton peristiwa pelemparan batu itu memang luar binasah.

Dan Poirot akhirnya jadi pembunuh juga. (hide spoiler)]
Kim
Okay, now, if you're interested in reading a Christie novel, please save this one for later. It is I believe the last of her Hercule Poirot novels, thus you should definitely pick up at least a few of her earlier Poirots before this. Having said that, this has got to be one of her best!

P.S. If you're taking a long road trip, Christie's books are great as audiobooks!!
Anastasia
A typical Hercule Poirot mystery which is always entertaining no matter how many times I have read it. A bit sad as it is his final case.
Harini
The ending of this is book is something, I m sure I will never forget or never stop pondering over. A fitting finale to the character whom I m hopelessly in love with.
Teri-K
I first read this many years ago, before I became a Poirot fan. (Thank you David Suchet.) At that time I found Poirot affected and boring and Hastings a bumbling idiot, though I loved Miss Marple and enjoyed Tommy and Tuppence, as well as her other books. I remember not liking this book much.

This time around I have a greater appreciation for Poirot and Hastings. Though this book could really be called Hasting's last case, as Poirot plays only a very small part. I enjoyed getting to know more ab I first read this many years ago, before I became a Poirot fan. (Thank you David Suchet.) At that time I found Poirot affected and boring and Hastings a bumbling idiot, though I loved Miss Marple and enjoyed Tommy and Tuppence, as well as her other books. I remember not liking this book much.

This time around I have a greater appreciation for Poirot and Hastings. Though this book could really be called Hasting's last case, as Poirot plays only a very small part. I enjoyed getting to know more about Hastings and his family and watching him cope with the world that is changing quickly around him. If Poirot has only a few scenes, his presence is still throughout the book as he's the one who sets everything in motion.

Here we come to one of the points that I really enjoyed. This book doesn't open with a particular crime, instead Poirot is concerned with several past crimes, all of which have been solved by confessions or convictions. But he is not happy. Instead he believes that these unrelated cases were all perpetrated by "X", who has entirely escaped notice. And Poirot believes "X" will strike again. So he calls Hastings back to Chimneys, where their first case together occured, and uses him as his eyes and ears.

Unfortunately Hastings isn't a deep thinker and he jumps to many wrong conclusions. Most of the book consists of him bumbling around suspecting the wrong people and generally making a mess of things. However, Christie is fair to her reader and everything we need to know to solve the crimes is in the story; you just have to remember not to believe everything Hastings thinks.

I felt that Poirot went too far in not explaining the heart of the case to Hastings. It was totally unreasonable of him to expect his friend could figure it out on his own, and Poirot knew that but as the reader had to be kept in the dark so did Hastings. Still, I wished Christie had come up with stronger motivation for that part. (Hastings own life would have been at risk, perhaps?) I had to rate the book down for this, as it's was very annoying for me that Poirot refused to explain things to his friend. That part just didn't really work.

Also the book felt modern to me - discussions of divorce and such, while I prefer the books that are firmly set in pre-modern times. So be prepared for that. Since Christie wrote this during WWII and set it aside for publication after her death it's a tribute to her writing skills.

I listened to Hugh Fraser narrate this, (he played Hastings opposite Suchet), and enjoyed it very much. I like his narrations or Suchet's for these books, they are excellent actors and convey the stories well.
Molli B.
This was great. Sad, too! But really enjoyable. I can't imagine how I would have felt if I'd been reading these books all along and then they ended. I'm sure I would have been beside myself for YEARS.

Good mystery, good friendship stuff with Poirot and Hastings. A very satisfying story all around.
Mitra (mitra_bookish_girl)
Story of a man who manipulates people to take lives and thus destroys them while hiding behind and enjoying himself for being powerful enough to make people do what he likes them to do, without being practically involved in a crime. A mind blowing read.
Rebecca (areadersrambles)
I didn't cry but it was a close call! HOW DARE YOU POIROT :o
Hasnamezied
I read this book along time ago and still remember the ending,I cried a lot .

Thank you Agatha Christie for giving us Hercule Poirot's character which amused us by his wit, intelligence and funny comments.

Long live the Queen.
Antonella Ingolotti
Christie dandole un final a las grandes aventuras de Hércules Poirot. Tal vez un poco inesperado o no tan elaborado como se creería (ya que Poirot siempre nos dejaría con ganas de un poco más), pero siempre memorable.
Dion Yulianto
Terima kasih Papa Poirot, terima kasih Tante Agatha Christie. Hiks ....

https://dionyulianto.blogspot.co.id/2...
Margaret
Aptly named, Curtain is Poirot's final showing. It was written much before its 1975 publication date (here for more historical perspective on the later Christie works), which gives some perspective considering Christie planned on ending Poirot this way before she finally published it the year before her death.

