Baltasar and Blimunda

Written by: José Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero

Baltasar and Blimunda Book Cover
From the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Literature, a “brilliant...enchanting novel” (New York Times Book Review) of romance, deceit, religion, and magic set in eighteenth-century Portugal at the height of the Inquisition. National bestseller. Translated by Giovanni Pontiero.

When King and Church exercise absolute power what happens to the dreams of ordinary people? In early eighteenth century Lisbon, Baltasar, a soldier who has lost a hand in battle, falls in love with Blimunda, a young girl with strange visionary powers. From the day that he follows her home from the auto-da-fe where her mother is condemned and sent into exile, the two are bound body and soul by a love of unassailable strength. A third party shares their supper that evening: Padre Bartolemeu Lourenço, whose fantasy is to invent a flying machine. As the inquisition rages and royalty and religion clash, they pursue his impossible, not to mention heretical, dream of flight.
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 70
33
21
8
3
5
Looking for Baltasar and Blimunda in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

Baltasar and Blimunda Reviews

Joana
Bem, cá vamos nós.
Este foi o primeiro livro de Saramago que li e não será, certamente, o último. Apaixonei-me pela escrita deste tão conceituado autor, verdade seja dita. Como se costuma dizer: "primeiro estranha-se, depois entranha-se" e eu tive de adotar os meus métodos para que isso acontecesse. A minha própria mãe presenciou alguns momentos embaraçosos de leituras e releituras em voz alta de diálogos confusos... Mas sobrevivi e adorei a experiência.

Começamos pelo Baltasar e pela Blimunda? A Bem, cá vamos nós.
Este foi o primeiro livro de Saramago que li e não será, certamente, o último. Apaixonei-me pela escrita deste tão conceituado autor, verdade seja dita. Como se costuma dizer: "primeiro estranha-se, depois entranha-se" e eu tive de adotar os meus métodos para que isso acontecesse. A minha própria mãe presenciou alguns momentos embaraçosos de leituras e releituras em voz alta de diálogos confusos... Mas sobrevivi e adorei a experiência.

Começamos pelo Baltasar e pela Blimunda? A mim, parece-me bem... Adorei a relação destes dois. Um amor ingénuo, puro e cativante que traz ao de cima o melhor dos corações humanos. Se sofri com o final? Oh meus caros, eu tenho um grave problema com personagens fictícias e quando já me tinha conformado com o desfecho da história, o narrador decide lançar a "bomba" nos dois últimos parágrafos. Não soltei nem uma, nem duas nem mesmo três lágrimas... foram aos pares como se elas tivessem sofrido e não se quisessem abandonar umas às outras num momento tão (...) emotivo.
Blimunda e Baltasar, Sete-Luas e Sete-Sóis ficarão para sempre guardados na minha memória.

Quanto ao aspecto crítico da obra... Adorei ler a partir da perspectiva deste narrador tão perspicaz e inteligente. O notório tom sarcástico e ironia propositada em algumas passagens textuais não me seguraram umas boas e agradáveis gargalhadas. A descrição não podia ser mais ousada e adequada ao contexto social da época e o mais interessante, a meu ver, foi sem dúvida o relevo dado aos que vivem na sombra deste Portugal entorpecido da primeira metade do século XVIII. Um povo que vive na penúria, que luta por um país cujo rei usa e abusa do poder lhe fora concedido para satisfazer o seu "pequenino" ego.

Uma grande vénia a este senhor... Muita pena tenho eu de só agora dar valor a este fantástico escritor português! Palmas!
Stephen
HEADLINE: Being John Malkovich . . . . Excuse me. . . .I mean, Being José Saramago.
As I mentioned once before, I have given up that tedious worry as to whether the book in translation that I am reading is a faithful translation of the original or not. The book in front of me in English is either a dandy or it is not. I no longer care whether it bears any resemblance to the original. I will let others tease that out.

Baltasar and Blimunda in English is one of those dandies. It is perfectly consist HEADLINE: Being John Malkovich . . . . Excuse me. . . .I mean, Being José Saramago.
As I mentioned once before, I have given up that tedious worry as to whether the book in translation that I am reading is a faithful translation of the original or not. The book in front of me in English is either a dandy or it is not. I no longer care whether it bears any resemblance to the original. I will let others tease that out.

