Archy and Mehitabel

Written by: Don Marquis

Archy and Mehitabel Book Cover
The now classic tale of Archy the cockroach and Mehitabel the cat in her ninth life. First published in 1927, this free verse poem has become an essential part of American literature.
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Archy and Mehitabel Reviews

Rob
A very enjoyable collection of "bite-sized" poems that is a good "pick up once in a while" book. I was first exposed to archy and mehitabel in high school but I found that the poems have much more resonance with the passing of years. The poems are written by "archy", a free verse poet in a past life who has been reincarnated as a philosophical cockroach. He writes by diving headfirst onto a typerwiter -- rendering capital letters and punctuation moot. He observes life around him, and also tells A very enjoyable collection of "bite-sized" poems that is a good "pick up once in a while" book. I was first exposed to archy and mehitabel in high school but I found that the poems have much more resonance with the passing of years. The poems are written by "archy", a free verse poet in a past life who has been reincarnated as a philosophical cockroach. He writes by diving headfirst onto a typerwiter -- rendering capital letters and punctuation moot. He observes life around him, and also tells tales of his friend mehitabel, a cat who claims to have been Cleopatra. archy's unique writing style will require your complete concentration and the occasional reread; but this is part of the fun as you come to appreciate his wry view of the world. This is offset by the somewhat tragic figure of mehitabel, who strives to be "always gay" despite her fall from the days of Cleopatra.

Suellen

The stories of Archy the cockroach and Mehitabel the cat first appeared in the 1916 newspaper column.

Archy the cockroach is a free verse poet. Mehitabel the cat claims that she has a human soul and has trans-migrated from body to body. She claims to have been Cleopatra at one point.

Each evening the author loads a fresh piece of paper in his typewriter before he goes home for the evening. He returns in the morning to find that Archy has furiously typed out his poetry and stories during the previ
The stories of Archy the cockroach and Mehitabel the cat first appeared in the 1916 newspaper column.

Archy the cockroach is a free verse poet. Mehitabel the cat claims that she has a human soul and has trans-migrated from body to body. She claims to have been Cleopatra at one point.

Each evening the author loads a fresh piece of paper in his typewriter before he goes home for the evening. He returns in the morning to find that Archy has furiously typed out his poetry and stories during the previous night.

This is such an unusual premise for a story but I couldn't help but give it more stars than what the content probably called for. Try as I might, I couldn't help but find myself lovingly in the minds of these creatures.

Shoshana
archy and mehitabel! I don't even know what to say about archy and mehitabel. I mean, what do you say about a book of poetry narrated by a cockroach who was a free verse poet in a past life? This book is from the 1920s but it reads absolutely contemporary. It is way too much fun to read aloud, it is super weird, it is philosophical, and it features a cat named Mehitabel who was Cleopatra in a former life and is now "toujours gay" despite hanging out with all manner of riffraff. If this sounds in archy and mehitabel! I don't even know what to say about archy and mehitabel. I mean, what do you say about a book of poetry narrated by a cockroach who was a free verse poet in a past life? This book is from the 1920s but it reads absolutely contemporary. It is way too much fun to read aloud, it is super weird, it is philosophical, and it features a cat named Mehitabel who was Cleopatra in a former life and is now "toujours gay" despite hanging out with all manner of riffraff. If this sounds in any way up your alley, I beg you to give it a go. If it sounds too freaking weird and awkward and you are not into poetry read-alouds with no punctuation, do not pick it up.

Myself, I wish I owned a copy to reference always.
Welcome to the Ice House :: The Barefoot Book of Ballet Stories :: Nothing Like the Sun :: Tremor of Intent :: The Fact of a Doorframe: Poems Selected and New, 1950-1984
Bev
Already wrote my review but it was lost somehow.