Curtain shows Poirot come full circle. Hastings is back as narrator after an extensive break and after having a whole family life in Argentina while Poirot, his old crime fighting buddy, k Aptly named, Curtain is Poirot's final showing. It was written much before its 1975 publication date (here for more historical perspective on the later Christie works), which gives some perspective considering Christie planned on ending Poirot this way before she finally published it the year before her death.

Curtain shows Poirot come full circle. Hastings is back as narrator after an extensive break and after having a whole family life in Argentina while Poirot, his old crime fighting buddy, kept up with catching the murderers. Hastings arrives at Styles, the site of Poirot's and his first case together, with Poirot a physical wreck and a house full of potential murderers. Hastings himself is worried about his daughter, who may or may not be carrying on with a married research scientist who also may or may not be a murderer. Things get complicated fast, in the style of Christie's earlier work.

I thought the ending was particularly tricky. While the non-mystery ending was very sad, it was a very fitting to conclude the series. Enough said, go read it now please if you've read the rest of the Poirot series. It really should be read last, just like the recommended reading order from the Christie official site here.

On a more personal note: I finished reading Curtain the day I graduated from college, since it was my goal to finish the Poirot mysteries by the time I finished my undergraduate education. Poirot has been a great companion on many planes, trips home, snowed out flights, swine flu outbreaks, and stressful semesters. So, unless another Poirot short story is found somewhere in Christie's notebooks, this is the end. (Except maybe a future re-read)
rabbitprincess
A brilliant book. Hastings and Poirot return to the scene of their very first case, Styles. It is supposed to be 30 years after that case, but Poirot's chronology is rather messed up. It was published just before Christie died, so she probably did not have time to make any edits.

In any case, the mystery itself is a corker. Poirot has found five unrelated murders, and he is convinced that a single person, X, is behind them all, even though they all had tidy explanations that admitted no other par A brilliant book. Hastings and Poirot return to the scene of their very first case, Styles. It is supposed to be 30 years after that case, but Poirot's chronology is rather messed up. It was published just before Christie died, so she probably did not have time to make any edits.

In any case, the mystery itself is a corker. Poirot has found five unrelated murders, and he is convinced that a single person, X, is behind them all, even though they all had tidy explanations that admitted no other parties for the role of murderer. He is convinced that X is at Styles, and so he enlists his younger, more nimble friend Hastings to help him solve the mystery.

Admittedly, if you get frustrated with Poirot not wanting to reveal facts to Hastings simply because the time is not right, there's a lot of that in this book. But the story is a treat and if you're clever you might guess whodunnit. I didn't remember whodunnit from the last time I read it, so I enjoyed going along for the ride with Hastings.

Christie's writing is also very evocative -- even today the chapter where Poirot dies brings tears to my eyes... or rather, the first few sentences of the following chapter. This is how Hastings begins:

I don't want to write about it at all.

I want, you see, to think about it as little as possible. Hercule Poirot was dead -- and with him died a good part of Arthur Hastings.

These sentences, simple as they are, carry a great deal of emotional heft. To anyone who has lost a dear friend, they ring of truth.

For little gems like this and the overall intrigue of the plot, and of course the fact that it is the end for Poirot (and as such is highly significant in the Christie canon), Curtain gets five stars.
Edel
I have loved all Agatha Christie's stories that contained the wonderful Belgian Detective Hercule Poirot but this was the only book I put off reading because I thought I would have a lump in my throat while reading some of it.
The story begins when Hastings receives a letter from his old friend Hercule Poirot inviting him to come for a visit to Styles. Here friends and many mysteries awaits.
The story is a charming one, if a little sad, but it is a must for all fans of Poirot .
Great characters I have loved all Agatha Christie's stories that contained the wonderful Belgian Detective Hercule Poirot but this was the only book I put off reading because I thought I would have a lump in my throat while reading some of it.
The story begins when Hastings receives a letter from his old friend Hercule Poirot inviting him to come for a visit to Styles. Here friends and many mysteries awaits.
The story is a charming one, if a little sad, but it is a must for all fans of Poirot .
Great characters, great storyline and more then a few surprises.
This was the first time I felt like I got to really see Hastings in a Poirot book and I did enjoy that but a little let down by him too. His daughter is a very unlikeable character in this book and the way he did not retaliate when she talked down to him really bugged me. If she was a real person I would not want to have anything to do with her. Hastings needs more gumption!
In this book the great detective has really gone down hill health wise and even though he does not seem to be very well physically his old grey matter still sparkles. He can really unravel a complicated situation into bite sized pieces that are easy to understand in a short space of time and it is very enjoyable to read, the entire time you read you have those little "lightbulb" moments as the story progresses . I love that!
I will read this book again ....even though it is sad in parts it is tremendously good. This was one of the most surprising books that contained my favourite detective.
As you will likely already know this was the last book from Agatha Christie featuring Mr Poirot and
he has been and will remain one of my favourite fictional detective characters ever!
Kelly B
In Curtain, Arthur Hastings has returned to Styles at the urging of Hercule Poirot. Poirot is in ill health, and requires Hastings to be his "eyes and ears" so to speak: Poirot is convinced there is going to be another murder committed at Styles. Problem is, he doesn't know who the victim will be, nor will he tell Hastings who the murderer is.