Baltasar and Blimunda in English is one of those dandies. It is perfectly consistent with my other very limited background launching out into the experience of an Iberian writer or a Latin American writer. Marquez, Cortazar, Borges, Saramago, Eduardo Galeano from Uruguay, a very few others, and even Cervantes. It is always a “fasten your seatbelt” kind of experience. Now that I have overcome that hangup about reading in translation, I intend to broaden that experience.

Brooding in the background of this entire love story is the thought underlying Padre Bartolomeu Lourenço's comforting words to Baltasar when he explains to Baltasar that confession is not really necessary because God sees into the hearts of man and will even up the score at judgment day,

although it may also come to pass that everything will end with a general amnesty or universal punishment, all that remains to be known is who will pardon or punish God.

or this:

the royal party drove past looking solemn, grave, and imperious without so much as a smile, for God himself never smiles, and He must have His reasons, who knows, perhaps He has ended up feeling ashamed of this world He has created.

It takes a bit for one to get one's sea legs in this world. When one first encounters the concept of capturing human "wills" with which to power the flying machine, one is a initially a bit disoriented. But aside from the weighty message of that, one soon becomes used to the idea in a matter-of-fact way. This image, for lack of a better word, is one of those that permeates the whole novel.

There came the chapter for me well into the book devoted to the auto-da-fé. It starts with an explanation of why Doña Maria Ana will not be able to attend and a description of the sumptuous feast that the King and Chief Inquisitor will enjoy after the ritual slaughter (51 men and 53 women). There is a nice description of the nature of this festivity. Then Sete-Sóis and Blimunda meet for the first time as they watch her mystic mother take a flogging. Shortly thereafter, our friend Padre Bartolomeu marries them on the spot, and the chapter closes with Blimunda making the sign of the cross on Sete-Sóis' chest "near his heart" with her own blood after losing her virginity.

It was at that point that I muttered, “Okay. I am with you now. Bring it on.”

Imagery. That common, withered, English Major word is re-informed by this novel.

Interest in other aspects of the novel depends to some extent in whether one develops a fascination with the history of Iberia and Portugal in particular. João V's involvement in the War of Spanish Succession, his extravagant attempts to emulate the splendor of Louis XIV's court in France, and his fixation on proving himself the most Catholic of all Kings are things that will turn back a fair number of readers.

As one approaches the end of the book, one reads about the construction of Dom João V's huge convent. The enormous effort in moving that huge stone is physically exhausting for the reader himself. I found this the most vivid and entertaining part of the novel. The novel takes on the air of an epic in that section.

However, the portrayal of the royal procession is also a comic masterpiece. Ultimately, even the King finally realizes that death will render it all meaningless. He will not be alive when, and if, the convent is finally completed.

When all is said and done, we are left with this from earlier in the novel:

. . . there was no difference whatsoever between the ritual of those
lovers and the sacrifice of Holy Mass, and if there were, the Mass
would surely lose out.

What must it be like to inhabit José Saramago's brain? This novel is an exploration of it.