I read this book of free-verse poems many years ago, and was happy to find the book again. Published in the 1920s and 30s, these pieces are supposedly written by a cockroach (reincarnated poet) for his newspaper writer-friend Don Marquis. He works at night, diving head-first onto the typewriter keys to spell out his philosophical musing and pithy observations of the world around him, as seen from below. Of course, he is unable to use a shift key s Already wrote my review but it was lost somehow.

I read this book of free-verse poems many years ago, and was happy to find the book again. Published in the 1920s and 30s, these pieces are supposedly written by a cockroach (reincarnated poet) for his newspaper writer-friend Don Marquis. He works at night, diving head-first onto the typewriter keys to spell out his philosophical musing and pithy observations of the world around him, as seen from below. Of course, he is unable to use a shift key so the poems lack punctuation or capitals, but this is a clever ruse to create the free-verse form. The foreword by E.B. White is articulate and amazing. A collection of witty, thought-provoking gems.
Jo Blakely
This is my go-to, make me laugh, 'happy' book. Though Marquis is very political and misanthropic, these stories do expose his great heart though his wonderful characters particularly Archy (the bard) who has the soul of a poet reincarnated into a cockroach and Mehitabel the cat who was once Cleopatra and has seen better days. It is their resilience and humor that keeps them going and their commitment to their 'art'. Told in free verse (no punctuation or capitals) as Archy cannot hit the shift ke This is my go-to, make me laugh, 'happy' book. Though Marquis is very political and misanthropic, these stories do expose his great heart though his wonderful characters particularly Archy (the bard) who has the soul of a poet reincarnated into a cockroach and Mehitabel the cat who was once Cleopatra and has seen better days. It is their resilience and humor that keeps them going and their commitment to their 'art'. Told in free verse (no punctuation or capitals) as Archy cannot hit the shift key and type the letters at the same time. It takes getting used to at first - but you can't help but fall in love with these very pointed poems.
tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE
Verse & cartoons about a cockroach named "archy" who's a reincarnation of a free-verse poet & "mehitabel", a cat who's a reincarnation of Cleopatra. It's typed in lower-case b/c the cockroach isn't strong enuf to make the upper-case letters. I reckon this is an off-hand tribute to e e cummings but maybe not since cummings wd've been around 20 when this 1st appeared in the papers in 1916. Maybe cummings was influenced by marquis?

Anyway, when I 1st ran across this I probably thought that Verse & cartoons about a cockroach named "archy" who's a reincarnation of a free-verse poet & "mehitabel", a cat who's a reincarnation of Cleopatra. It's typed in lower-case b/c the cockroach isn't strong enuf to make the upper-case letters. I reckon this is an off-hand tribute to e e cummings but maybe not since cummings wd've been around 20 when this 1st appeared in the papers in 1916. Maybe cummings was influenced by marquis?

Anyway, when I 1st ran across this I probably thought that it had a strong premise & that's why I read it. However, I don't remember being ultimately that impressed by it. Hollywood shd do a remake w/ special effects & lots of inter-species sex.
Tristan
It was okay. The poetry wasn't great, wasn't terrible, was mostly just absolutely unremarkable as poetry. The premise was fun, and it justified the lack of capital letters and punctuation. Some sections were very funny; the best was probably "ghosts", which opens: "you want to know
whether I believe in ghosts
of course I do not believe in them
if you had known
as many of them as i have
you would not
believe in them either"
Overall, decent, but nothing to write home about.
Jane Stabb
If you have never come across this book, I highly recommend it. It's a collection of poems written by a cockroach called Archy, about him and his best friend Mehitabel the cat. In a previous life, Archy was a free verse poet, and now records details of his life on a typewriter by jumping onto the keys one by one.

It's really cool. My favourite poem is about when a tarantula came to the house, up from South America in a bunch of bananas. This poem is so funny that it makes me cry with laughter eve If you have never come across this book, I highly recommend it. It's a collection of poems written by a cockroach called Archy, about him and his best friend Mehitabel the cat. In a previous life, Archy was a free verse poet, and now records details of his life on a typewriter by jumping onto the keys one by one.