Unfortunately, I had several things I disliked about this book. Several of the characters (in particular Dr. Franklin and Judith Hastings) were very unlike In Curtain, Arthur Hastings has returned to Styles at the urging of Hercule Poirot. Poirot is in ill health, and requires Hastings to be his "eyes and ears" so to speak: Poirot is convinced there is going to be another murder committed at Styles. Problem is, he doesn't know who the victim will be, nor will he tell Hastings who the murderer is.

Unfortunately, I had several things I disliked about this book. Several of the characters (in particular Dr. Franklin and Judith Hastings) were very unlikeable. Normally that wouldn't bother me, but a few of the statements they made and their general attitudes had me wishing within the first few pages that they'd be offed. The disturbing statements almost had a pro-Nazi bent, with characters discussing how they believed "idiots", "cretins", and handicapped people (basically anyone unable to contribute to society) should be killed. There's also a surplus of sexism; women are portrayed as either beautiful and young, old and bossy, or mentally ill. "Though actually the girl concerned was a neurotic type and came of poor stock" Poirot comments at one point. I realize the book was written in the 1950s (?); even so I thought attitudes were a tad more advanced than that back then? Maybe not! Either way, it irritated me enough that I held it against the book;-).

But the main reason I disliked this book was the (this is just my opinion, don't shoot me) ridiculously stupid and implausible ending. Dumb, dumb, dumb! Probably the worst murder mystery ending I've ever read.

I do plan on reading more of Christie's work. I've read one or two of her other books and liked them.
Maria
No había leído antes el último caso de Poirot. Me ha dado pena despedirme del buen detective, extravagante pero inteligente, que sabe leer la naturaleza humana y juntar todas las piezas del puzzle para entregarnos un culpable.
Siempre me ha parecido magistral la forma que tiene Agatha de presentarnos sus casos, tantos libros, todos diferentes y con un final inesperado. Es imposible que no te guste. Para mi es y será siempre la reina del suspense.
Peter
"Hercule Poirot's famous last case is a rather sad and melancholy book, despite being penned in the 1940s when Agatha was at the height of her powers. Neatly, Poirot is joined by his loyal companion Hastings at Styles, the estate where they first met and solved their first murder together in the 1920s. But Poirot is older, physically spent, and Hastings is haunted by the memory of his dead wife and bothered by his (live) cool, intellectual daughter.

They investigate a killer "X", the identity of "Hercule Poirot's famous last case is a rather sad and melancholy book, despite being penned in the 1940s when Agatha was at the height of her powers. Neatly, Poirot is joined by his loyal companion Hastings at Styles, the estate where they first met and solved their first murder together in the 1920s. But Poirot is older, physically spent, and Hastings is haunted by the memory of his dead wife and bothered by his (live) cool, intellectual daughter.

They investigate a killer "X", the identity of whom is known to Poirot throughout the novel. X has a most unusual modus operandi which is thrilling when the solution points out the two or three passionate acts in a scientific and cold novel. Even reliable, simple Hastings is strung to his farthest passions. The solution is amazing and so well explained by Poirot, with the exception of mechanics, which is seemingly glossed over in one sentence. Very unusual.

I thought the characters were a bit stilted and oversimplified in this one, but intriguing story. It's great to see Agatha writing so much better than her last dozen years or so. Overall, very satisfying and recommended to most readers. As for the fantastic twist at the end, to quote my uncle, "Oh, Agatha! How could you!"
Shruthi Natarajan
** SPOILERS** I am literally in tears right now. Sneha, I advise you to read this only when you feel you should. I know, that's the worst advice anyone could give, but seriously. This book will make you crawl to a corner, and just cry.

Amazing plot though. It was so hard to wrap my head around!!! Instigation... crime... aahh. All too much for one mind to perceive. I find that I do not possess the little grey cells that Poirot so often mentions. BUT WHY CHRISTIE!!!!!?? Oh my gosh. POIROT I MISS y ** SPOILERS** I am literally in tears right now. Sneha, I advise you to read this only when you feel you should. I know, that's the worst advice anyone could give, but seriously. This book will make you crawl to a corner, and just cry.

Amazing plot though. It was so hard to wrap my head around!!! Instigation... crime... aahh. All too much for one mind to perceive. I find that I do not possess the little grey cells that Poirot so often mentions. BUT WHY CHRISTIE!!!!!?? Oh my gosh. POIROT I MISS yOU SO BADLY! WHY DID YOU HAVE TO gah. :( I can't do anything right now. Poor Hastings, and Oh, how I hate Judith! Anyway. Not that it matters anymore. Lovely plotline, brilliant psychology, and absolutely heart wrenching end.