Besides the conversation of women, it is dreams that keep the world in orbit. But dreams also form a diadem of moons, therefore the sky is that splendor inside a man's head, if his head is not, in fact, his own unique sky.
Pollo
Creí que, con Ensayo sobre la ceguera, El evangelio según Jesucristo y Todos los nombres difícilmente mi ranking saramaguiano iba a cambiar (aunque me gustan mucho los 16 libros que le he leído, con excepción de La balsa de piedra y Caín). Memorial del convento me hace replantear mi ranking. Tiene uno de los finales más sorpresivos y tristes que he leído en una novela. Además creo que es la única que recuerdo del portugués donde se mezclan historias múltiples (y muy bien). En casi todas sus obra Creí que, con Ensayo sobre la ceguera, El evangelio según Jesucristo y Todos los nombres difícilmente mi ranking saramaguiano iba a cambiar (aunque me gustan mucho los 16 libros que le he leído, con excepción de La balsa de piedra y Caín). Memorial del convento me hace replantear mi ranking. Tiene uno de los finales más sorpresivos y tristes que he leído en una novela. Además creo que es la única que recuerdo del portugués donde se mezclan historias múltiples (y muy bien). En casi todas sus obras hay historias de amor y mucha poesía. Pero creo que la mejor historia de amor es esta. Es extraordinaria.
Haunted: Tales of the Grotesque :: Pay the Piper :: Touch Magic: Fantasy, Faerie & Folklore in the Literature of Childhood :: The Fact of a Doorframe: Poems Selected and New, 1950-1984 :: The Cave
Silvia
Esse livro foi meu primeiro contato com a obra de José Saramago. No começo estranhei a falta de pontos finais pra fechar as sentenças, entre outras normas da gramática portuguesa, mas isso é nada mais que forma e traço de um escritor cheio de estilo. A personagem Blimunda é pura poesia - come o pão pela manhã, mesmo antes de abrir os olhos, para não ver o que as pessoas carregam no íntimo mais verdadeiro; sai colhendo as vontades dos outros para alimentar uma passarola que subirá aos céus... Lin Esse livro foi meu primeiro contato com a obra de José Saramago. No começo estranhei a falta de pontos finais pra fechar as sentenças, entre outras normas da gramática portuguesa, mas isso é nada mais que forma e traço de um escritor cheio de estilo. A personagem Blimunda é pura poesia - come o pão pela manhã, mesmo antes de abrir os olhos, para não ver o que as pessoas carregam no íntimo mais verdadeiro; sai colhendo as vontades dos outros para alimentar uma passarola que subirá aos céus... Lindo de morrer.
Δx Δp ≥ ½ ħ
Oh. That. Ending. I cried like a little baby.

The most beautiful thing about Saramago's work is it captures all human (and humanity) emotions. The brilliant humour will make you get a pure joy and big laugh, the tragedy will give you the saddest moment of your life. And also, the end of the book will provoke you to tears and destroy you to the pieces.
Teresa
Adorei tudo neste livro, a maneira como está escrito, os personagens, a história... Aprendi imenso sobre história de Portugal, sobre a vida do povo em Portugal no século dezoito. Blimunda e Baltazar são dos personagens mais fascinantes que já encontrei num livro. É cru como o era a vida daquele tempo. O esplendor de uns, a miséria e abnegação de quase todos. E o fim... nem sei o que hei-de dizer... Fico por aqui... Leiam e julguem por vós próprios. Acredito que não seja do gosto de todos, mas de Adorei tudo neste livro, a maneira como está escrito, os personagens, a história... Aprendi imenso sobre história de Portugal, sobre a vida do povo em Portugal no século dezoito. Blimunda e Baltazar são dos personagens mais fascinantes que já encontrei num livro. É cru como o era a vida daquele tempo. O esplendor de uns, a miséria e abnegação de quase todos. E o fim... nem sei o que hei-de dizer... Fico por aqui... Leiam e julguem por vós próprios. Acredito que não seja do gosto de todos, mas de muitos certamente será.
Imperdoavelmente ainda não tinha lido nada de José Saramago, e agora, posso dizer, que compreendo perfeitamente porque ganhou o Prémio Nobel. Felizmente tenho muitas obras dele pela frente.
Mounir
(المراجعة باللغة العربية إلى أسفل)
Each novel by Jose Saramago is a masterpiece, including this historical tale from 18th century Portugal, with tells of two actual building projects: the story of the building of Mafra palace and convent(hence the original title: Memorial do Convento); the king's vanity and absolute power; the hundreds of men and women involved in this huge - and useless - project; the lives lost; the persons maimed; the families disrupted; all for a promise made by a king to the (المراجعة باللغة العربية إلى أسفل)
Each novel by Jose Saramago is a masterpiece, including this historical tale from 18th century Portugal, with tells of two actual building projects: the story of the building of Mafra palace and convent(hence the original title: Memorial do Convento); the king's vanity and absolute power; the hundreds of men and women involved in this huge - and useless - project; the lives lost; the persons maimed; the families disrupted; all for a promise made by a king to the Franciscan order. And don't forget the Inquisition.
On the other hand, there is the building of a Flying Machine, a primitive scientific attempt at flying, done only by three persons.
Saramago tells these stories in his usual distinctive style, here with elements from historical and mythical tales, mixing historical fact with fiction and with some magical or supernatural elements; and as usual with bitter sarcasm of the royal concern with glory and pomp, and of the tedious ceremonies of church people and friars, without forgetting to expose the religious hypocrisy of ordinary people.
And among all of all this, there is the tender love story; and there remains only the simple facts: tenderness, real emotions, human warmth, and love.
روايات جوزيه ساراماجو كلها تعتبر من روائع الأعمال، بما فيها هذه الرواية عن البرتغال في القرن الثامن عشر، التي يحكي فيها عن مشروعين حقيقيين للبناء: القصر الملكي والدير بمدينة مافرا (ومن هنا العنوان الأصلي للرواية: مذكرات الدير)، وغرور الملك واستبداده، ومئات الرجال والنساء الذين تأثرت حياتهم بهذا المشروع الضخم قليل الفائدة؛ أشخاص فقدوا حياتهم أو تشوهوا، عائلات تفككت، وكل ذلك من أجل تنفيذ ما وعده الملك للرهبان الفرنسيسكان. وبالإضافة إلى ذلك هناك محاكم التفتيش.
وفي مقابل ذلك، هناك قصة أخرى حقيقية عن محاولة بناء آلة تطير في الهواء، محاولة علمية بدائية قام بها ثلاث أشخاص فقط.
يحكي ساراماجو كل ذلك بأسلوبه المميز، مع إضافة عناصر أسلوبية من النصوص التاريخية والأسطورية، مازجا بين الحقيقة التاريخية والخيال، ومع بعض العناصر السحرية. وكعادته، هناك سخرية مرة من انشغال الملك وحاشيته بالمجد والمظاهر والأبهة، وسخرية من الطقوس الكنسية الثقيلة، ولا ينسى أن يسخر من النفاق والرياء الديني لجموع الناس.
ووسط كل ذلك، هناك قصة الحب الرقيقة، حيث لا يبقى في النهاية إلا الحقائق البسيطة: الحنان، والمشاعر الحقيقية، والدفء الإنساني، والحب
Cloudbuster
Romanzo storico in perfetto stile saramaghiano, in cui l’autore mescola sapientemente la Storia alta, con vicende della storia portoghese ricostruite con grande rigore e precisione, con la storia bassa inventandosi personaggi popolari di grande spessore ed umanità.