It's really cool. My favourite poem is about when a tarantula came to the house, up from South America in a bunch of bananas. This poem is so funny that it makes me cry with laughter every time I read it.

Thanks Liesl and Kirsty for giving me this book!
Kristianne
A thoroughly original, iconoclastic book. It gathers witty, cynical philosophical reflections in vers libre by Archy, a cockroach with a transmogrified poet's soul and a typewriter at his disposal. He often writes about the misadventures of Mehitabel, who was perhaps once Cleopatra and now an alley cat, but ever the amoral, pleasure-seeking lady. Archy asks why we cry over the creatures deemed beautiful, like butterflies and orioles, while we dispatch ugly hens and cockroaches without a twinge o A thoroughly original, iconoclastic book. It gathers witty, cynical philosophical reflections in vers libre by Archy, a cockroach with a transmogrified poet's soul and a typewriter at his disposal. He often writes about the misadventures of Mehitabel, who was perhaps once Cleopatra and now an alley cat, but ever the amoral, pleasure-seeking lady. Archy asks why we cry over the creatures deemed beautiful, like butterflies and orioles, while we dispatch ugly hens and cockroaches without a twinge of regret. He calls for an insect revolt that would make quite the horror film.
Lynn Pribus
i had no idea this book was this old. it was written in 1927. archy is a cockroach who must communicate by climbing to the top of a typewriter and leaping onto the keys so of course he cannot capitalize anything. mehitabel is a raunchy old cat whose catch phrase is "there's some dance in the old dame yet wotthehell wotthehell!"

very amusing. had forgotten about it until it was mentioned in A CERTAIN BELIEF IN ANGELS which i am listening to these days.

p.s. i leapt onto the caps lock key for the t i had no idea this book was this old. it was written in 1927. archy is a cockroach who must communicate by climbing to the top of a typewriter and leaping onto the keys so of course he cannot capitalize anything. mehitabel is a raunchy old cat whose catch phrase is "there's some dance in the old dame yet wotthehell wotthehell!"

very amusing. had forgotten about it until it was mentioned in A CERTAIN BELIEF IN ANGELS which i am listening to these days.

p.s. i leapt onto the caps lock key for the title above. wotthehell
Rebecca
I am now the proud owner of a 1932 hardback copy of this book, the cover of which is not displayed on Goodreads--boo hoo--because it's gorgeous, as is this book. I have not finished reading it yet and now that I own it, that's okay; I'm going to take as darned much time as I want, savoring this hilarity.