Well. I have officially finished my Best of Agatha list. Now it is time to fill in the spaces whenever I am free, with other books of hers.

Maybe I shall read another book. But that book will certainly not be Christie's for a while. I have to get over the sadness that I have faced today.
Connie
I've been re-reading and newly reading Agatha Christie lately. I started as a medicinal for the Congressional (House of Reps, talkin' to you) stupidity over the wasteful and harmful government shutdown, and the rush again to the fiscal cliff of the debt ceiling. (Yes, cut the deficit but not with a bloody hatchet.) Dame Agatha's mysteries, astringent and logical, clever and insightful, humorous and dazzling --who can think of fools and foolishness with her even voice in your ears?

It seems as if I've been re-reading and newly reading Agatha Christie lately. I started as a medicinal for the Congressional (House of Reps, talkin' to you) stupidity over the wasteful and harmful government shutdown, and the rush again to the fiscal cliff of the debt ceiling. (Yes, cut the deficit but not with a bloody hatchet.) Dame Agatha's mysteries, astringent and logical, clever and insightful, humorous and dazzling --who can think of fools and foolishness with her even voice in your ears?

It seems as if some of her short stories might have been exercises for her novels. The Mysterious Affair at Styles, a shorter novel written in 1916 and published four years later, could have served a similar purpose for her tour de force, Curtain. Curtain, Poirot's Last Case, was written in the early 1940s during World War II and locked in a vault to be published in 1975.

Anybody who blurts a spoiler about this incomparable mystery should be...well, shot symmetrically mid-forehead.

Re-read in 2016. Just as good as on my earlier read(s).
Alberto
I read this back in high school and would have rated it around 4 stars. However, I had not then read Othello. I also wasn't married with children. On a reread, I have to up it to 5 stars.

The mystery is brilliant. But more important than that, this is the most ... human ... of Christie's books. We see Hastings widowed and lonely and having conflict with his daughter. He's a real character in a way he wasn't in any of the earlier 7 novels (heck, in the original Styles, he doesn't even have a first I read this back in high school and would have rated it around 4 stars. However, I had not then read Othello. I also wasn't married with children. On a reread, I have to up it to 5 stars.

The mystery is brilliant. But more important than that, this is the most ... human ... of Christie's books. We see Hastings widowed and lonely and having conflict with his daughter. He's a real character in a way he wasn't in any of the earlier 7 novels (heck, in the original Styles, he doesn't even have a first name). And we see Poirot old and frail and frustrated at his inability to crack the perfect crime.

But best of all we get to say goodbye to our beloved characters in style, unlike Sleeping Murder which was an appalling end to the Marple series (probably Christie couldn't bring herself to kill Miss Marple).
Shaunak Bhattacharya
initially i thought of reading this book as my last Poirot...coz I knew that Poirot won't be there at the end...but still...couldn't resist...

the buildup of the story took a bit of time...that could have been shortened a bit...but once it kept coming...it kept coming...

and that last letter from Poirot explaining all the crimes and the incidents...boy oh boy...i was in for a terrific surprise...a stupendous one...which proved once again...that Agatha christie was not only a thriller writer...she initially i thought of reading this book as my last Poirot...coz I knew that Poirot won't be there at the end...but still...couldn't resist...

the buildup of the story took a bit of time...that could have been shortened a bit...but once it kept coming...it kept coming...

and that last letter from Poirot explaining all the crimes and the incidents...boy oh boy...i was in for a terrific surprise...a stupendous one...which proved once again...that Agatha christie was not only a thriller writer...she also had that amazing gift of toying with human psychology and diving into their depths...which is EXACTLY what i felt after reading Mysterious Affair at Styles the first Poirot...

To me Poirot will rejuvenate again as now i will go back reading to the other unfinished Poirot novels....he will be reincarnated...
Sherri
In a way, I'm glad that I've read this book while I still have more Hercule Poirot mysteries to read as I hate to say goodbye to Poirot, Hastings, Miss Lemon, etc. This story holds your attention all the way through as you, along with Hastings, try to figure out not only who the murderer is, but also who will be murdered. While it is sad to read of Poirot's failing health, we the readers, along with Hastings, must face the inevitability of death for us all. It is fitting that Poirot's first nove In a way, I'm glad that I've read this book while I still have more Hercule Poirot mysteries to read as I hate to say goodbye to Poirot, Hastings, Miss Lemon, etc. This story holds your attention all the way through as you, along with Hastings, try to figure out not only who the murderer is, but also who will be murdered. While it is sad to read of Poirot's failing health, we the readers, along with Hastings, must face the inevitability of death for us all. It is fitting that Poirot's first novel takes place at the house of Styles and his last, which begs the question...Is Styles cursed or will Poirot be able to use his little gray cells to prevent tragedy?
Vanessa
I am a big fan of Agatha Christie's crime novels, more so of Hercule Poirot than Miss Marple, her two most famous creations. The case presented in this story is well presented, as I am always apt to think, as my "grey cells" cannot quite compare and my taste for detective work is fairly undeveloped. What I find to detract from this novel is how Poirot's morals, usually an intrinsic part of his personality, are failing him somewhat in this case - or are they? I couldn't have done it any better, b I am a big fan of Agatha Christie's crime novels, more so of Hercule Poirot than Miss Marple, her two most famous creations. The case presented in this story is well presented, as I am always apt to think, as my "grey cells" cannot quite compare and my taste for detective work is fairly undeveloped. What I find to detract from this novel is how Poirot's morals, usually an intrinsic part of his personality, are failing him somewhat in this case - or are they? I couldn't have done it any better, but I feel it is not quite true to the jovial man we know as a matchmaker and a bit of a prankster. Nonetheless, make up your own minds.
Debbie
I really like the solution to this mystery (amazingly, I actually guessed it as one of my wild guesses), but during the reading I felt like she wasn't playing by her normal rules. Well, she wasn't, so I was right.