In questo caso la vicenda si svolge nel Portogallo dell’inizio del XVIII secolo. La storia prende spunto dalla costruzione del gigantesco monastero di Manfra, opera immensa che, nelle mire del re portoghese, doveva rivaleggiare con la Romanzo storico in perfetto stile saramaghiano, in cui l’autore mescola sapientemente la Storia alta, con vicende della storia portoghese ricostruite con grande rigore e precisione, con la storia bassa inventandosi personaggi popolari di grande spessore ed umanità.

In questo caso la vicenda si svolge nel Portogallo dell’inizio del XVIII secolo. La storia prende spunto dalla costruzione del gigantesco monastero di Manfra, opera immensa che, nelle mire del re portoghese, doveva rivaleggiare con la Basiliza di San Pietro, e che contribuì a dissanguare le casse del regno lusitano. A questa vicenda si intrecciano le vicende dinastiche e lo strapotere del Santo Ufficio e dei vari ordini religiosi, verso i quali l’autore è sempre molto caustico.

Su questo sfondo si innestano le vicende di un misterioso religioso, padre Bartolomeu Lourenço de Gusmão, che mescola scienza e misticismo nel progetto ambizioso di costruire un “uccellaccio”, precursore dei moderni aerei, e dei suoi valenti aiutanti, Baltasar e Blimunda, che sono i veri protagonisti della storia e saranno i custodi del sogno della macchina volante.

Pur essendo un estimatore di Saramago e del suo stile particolarissimo, ho trovato questo romanzo particolarmente complesso ed ho fatto una fatica immane per giungere alla fine.
Ana
3.75 estrelas

O Memorial do Convento foi o primeiro romance que li de José Saramago. Gostei bastante do facto de o narrador falar tanto na terceira pessoa do singular como na primeira, adotando, assim, a voz de várias personagens e comunicando por vezes com elas e dos diálogos entre Blimunda e Baltasar assim como a caracterização das duas personagens. Enfim, personagens únicas, diálogos únicos, uma história única...