There are some books that make you (aka me) feel a whole lot better about our species. That one of its members could write this makes me think there is hope.
Rachel
Enjoyable until the end. This book, full of free verse poetry, captivates the reader. I love how some of the 'chapters' are short and breezy where others are a lot deeper than they may appear. The story is a refreshing concept and entertaining. The only negative part would be that without the punctuation sometimes I would read the line breaks wrong and have to read it a second time. However, I wouldn't let that stop you from picking up this book.
Tom Hammer
Written in 1916, this is an American classic, a piece of literature of great humor. One must wonder what columnist Don Marquis was drinking (or smoking?) when he wrote a story about a cockroach, free verse poet who writes by jumping on the keys of a typewriter, and his friend Mehitabel the cat. It sounds so treacly sweet that you dare not pick it up, but its one of the lasting pieces of literature I've ever read. Pick it up and read five pages and see if you aren't ready to give it a go...
Rachael Briggs
An old favorite that I recently reread, and found that I still love. Archy is a vers libre poet who has been reincarnated as a cockroach; his friend Mehitabel is a cat who claims to have once been Cleopatra. Mostly free verse, but breaks into some delightful metered bits, including two very catchy ballades with double refrains. Manages to make political and philosophical points, from the perspective of a cockroach, without being cloying. Great for reading out loud.
Kaethe
A friend at work suggested this as one of her favorite books in the world. I didn't hate it, but I wasn't particularly amused or charmed, either. I thought the gimmick got old quickly. I suppose there are people who look at The Complete Calvin and Hobbes and tire of the kid thinking the tiger is real, too.
Jane Baskin
I have a copy of this book from 1933 that I have treasured since my teens. It is not only one of the most inventive stories ever told (written by a cockroach jumping from key to key on a typewriter - who needs punctuation?) it is also a deeply insightful look at people and the times. Poverty, prohibition, women and friendship are only some of the themes woven so invisibly throughout a very funny yarn. One of my all time favorites.
Cait
I love these poems, but I'm dropping this particular printing of it down a star solely on technical issues: either the master was poor done or the ink and/or the paper was bad, because the type is extremely blotchy and as difficult to read as a cheap school ditto handout (at least it's not in purple, although it's no good to sniff). I'll try and find more copies of this edition to see if I just got a bad one or if they all suffer like this....
Rae
archy was once a great poet. he has been reincarnated as a cockroach but still has the soul of that poet. he types his poems on a rusty typewriter at night, accompanied by his friend mehitabel, an alley cat whose spirit houses the incarnated queen cleopatra. because he is unable to reach the shift key, his writing contains no caps or puncuation. i loved this book.
Dan
Jumping on the keys of a typewriter, a cockroach is able to write poems about himself and his friend Mehitabel (a cat). Arguably a precursor of Beat poetry. The consistent employment of the lowercase anticipates E.E. Cummings. Dominant themes include Egyptian mummies and Pythagoras’s theory of transmigration.
Karen
Every once in a while, this book comes back to me. I go through long periods of forgetting it; then--bang!--it's back. And it is worth remembering! I was captivated by poor, wild Mehitabel. And I loved Archy's observant poetry.

Thank God for English teachers! One of their noble number recommended this book to me in high school.
R
I ordered this book specifically because of how often I had seen it quoted in all of the different Best Quotes books out there. It's fun. Very much timeless. I remember my parents' old typewriter, so the premise of the story fits my memories very well. I highly recommend this book. It does not disappoint.
thewanderingjew
This little commentary on the issues of the world could have been written today. It was hard for me to believe that the little anecdotes were written 80 years ago.
It is a wonderfully clever and humorous presentation of life's dilemmas using a cockroach and a cat as the main characters in an amazingly creative way. I loved it.
Joel Van Valin
Archie, a cockroach who was a poet in a past life, jumps on typewriter keys to compose droll & modern poems about himself, his friend Mehitabel the cat, and occasional other rats, toads, and insects they run across. Written beginning in 1909, Marquis' work still seems modern, witty, and (in Mehitabel's words) tojours gai! Something fresh and very different that even non-poetry lovers will enjoy.
Emmaline
Um, can we talk about how amazing and underrated this book is?

"mehitabel is a believer
in the pythagorean
theory of the transmigration
of the soul and she claims
that formerly her spirit
was incarnated in the body
of cleopatra
that was a long time ago
and one must not be
surprised if mehitabel
has forgotten some of her
more regal manners"
Clare
A sort of free verse cross between e.e cummings and Molesworth, the incontinently garrulous Archy (a cockroach) sets out his and Mehitabel, the cat's, life stories. Skittering, syncopated and containing such chapter gems as "mehitabel was once cleopatra" and "the merry flea", well worth a read in the bath.