There was one loose end that was never explained, but I can live with that. My main quibble with the story (and the reason I knocked a star off my rating) was that I didn't like how Poirot and Hastings were behaving during the story. They were behaving believably, but I didn't like seei I really like the solution to this mystery (amazingly, I actually guessed it as one of my wild guesses), but during the reading I felt like she wasn't playing by her normal rules. Well, she wasn't, so I was right.

There was one loose end that was never explained, but I can live with that. My main quibble with the story (and the reason I knocked a star off my rating) was that I didn't like how Poirot and Hastings were behaving during the story. They were behaving believably, but I didn't like seeing their bad sides. Overall, though, it's a good story and well worth reading.
Priya Goyal
As always Agatha Christie doesn't disappoint in yet another intriguing addition to the Hercule Poirot repertoire. This book is Poirot's last case and ends at a bittersweet note for me since I realise that after this, there is no more. It is one of the typical murder mysteries and ends up with Poirot returning to the scene of his first case. Throughout the book he helps prevent a murder as well as stop the mechanisms of a sadistic serial killer with a very unexpected face. All this he does while As always Agatha Christie doesn't disappoint in yet another intriguing addition to the Hercule Poirot repertoire. This book is Poirot's last case and ends at a bittersweet note for me since I realise that after this, there is no more. It is one of the typical murder mysteries and ends up with Poirot returning to the scene of his first case. Throughout the book he helps prevent a murder as well as stop the mechanisms of a sadistic serial killer with a very unexpected face. All this he does while crippled with old age and confined to a chair.
Arush Ul islam
Beautiful book!!

Also quite a sad book, the saddest part was when the greatest detective to protect other people, Hercule Poirot, Kills himself.

Never imagined that Norton would be the murderer.

This novel is full of twists, hats off to Agatha Christie, the way she has written is marvelous.

She has put tremendous efforts in writing this novel.

A complete mystery novel, one can’t even imagine what will happen next.

As well as a must read novel!!
A complete five star for this

Beautiful book!!

Also quite a sad book, the saddest part was when the greatest detective to protect other people, Hercule Poirot, Kills himself.

Never imagined that Norton would be the murderer.

This novel is full of twists, hats off to Agatha Christie, the way she has written is marvelous.

She has put tremendous efforts in writing this novel.

A complete mystery novel, one can’t even imagine what will happen next.