Acabei por dar 3 estrelas ao livro porque não me identifico muito com as opiniõe 3.75 estrelas

O Memorial do Convento foi o primeiro romance que li de José Saramago. Gostei bastante do facto de o narrador falar tanto na terceira pessoa do singular como na primeira, adotando, assim, a voz de várias personagens e comunicando por vezes com elas e dos diálogos entre Blimunda e Baltasar assim como a caracterização das duas personagens. Enfim, personagens únicas, diálogos únicos, uma história única...

Acabei por dar 3 estrelas ao livro porque não me identifico muito com as opiniões e ideias do escritor e porque achei alguns capítulos mais interessantes do que outros.
Emile
Sarramago's writing, which foregoes the normal stylistic emphasis on the change from one character's voice to another (quotes and new paragraphs), allows us to view them all collectively rather than having the 'camera' zoom in on each speaker in turn. This communal effect brings the reader into immediate and intimate contact with the characters. This story, in particular, tells of such a compelling love that the magical realism of the characters appears to be the only way to do it justice. As al Sarramago's writing, which foregoes the normal stylistic emphasis on the change from one character's voice to another (quotes and new paragraphs), allows us to view them all collectively rather than having the 'camera' zoom in on each speaker in turn. This communal effect brings the reader into immediate and intimate contact with the characters. This story, in particular, tells of such a compelling love that the magical realism of the characters appears to be the only way to do it justice. As always, the commentary woven into the narrative is inescapable and sharp.
Amari
i don't know what happened, but this is one of the few books i've not been able to finish. although i revere saramago, i was not at all drawn in to this book. with a heavy heart, i put it down. i hope that i can read it someday and see what i missed the first time.
Ana
Quem sou eu para fazer uma review sobre a genialidade deste senhor? Lamento mas eu não consigo fazer reviews sobre Saramago.

Só posso dizer que quanto mais conheço da obra dele mais tenho a certeza que este homem não era de cá "do meio de nós".

Este livro é absolutamente delicioso. A forma como é escrito, o humor refinado, a história da construção de um dos monumentos mais marcantes da nossa história, uma das histórias de amor mais incríveis de sempre... e o final!!! Aquele final... é qualquer c Quem sou eu para fazer uma review sobre a genialidade deste senhor? Lamento mas eu não consigo fazer reviews sobre Saramago.

Só posso dizer que quanto mais conheço da obra dele mais tenho a certeza que este homem não era de cá "do meio de nós".

Este livro é absolutamente delicioso. A forma como é escrito, o humor refinado, a história da construção de um dos monumentos mais marcantes da nossa história, uma das histórias de amor mais incríveis de sempre... e o final!!! Aquele final... é qualquer coisa! ... é, sem dúvida, das melhores coisas que já li.

Agradeço à minha velha escola secundaria na terrinha por não ter escolhido esta obra como obrigatória a português no 12 ano, pois provavelmente aos 17 anos não teria tido o mesmo gozo que tive aos 30 a ler esta obra prima.
Răzvanul Mirică
Dacă trecutul ar fi un corp, prin acest roman, ar sta dezbrăcat în fața noastră. Iar Saramago ar încerca să-i dibuiască gândurile și emoțiile în cel mai profund mod.
Joana
Bem, cá vamos nós.
Este foi o primeiro livro de Saramago que li e não será, certamente, o último. Apaixonei-me pela escrita deste tão conceituado autor, verdade seja dita. Como se costuma dizer: "primeiro estranha-se, depois entranha-se" e eu tive de adotar os meus métodos para que isso acontecesse. A minha própria mãe presenciou alguns momentos embaraçosos de leituras e releituras em voz alta de diálogos confusos... Mas sobrevivi e adorei a experiência.

Começamos pelo Baltasar e pela Blimunda? A mim, parece-me bem... Adorei a relação destes dois. Um amor ingénuo, puro e cativante que traz ao de cima o melhor dos corações humanos. Se sofri com o final? Oh meus caros, eu tenho um grave problema com personagens fictícias e quando já me tinha conformado com o desfecho da história, o narrador decide lançar a "bomba" nos dois últimos parágrafos. Não soltei nem uma, nem duas nem mesmo três lágrimas... foram aos pares como se elas tivessem sofrido e não se quisessem abandonar umas às outras num momento tão (...) emotivo.
Blimunda e Baltasar, Sete-Luas e Sete-Sóis ficarão para sempre guardados na minha memória.