Ulysses
As someone who generally avoids poetry like the plague, I'm not qualified to comment on the poetic merits of this. But considered merely as a series of interesting philosophical questions presented in an entertainingly nontraditional format, it's pretty damn good.
Jane
it irritates me to pass shinbone alley where archie lived
and see a sign that says "private mews"
what the hell is a mews anyway
isn't it an apartment building for fancy birds
it sure as hell isn't an alley in new york
Bethany
at times sad, violent and profound, and at other times amusing and light hearted. if you like persona poems you will find this interesting. a lot of fun to read and the non capitalization underestimates the lines' serious manner sometimes.
Emmylou
I read my Dad's copy of this book in fifth grade and was chastised by my teacher because it is written with no punctuation- for it is the story of a cat, written by a flea, so he can't use punctuation you see. Really it is more like ee cummings poetry.
Lesley Arrowsmith
These are fun - I particularly liked the poem about the Egyptian mummy who was brought to New York to be exhibited at the museum. He woke from his aeon-long sleep craving beer, only to find he was in the middle of the Prohibition Era.
K
I learned about reincarnation. I learned about minimal punctuation and its use in fiction. I learned why never to write free-verse poetry.

This is a longstanding favorite of mine, ever since I first read it back in Jr. High.

toujours gai toujours gai..theres life in the old girl yet.
Dolly
A good friend recommended this book to me. Although I am not a huge fan of poetry, this very endearing book has made me enjoy poetry a bit more than before. Cute premise and a quick read. The edition of this book that I had the opportunity to read had very nice artwork in it as well.
Mercedes
A great little read that a friend turned me on to recently. Archy is a free-verse poet reincarnated into a cockroach and Mehitabel is a alley cat whose soul once inhabited Cleopatra's body. It is much more clever than it sounds.
Beth Willstrop
Great book! Fun for short bits of wisdom at whimsical random moments. My best friend gave it to me in 1973. I loaned it to Frankie in 2000something. I then lost my copy. Frankie, being the sweet angel he his, bought me a copy a year ago so I am no longer without.
Billy
Charming poems from Archy, a free verse poet from a previous life now trapped in the body of a cockroach. Some of the poems are truly hilarious as when Archy interviews the mummy of a pharaoh. Others are deeply philosophical. A few are just forgettable. Truly worth the time to read.
Donopolis
I read this book many years ago and must recommend it now to one and all... The free verse poetry written by Archy ( a cockroach) is great social commentary. Written in 1916 many of the truths revealed stay true to this day.

Don
Rob
I liked it and I bought it and I am not sure why. It is just some free verse poetry written by a poet who died and came back a cockroach. There are illustrations of Archy and his cat friend Mehitabel. I have never seen anything quite like it.
Kristy Madden
I liked this book with it's imaginative characters and comedic verses and I especially love the accompanying comics. Some of the poems are just bizarre and some have deeper meaning. It's a little slice of history from the Prohibition Era.
Christine559
Here's another treasure that I discovered during my freshman year of high school. I recommend this book, and all of the subsequent A&M books.
There is humor, philosophy, and peeks into the lost world of the early 20th century.
I could not love a cockroach and an alley cat any more than this.
Echo
I discovered "the lesson of the moth" in high school and loved it, so I decided to read more of Marquis. I enjoyed it pretty well. Some of the poems I didn't like at all, but others really amused me.
Alyson Whatcott
Funny and witty, a cockroach, Archy, was a poet in a former life. He learns how to use the typewriter but cannot reach the shift key or punctuation, so the entire story is told through small letters in free verse. He writes clever entries every day on the typewriter.
Ha Li
Absolutely entertaining. I love the style, the words twisted into discourse, and the characters themselves. I wish there was more!