As well as a must read novel!!
A complete five star for this

Travis
Poriot's last case is an odd twisty one and fairly clever, but the bits about the great detective have to deal with getting old and the extra effort he has to put in with his body failing him, as he goes up against a very clever and evil killer gives it another layer.
A bittersweet book, as it has all of Christe's magic, but it is the last Poriot book.I'm at least glad she wrote him a good story to end the series.
Margarida
Não estava a gostar tanto como gostei dos outros livros, praticamente quase até ao último capítulo. achei a narrativa fraca. todavia, o fim não desilude e não poderia ter terminado de outra forma.
(já tinha visto o telefilme há dois anos, pois tenho a série em DVD, mas não me recordava de todos os pormenores).
Bill Lynas
One of the most effective Poirot novels, with an excellent ending. It would have had more impact if it had been published when it was written in the 1940s than thirty years later, but it's still a good read.
Ashley
If you're a Poirot fan, you won't want to miss this series finale that will turn all you thought you knew upside down as we join Hastings and our famous Belgian detective at the infamous Styles' Court, the place where their journey began all those years ago.
Windry
best dari agatha christie! sayangnya saya baca ini pertama dari semua karya christie ^^ jadi begitu baca karya-karya lain terasa kurang.
highly recommended! belum pernah ada ide brilian mengenai metode pembunuhan seperti dalam buku ini. christie memang pakarnya psikologi. hebat!
Deepthi Terenz
I enjoyed it very much, once again Christie fooled me, but the ending of the genius Poirot, I don't think I liked it, cudn't imagine him like that.
Karine
Achei que já tinha lido os melhores livros de Agatha Christie mas não! Esse foi o que mais me surpreendeu até agora. Talvez venha ser o meu favorito da autora.
Indri Febriyanie
this is the first book of Agatha Christie that I read 15 years ago..and after reading this one I read thirty others...hahahahaha
تماضر المهدي
my first time reading Agatha Christie!! now i understand why my dad loves her so much :D :D
Richa
Although it is the last of the Hercule Poirot series, it is one of my favourite of the series. Wonderful book! Really loved it.
Lynn
What a sneaky old lady she was saving up this last Poirot novel. I've not read a lot of these, but I liked this one a lot.
Judy
Oh no. Poirot's final case! I don't think that I can bear it. But despite the fact that Poirot is crippled with arthritis, he is able to use his "little grey cells" to solve this last mystery.
Pauline
Poirot at his best. A perfect end to these stories about the little detective.
Bluerockloud
I’ve always hated books that intentionally keep certain key
evidence away from the reader so that we can’t solve it before
the end, Curtain however succeeds beyond my wildest expectations. Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case accomplishes this as the clues are laid out for you throughout the book so that you solve it yourself. It also helps that the book is an incredibly engaging and satisfying mystery that enthralls the audience.
However, the book’s main draw is how the writing style leads to
of nearly e I’ve always hated books that intentionally keep certain key
evidence away from the reader so that we can’t solve it before
the end, Curtain however succeeds beyond my wildest expectations. Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case accomplishes this as the clues are laid out for you throughout the book so that you solve it yourself. It also helps that the book is an incredibly engaging and satisfying mystery that enthralls the audience.
However, the book’s main draw is how the writing style leads to
of nearly every character that appears in the book.
The writing style of the book brilliantly to the assumptions that we and the main character Hastings make about our surroundings. Each character is wonderfully wrapped in several layers to make an even better mystery. Agatha Christie also uses the “show, don’t tell” rule wonderfully as it defines each character. If I had to choose my most favorite character in this wonderful book, it would have to be M. Poirot for his witty dialogue and his stance on the world.
Shalini
It is with sadness that I write this review, for I am sure to miss the most clever, orderly and methodical Belgian gentleman I could ever come across! Being the last feather in his cap, this novel revolves around carefully chosen characters and a scheme that is very skilfully drafted for them; baffling the reader and racking their little grey cells but summing up perfectly in the end. The story feasts on the thin line between human will and desire. It is definitely a must read for all connoisseu It is with sadness that I write this review, for I am sure to miss the most clever, orderly and methodical Belgian gentleman I could ever come across! Being the last feather in his cap, this novel revolves around carefully chosen characters and a scheme that is very skilfully drafted for them; baffling the reader and racking their little grey cells but summing up perfectly in the end. The story feasts on the thin line between human will and desire. It is definitely a must read for all connoisseurs of crime fiction and the man himself, Hercule Poirot. A befitting end to the HP series. And with great love and affection, 'Ring down the Curtain' is all one could say!!
Nathalie
This was definitely not what I expected. I'll try not to spoil anything, but: First off, I didn't think THAT would actually happen. Second off, I didn't think THAT was what actually did happen. For the last time through Poirot, Christie proves herself to be the Queen of Crime. I could not have anticipated the ending, one way or another. I was pretty shook, to be honest - while I'm aware that I can always reread every single Poirot story (and there are, in fact, quite a few I haven't even read ye This was definitely not what I expected. I'll try not to spoil anything, but: First off, I didn't think THAT would actually happen. Second off, I didn't think THAT was what actually did happen. For the last time through Poirot, Christie proves herself to be the Queen of Crime. I could not have anticipated the ending, one way or another. I was pretty shook, to be honest - while I'm aware that I can always reread every single Poirot story (and there are, in fact, quite a few I haven't even read yet), this was a strangely emotional read, a true farewell and goodbye to one of my all time favourite fictional detectives.
Summerita Rhayne
It's hard to put down a review of this book without giving away any spoliers. It's not one of her brilliant works. The story doesn't follow the usual pattern of her stories. In fact, the ending rather read like a test of Hastings' intelligence than a brilliant uncovering of crime that is the hallmark of what one expects from a Poirot story.
Somehow, she saved it from a three star but the four I have given are not very wholeheartedly given.
Fariba
This is the most intimate of the Hercule Poirot mysteries. Don't read it unless you're already quite familiar with Poirot. While I usually enjoy Christie's mysteries the characters are usually pretty flat. The characters in this mystery were more human. It also touches on some interesting ethical questions. Although this was a reread, I enjoyed it just as much as I did the first time I read it. Hercule Poirot is the greatest detective ever conceived.
Marianne Nichols
Loved It! I have always loved M. Poirot. His excellent mustache, his amazing "little grey cells". I thought I had read all of Dame What's books featuring the little Belgian detective. Then a couple of weeks ago, I came across Curtain. How apropos that Captain Hastings and M. Poirot should be together again at Styles. The place where it all began for them. Excellent book, and terrific exit for Hercule Poirot.
Amina Mirsakiyeva
With all my love to Christie, I feel sad and disappointed by the last novel about Poirot. No, this piece of art has all Christie's charm and logic. It is elegant and easy to follow. You find naive Arthur Hastings and brilliantly smart Hercule Poirot. You find so-called classical English murders, interesting psychological character of the murderer himself/herself (lets avoid spoilers). But the aftertaste I left with could not be more bitter!
Hilary
Unusual plot with more ethical questions than is normal in Poirot books, where the great quest for the truth is the only object the little grey cells are turning over. I understand that Agatha Christie wanted to round off the story of Poirot while she was sure she could, but so sad. Never wanted to imagine that Poirot wasn't trotting around solving mysteries for ever.
Emma
Now that's what I call an exit! It was delicious to be in the company of Poirot one last time. The plot is more circumvoluted than ever but it really works too.