Quanto ao aspecto crítico da obra... Adorei ler a partir da perspectiva deste narrador tão perspicaz e inteligente. O notório tom sarcástico e ironia propositada em algumas passagens textuais não me seguraram umas boas e agradáveis gargalhadas. A descrição não podia ser mais ousada e adequada ao contexto social da época e o mais interessante, a meu ver, foi sem dúvida o relevo dado aos que vivem na sombra deste Portugal entorpecido da primeira metade do século XVIII. Um povo que vive na penúria, que luta por um país cujo rei usa e abusa do poder lhe fora concedido para satisfazer o seu "pequenino" ego.

Uma grande vénia a este senhor... Muita pena tenho eu de só agora dar valor a este fantástico escritor português! Palmas!
Stephen
HEADLINE: Being John Malkovich . . . . Excuse me. . . .I mean, Being José Saramago.
As I mentioned once before, I have given up that tedious worry as to whether the book in translation that I am reading is a faithful translation of the original or not. The book in front of me in English is either a dandy or it is not. I no longer care whether it bears any resemblance to the original. I will let others tease that out.

Baltasar and Blimunda in English is one of those dandies. It is perfectly consistent with my other very limited background launching out into the experience of an Iberian writer or a Latin American writer. Marquez, Cortazar, Borges, Saramago, Eduardo Galeano from Uruguay, a very few others, and even Cervantes. It is always a “fasten your seatbelt” kind of experience. Now that I have overcome that hangup about reading in translation, I intend to broaden that experience.

Brooding in the background of this entire love story is the thought underlying Padre Bartolomeu Lourenço's comforting words to Baltasar when he explains to Baltasar that confession is not really necessary because God sees into the hearts of man and will even up the score at judgment day,

although it may also come to pass that everything will end with a general amnesty or universal punishment, all that remains to be known is who will pardon or punish God.

or this:

the royal party drove past looking solemn, grave, and imperious without so much as a smile, for God himself never smiles, and He must have His reasons, who knows, perhaps He has ended up feeling ashamed of this world He has created.

It takes a bit for one to get one's sea legs in this world. When one first encounters the concept of capturing human "wills" with which to power the flying machine, one is a initially a bit disoriented. But aside from the weighty message of that, one soon becomes used to the idea in a matter-of-fact way. This image, for lack of a better word, is one of those that permeates the whole novel.

There came the chapter for me well into the book devoted to the auto-da-fé. It starts with an explanation of why Doña Maria Ana will not be able to attend and a description of the sumptuous feast that the King and Chief Inquisitor will enjoy after the ritual slaughter (51 men and 53 women). There is a nice description of the nature of this festivity. Then Sete-Sóis and Blimunda meet for the first time as they watch her mystic mother take a flogging. Shortly thereafter, our friend Padre Bartolomeu marries them on the spot, and the chapter closes with Blimunda making the sign of the cross on Sete-Sóis' chest "near his heart" with her own blood after losing her virginity.

It was at that point that I muttered, “Okay. I am with you now. Bring it on.”

Imagery. That common, withered, English Major word is re-informed by this novel.

Interest in other aspects of the novel depends to some extent in whether one develops a fascination with the history of Iberia and Portugal in particular. João V's involvement in the War of Spanish Succession, his extravagant attempts to emulate the splendor of Louis XIV's court in France, and his fixation on proving himself the most Catholic of all Kings are things that will turn back a fair number of readers.

As one approaches the end of the book, one reads about the construction of Dom João V's huge convent. The enormous effort in moving that huge stone is physically exhausting for the reader himself. I found this the most vivid and entertaining part of the novel. The novel takes on the air of an epic in that section.

However, the portrayal of the royal procession is also a comic masterpiece. Ultimately, even the King finally realizes that death will render it all meaningless. He will not be alive when, and if, the convent is finally completed.

When all is said and done, we are left with this from earlier in the novel:

. . . there was no difference whatsoever between the ritual of those
lovers and the sacrifice of Holy Mass, and if there were, the Mass
would surely lose out.

What must it be like to inhabit José Saramago's brain? This novel is an exploration of it.