The version I have is 1927 doubleday & company. I'd like to read more of Don Marquis's works.
Gretchen
I'm not sure about the date--but I have laughed and laughed for many years enjoying the poems in this book--a cockroach and an alley cat--that's funny in itself.
Judah
My friend Mike B. showed me a poem from this book soon after we met. It made me love him. It's called "The Lesson of the Moth."
Read_instead
Very enjoyable read. I heard of archy and mehitabel while reading Christopher Morley. It is wonderful when one great books leads you to another.
Eric Buhrer
This timeless free-verse poetry was written by a cockroach who numbers among his acquaintances the transmigrated souls of Shakespeare and Cleopatra.
Stacey
Life through the eyes of a cockroach! Genius!
Beth
What a book! Read it when I was in the 4th grade and will never forget the cat and the cockroach characters.
Emily
Full of nonsense which is also wisdom. Toujours gai!
Emma
This is an absolutely brilliant book of poetry written by a cockroach named archy
Annaleely Leely
i have aarti rana's book. m. sent me one as well.
Mae
One of those books, no one has ever read; but I quote all the time. I have read it 20 times, and I never tire of it. I lost my copy, but have been searching for it for a while.
Doug
My mom had this book. I read it over and over.
Beth
So very fond of this book. Wotthehell. Of course it drags in spots, but it never fails to make me happy.
Kristin
An appreciation for the way things used to be. True love between a cat and a cockroach.
David R.
Perhaps the greatest , funniest, most heart-warming bit of cockroach and alley cat philosophy written in the 20th century. WOTTHEHELL WOTTHEHELL, toujours gai!
Nicole
I have a very old copy of this book that I love to read over and over. It gets better with each read.
Betsey
I had to read this for my first college english. The teachers theme was cockroaches. Anyway it is a very fun book and it is one I would read again.
Emma_Rose
my nan recommended this book to me. i thought it was funny.
Meave
I'm generally a poetry philistine but this was pretty tremendous.
Jacquie
A fun and unusual little anthology that offers insight into the days when newspapers were less utilitarian in construct.

"Archy and Mehitabel" is the creation of Don Marquis, a columnist for the New York Tribune, who writes from the perspective of Archy, a free-verse poet reincarnated as a cockroach. At nights, Archy crawls onto a typewriter and slowly crafts his poetry by slamming his body onto the keys, one letter at a time. He laments his sullen existence, comments on the daily minutiae of th A fun and unusual little anthology that offers insight into the days when newspapers were less utilitarian in construct.

"Archy and Mehitabel" is the creation of Don Marquis, a columnist for the New York Tribune, who writes from the perspective of Archy, a free-verse poet reincarnated as a cockroach. At nights, Archy crawls onto a typewriter and slowly crafts his poetry by slamming his body onto the keys, one letter at a time. He laments his sullen existence, comments on the daily minutiae of the humans towering above him, and recounts his conversations with Mehitabel, a street cat who claims to be Cleopatra in a past life.

The mythos is wholly unique, and Marquis commits to his canon, never once letting on that his column could be anything but the musings of a verbose roach, and you can tell he loves the small cast of characters he has created. And to think that pieces like this were the product of a newspaper is hard to grasp in our current time, where newspapers increasingly struggle to find relevance in our technological landscape. I'd love to see a paper take some artistic risks like this today.

The poems themselves can be hit-and-miss. The longer pieces, often involving rants from the "toujours gai" Mehitabel, are tedious and repetitive. It's the shorter works that are truly golden, the pieces that focus on archy's oddly-prescient social criticisms. "Aesop Revised by Archy" is worth the price of admission alone (Google it, if you have the chance).

Pick this up for a brief look into a century-old America facing eerily similar concerns to our own, and a columnist's earnest efforts at understanding it through his humble world-building.
Jenny Yates
I read this when I was a kid, because it was a favorite of my mother’s. It’s funny, sometimes meandering, sometimes profound.

The premise is that it was written by a cockroach named archy. The author left a blank sheet in the typewriter every night, and archy took this opportunity to jump onto it and laboriously bang away about his life and thoughts. Archy couldn’t manage capital letters or punctuation marks, so he has a distinct and very modern style.

Archy tells us that he wasn’t always a cock I read this when I was a kid, because it was a favorite of my mother’s. It’s funny, sometimes meandering, sometimes profound.