And I kinda wish more writers had done what Agatha Christie did: write a final story for their star character way in advance and make sure nobody else could pick it up and keep writing new stories after their death.
Ron Southwell
a fitting conclusion to one of my favorite literary characters.
Sierra Dean
Not my fave Poirot, but an intriguing conclusion for the character. I'm really glad I got to read more Christie in 2017, her books show how much of an art it is to twist expectations.
Christy
Listened to this on Overdrive- Hugh Fraser was an amazing reader and it was a lot of fun.
Pramod
A fitting end to the Poirot Enterprise. My God, what a remarkable ending. It is slightly dry in between where all the facts get presented in hidden statement. Classic Poirot novel and his last.
Robyn
I LOVE CHRISTIE SO MUCH I THOUGHT I KNEW EVERYTHING BUT THEN THAT ENDING ... WOW WOW WOW. I CANT PUT THESE BOOKS DOWN.
Romaissa
Poirot's cases are my favourite of Christie's books, and sadly this is his last case. I enjoyed reading this book, though it took so long for a murder to happen. In the meantime, I tried to analyze each part i read, so i can guess what's coming, and i fell to the trick as always when reading for Christie. I thought i had it all figured out, before finishing the book, but when i got to the last chapter, i was amazed of the plot twist. I couldn't see it at all! This is why i love Christie's books Poirot's cases are my favourite of Christie's books, and sadly this is his last case. I enjoyed reading this book, though it took so long for a murder to happen. In the meantime, I tried to analyze each part i read, so i can guess what's coming, and i fell to the trick as always when reading for Christie. I thought i had it all figured out, before finishing the book, but when i got to the last chapter, i was amazed of the plot twist. I couldn't see it at all! This is why i love Christie's books and admire her as an author. The book also creates a kind of affection, especially for those who read a lot for Agatha Christie, because something happens to Poirot and the book reflects another side of him. The story also conveys an undeniable truth about human beings that is we all have the desire to murder and that desire is real. What makes a difference between a murderer and someone who's not is the willingness to kill. Personally, I haven't read much of Poirot's cases so far, but i can see this as a suitable ending.
Britain
I have a chaos of thoughts and I hope I’ll be able to express them all clearly.
First of all this book has kept my company and helped me get through all my OBGYN finals, thank you dear book!
I was reading poirot’s books in order and wasn’t planning to read curtain -his final case- now or any soon tbh, this happened by chance, but now I’m so glad I did this because I can’t even imagine how heartbroken I’d have been if I read about his death and then had no more poirot books to read, now I can prete I have a chaos of thoughts and I hope I’ll be able to express them all clearly.
First of all this book has kept my company and helped me get through all my OBGYN finals, thank you dear book!
I was reading poirot’s books in order and wasn’t planning to read curtain -his final case- now or any soon tbh, this happened by chance, but now I’m so glad I did this because I can’t even imagine how heartbroken I’d have been if I read about his death and then had no more poirot books to read, now I can pretend he came back from the dead just like Holmes O:)
I’m a huge Christie fan, and I just love how she manages to get me thinking about life and death and murder and justice and law and many times I just feel, damn! You’re so right, but I couldn’t agree a lot with poirot tbh. The whole idea of X I’m kind of uncertain what to feel and how to think about it, guess I need to read more into psychology anyway.
Overall the book just gave me a really good time, it felt so nostalgic being back at styles and I could feel the difference.
Poirot’s books were the first to get me into reading and they’ve kept my company ever since I was 11 and I’m glad I still have some more to read :D
Gloria
Poirot and Hastings return to the scene of their first adventure: Styles. Time has passed, they are older and Poirot has major health problems; Hastings' wife has died and his children are grown up. Judith, one of his children, is also at Styles helping Dr. Franklin.