Besides the conversation of women, it is dreams that keep the world in orbit. But dreams also form a diadem of moons, therefore the sky is that splendor inside a man's head, if his head is not, in fact, his own unique sky.
Dasha Tenebre
I hate this book, it's disgusting and I don't like being obligated to read it.
Chad Bearden
If God were susceptible to such things, I fear this book would have left him with quite the black eye.

One of the brilliant things about this book is not that it knocks religion. There's nothing particularly original about that. It's that he attacks it not using inflammatory screeds or laundry lists of offenses committed against morality by those wrapped in holy motivations, but instead by plainly laying out the messy, horrible religion-driven culture of 18th century Lisbon as seen from the persp If God were susceptible to such things, I fear this book would have left him with quite the black eye.

One of the brilliant things about this book is not that it knocks religion. There's nothing particularly original about that. It's that he attacks it not using inflammatory screeds or laundry lists of offenses committed against morality by those wrapped in holy motivations, but instead by plainly laying out the messy, horrible religion-driven culture of 18th century Lisbon as seen from the perspective of both the Portuguese royal family and various commoners. The juxtaposition of these two tiers of society make the church and the monarchy look petty and foolish; not based on them being petty and foolish characatures, but based on the simple reality of how history played out.

It should be noted that the original Portuguese title of the novel would translate to mean "The Convent Memorial", as the driving event of the novel is the construction of a convent in the city of Mafra, the home city of Baltasar, a soldier who lost is left hand during war. Near the beginning of the novel, while traveling through Lisbon, he meets Blimunda, a young woman who is watching as her mother is exiled after being accused of being a Jew. Once the two have met, it almost goes without saying that we will then be treated to a standard romance story, wherein our couple will fall in love, be faced with some outside force which threatens to seperate them, then overcome that strain such that true love will prevail.

But not so fast! Rather than their relationship becoming a central arc of the narrative, they almost immediately consumate a marriage of sorts in a somewhat heretical way, then promptly go about their lives. They become the very definition of 'usassuming'. As we follow them throughout the course of the novel, we are not witness to their love story's struggles and hardships. Instead, we watch as they cheerfully go about their lives while the world around them bends and bows to the whims of King Joao V.

The Inquisition rounds up infidels the exile and burn them alive. Thousands of workers flock to Mafra to begin construction on a monstrous convent the King promised to some Franciscan monks in return for the modest favor from God of a healthy heir being born. Thousands more citizens are forcibly drafted to expand the construction to include a royal palace. The backs of the populous are broken in order to carry out what is framed by the monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church as being a holy crusade to glorify God...by way of building the King a really cool and expensive palace.

And through all of this, Baltasar and Blimunda just kind of exist. They have some minor adventures along the way, including an association with real life historical monk and part-time pseudo aviator, Bartolomeu Laurenco. His scheme to fly ties together with a special ability possessed by Blimunda to add a touch of magical-realism to the novel. But even this encounter, as well as one with the Neopolitan computer Dominico Scarlatti, does little to effect the lives of the two lovers.

The other major event in their lives comes along in the closing pages of the novel, and against the backdrop of the consecration of the unfinished convent, it further advances the idea that it is not for the glory of God that we exist and struggle, but for true love. The final page is one of the most beautiful endings I've ever read.

As I read this book, it was tempting to wonder just where Saramago was going with all this. He spends dozens of pages at a time describing the details of the convents construction, including a lenghty chapter about torturous transport of a huge marble stone from a quarry to Mafra. Ample space is given over to intricate descriptions of the royal entourage as they ride toward Spain where the Princess will be married off. Or the lavish account of the palace built specifically to house the Spanish and Portuguese parties as the negotiate the treaty that will accompany the arranged marriages.

All of those fussy complications must be highlighted, however, in order to better demonstrate the elegant simplicity of simply living life for the one you love, as opposed to the non-sensical and unfair practice of living a life in service to a church mandating arbitrary rules or to a King whose goals seem more concerned with prestige and wealth than about the true betterment of his kingdom.

Baltasar and Blimunda share a beautiful romance which, in its mundanity, rises above the stormy seas of history.