The premise is that it was written by a cockroach named archy. The author left a blank sheet in the typewriter every night, and archy took this opportunity to jump onto it and laboriously bang away about his life and thoughts. Archy couldn’t manage capital letters or punctuation marks, so he has a distinct and very modern style.

Archy tells us that he wasn’t always a cockroach, and that his current shape is punishment for having been a free verse poet. He also transcribes the songs and sayings of mehitabel, the cat, who is a reincarnation of Cleopatra. Mehitabel is an alleycat with great pretensions, and she says, “To hell with anything unrefined has always been my motto.”

In one chapter, archy describes the balance of power between species. He describes how the angleworm speaks, after it is eaten by a robin, about how it has lost its individuality and become part of the bird. The bird, meanwhile, sings its own song of well-being until it’s eaten by the cat. Archy concludes “how beautiful is the universe when something digestible meets with an eager digestion, when atom rushes to the arms of waiting atom and they dance together skimming with fairy feet along a tide of gastric juices.” (I added the comma; there are no commas in this book.)

Marvera Murphy
I LOVE this book! I first read it while living in San Francisco in the 60's. My personal mantra "there's still a dance in the old dame yet; toujours gai toujours gai" comes from "mehitabels song". I reread sections of this book every year! The writings of a free verse poet reincarnated as a cockroach, Archy who would climb up on to an old typewriter and hurl himself at the keys, typing out stories of the daily challenges of a cockroach's life, is a satire on modern life. Mehitabel, in a former l I LOVE this book! I first read it while living in San Francisco in the 60's. My personal mantra "there's still a dance in the old dame yet; toujours gai toujours gai" comes from "mehitabels song". I reread sections of this book every year! The writings of a free verse poet reincarnated as a cockroach, Archy who would climb up on to an old typewriter and hurl himself at the keys, typing out stories of the daily challenges of a cockroach's life, is a satire on modern life. Mehitabel, in a former life was Cleopatra, seems to espouse a buddhist philosophy. If shipwrecked on a deserted island, this would be one book I'd need to have!
Martin Ridgway
this is just a truly bizarre book on - sort of - reincarnation and ways of killing time and life in general and its just weird and wonderful
because its written by a cockroach on a typewriter there are no characters that require you to hit two keys at once, theres no uppercase and not much punctuation much
theres lots of very profound sad and funny stuff - sometimes all at once

ps the title of the book is lowercase archy and mehitabel not as it shows above
E. Mattson
An amazing little book. Inventive, pithy and thought provoking.
Joseph DeBrine
amazing amazing amazing. I don't even like poetry
Ellis Knox
I read this when I was a young 'un and have read it several times since. It gets better every time.
Cay Denise
Found the lack of punctuation affected the ease of reading the book.
Susan
This is a quirky little book-- My copy is so...old I have the original hand-written sales receipt from a great little second hand bookstore in West Chester, PA. The book jacket describes the reason why I was drawn to purchase this book in the first place:

"Don Marquis first introduced archy the cockroach and mehitabel, the cat in her ninth life, in his newspaper column, "The Sun Dial" in 1916. In a previous incarnation arch was a free-verse poet, while mehitabel's soul once belonged to Cleopatra. This is a quirky little book-- My copy is so...old I have the original hand-written sales receipt from a great little second hand bookstore in West Chester, PA. The book jacket describes the reason why I was drawn to purchase this book in the first place:

"Don Marquis first introduced archy the cockroach and mehitabel, the cat in her ninth life, in his newspaper column, "The Sun Dial" in 1916. In a previous incarnation arch was a free-verse poet, while mehitabel's soul once belonged to Cleopatra." So--- with THAT description... Enjoy. ;-)
Helen
i first read this gem in the late 70s - I think it was this edition - may have been an old hardcover. anyway, now recently reread. made me smile then - made me laugh now - only deeper.

book seems like it would be banal, insipid even - premise is peculiar
cockroaches and cats, moths, fleas and spiders - but no - it is delightful and a classic.
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