Poirot indicates to Hastings that there is a murderer in their midst: X. Hastings tries his best to figure out who this mysterious person is. He does not realize who killed whom until Poirot's post-mortem letter, four months after h Poirot and Hastings return to the scene of their first adventure: Styles. Time has passed, they are older and Poirot has major health problems; Hastings' wife has died and his children are grown up. Judith, one of his children, is also at Styles helping Dr. Franklin.

Poirot indicates to Hastings that there is a murderer in their midst: X. Hastings tries his best to figure out who this mysterious person is. He does not realize who killed whom until Poirot's post-mortem letter, four months after his death.
Poirot is dead, Norton is dead, and Mrs. Franklin is dead.

Who killed whom? (view spoiler)[ Technically, Hastings killed Mrs. Franklin. She had taken some elixir that her husband was experimenting with and tried to poison him - kill him. Hastings had inadvertently moved the cups so that Mrs. Franklin took the dosed one, and Dr. Franklin the safe one. (hide spoiler)]

(view spoiler)[ Norton was a sadistic person who learned people's mental weak points and used them to leverage a murder. He tried with the host/hostess, the Franklins, and even with Hastings as his daughter seemed to pursue a man that Hastings did not like. The attempt with the host/hostess missed; Poirot and others prevented Mrs. Franklin's death from being labeled a murder; and Poirot prevented Hastings from following through with the murder of Judith's love interest. (hide spoiler)]

(view spoiler)[ Poirot. He killed Norton. He gave both of them sleeping tablets, and hid Norton. He then arranged the body and shot him. He explained this all in his letter, including the significance of the small things that Hastings should have picked up on. (hide spoiler)]
Unnati Singh
As usual, Agatha Christie blew me away with her ever so complex mysteries, however it is marked as merely a 3 star by me because well, its a downer. Poirot is my favorite Agatha Christie sleuth, smart, so pompous but still gentlemen-like, and seeing him die, was just brutal to me. It hit me hard. When I read "Poirot's Last Case", I was expecting him to perhaps retire, but death, did not, at that time seem like even an alternative to me, regardless of his situation with the crippling arthritis.

I As usual, Agatha Christie blew me away with her ever so complex mysteries, however it is marked as merely a 3 star by me because well, its a downer. Poirot is my favorite Agatha Christie sleuth, smart, so pompous but still gentlemen-like, and seeing him die, was just brutal to me. It hit me hard. When I read "Poirot's Last Case", I was expecting him to perhaps retire, but death, did not, at that time seem like even an alternative to me, regardless of his situation with the crippling arthritis.

In the book lies dark, deep, hidden meanings beneath its 'curtain' of narration; passionless marriages, breathtaking betrayals and grief covering only some of the depressing ground of them. The clues to unveil the mystery are unavailable to the readers until, alas, the extraordinary mind of the little man with the mustache uncovers it all, which is also quite the bummer for readers such as me.

I do admit that Hercule Poirot's final book, completely based on psychological suggestion and the 'perfect' crime, could have had a more grueling or challenging rival, for to end his books, his battles, in such a way is simply unfair to the enthusiasts of his books.

I thought the characters were a bit stilted and oversimplified in this one, but truly, intriguing story, to redeem its 3 stars. Overall, very satisfying and recommended to most readers. Not habitual, but quite unusual twist, rather way of composing the whole book, for Agatha Christie.
✿ Deni
I was a bit apprehensive about reading this book because I knew that Poirot died in it and I wasn't sure if I was ready to let him go. It turns out I shouldn't have worried. Yes, he dies, but in the story if feels like a thing of no importance, he just dies, suddenly but expected. And the fact that he is the one, as it couldn't be any other way, who lets us know how the crimes were made and solved, makes it feel even more that he is still there. So no, I wasn't left with an empty feeling after r I was a bit apprehensive about reading this book because I knew that Poirot died in it and I wasn't sure if I was ready to let him go. It turns out I shouldn't have worried. Yes, he dies, but in the story if feels like a thing of no importance, he just dies, suddenly but expected. And the fact that he is the one, as it couldn't be any other way, who lets us know how the crimes were made and solved, makes it feel even more that he is still there. So no, I wasn't left with an empty feeling after reading Poirot's death which, in a way, it was a bit disappointing.

I also was surprised at Poirot himself committing a crime, after all, he had always said that he didn't agree on one human being taking the life from another under any circumstances and he devoted his whole life to fight against it. I guess this can be explained by the fact that he knew that he was dying and he wanted to help as many people as possible before he went. In reality, I believe this was due to the fact that Agatha Christie was so fed up with Poirot (after all, she wrote this book years before it was actually published because she couldn't stand Poirot's fame any more) that she wanted him to go in a way that he wouldn't have liked, thus committing a crime.

All in all, I didn't enjoy this book as much as my expectations of a grand Poirot's finale had me hoping.
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