The more recent Jose Saramago novels I've read are interesting in their sparse accounts of average people in extraordinary (and high-concept) situations. "Baltasar and Blimunda" reminds me a lot more of the very first Saramago novel I ever read, "The Gospel According to Jesus Christ" in its lavish descriptions and innocent poeticism. I like the newer Saramago stuff, but reading this makes me hope that he'll find it in him to write another novel on this same epic and lush scale.
Cristiana Ramos
Este livro foi a primeira obra que li deste autor. Ainda não tinha tido o entusiasmo de pegar num livro de Saramago e ler, mas como no secundário é uma leitura obrigatória lá me aventurei nesta história. O livro inicia-se no século XVIII com D.João V, casado com D. Ana Maria Josefa já há dois anos, mas sem nenhum herdeiro. Faz uma promessa divina que se fosse realizado aquele pedido iria construir um convento para frades franciscanos. O "milagre" acontece, a rainha fica grávida e começa-se a con Este livro foi a primeira obra que li deste autor. Ainda não tinha tido o entusiasmo de pegar num livro de Saramago e ler, mas como no secundário é uma leitura obrigatória lá me aventurei nesta história. O livro inicia-se no século XVIII com D.João V, casado com D. Ana Maria Josefa já há dois anos, mas sem nenhum herdeiro. Faz uma promessa divina que se fosse realizado aquele pedido iria construir um convento para frades franciscanos. O "milagre" acontece, a rainha fica grávida e começa-se a construção do convento.

Temos ainda um padre chamado Bartolomeu que sonha em voar e por essa razão tenta construir uma máquina voadora, do qual dá o nome passarola. Ainda existe Baltazar, um ex-soldado maneta da mão esquerda, e Blimunda, a sua mulher, dotada do poder de ver o interior das coisas, que dão vida a esta história. Eles conhecem-se num auto-de-fé em que uma das condenadas é a mãe de Blimunda e a partir desse momento, o casal fica ligado para a vida.

Acompanhamos ao longo do livro o esforço do padre, do maneta e da visionária, unidos para verem a passarola voar um dia, seguimos as peripécias e as complicações na construção do convento, a dificuldade do povo e ainda alguma da exuberância da corte portuguesa.

Com uma escrita épica e totalmente fora do comum, tornando a leitura mais fluída, Saramago traz-nos com este livro uma crítica à sociedade portuguesa do séc. XVIII, fazendo com que o leitor reflicta e que tome consciência que muitos factos que são referidos no livro ainda acontecem em pleno século XXI. Admito que nos primeiros capítulos, costumou-me habituar àquela maneira incomum de escrever mas quando entrei no ritmo comecei a sentir a ironia, o sarcasmo e os vários tipos de humor.

Um livro clássico inspirado em acontecimentos verídicos mas que se centra nas pessoas que construíram o conventos, aqueles que puseram a sua vida em causa para ver aquele monumento erguer-se, acaba por ser uma forma de honrar aqueles que fizeram hoje possível ir a Mafra e poder-nos deliciar com aquele palácio!

Eu gostei bastante da história, de toda a sua complexidade, mas sinto que havia partes que eram desnecessárias e esperava mais do final. O leitor fica com dezenas de perguntas por responder e eu só pensava - Não pode acabar assim! - mas acabou. Fiquei com aquele gosto de quero mais e mais!

É um livro que demora a ler, devido à vastidão de conteúdos mas um livro que vale a pena ler, que nos faz reflectir sobre os nossos sonhos, as nossas vontades, aquilo que lutamos pela vida e sobre as relações interpessoais e tudo o que elas trazem desde dor, amor, amizade, mágoa, uma amplidão de sentimentos! Irei ler mais deste autor, o próximo será "As intermitências da Morte".
Rita Rosário
Depois de semanas e semanas a tentar ler este livro, consegui finalmente acabá-lo com a ajuda da maratona #hotsummerreading.
Esta é uma das leituras obrigatórias para o 12º ano e eu até hoje não consegui gostar menos de um livro. Nada me agradou nele.
A história é desinteressante e extremamente cansativa, sem surpresas ou reviravoltas que nos deixassem à espera de mais. As personagens ainda mais desinteressantes foram, não conseguir gostar de nenhuma e as relações eram construídas em cima de nada. Depois de semanas e semanas a tentar ler este livro, consegui finalmente acabá-lo com a ajuda da maratona #hotsummerreading.
Esta é uma das leituras obrigatórias para o 12º ano e eu até hoje não consegui gostar menos de um livro. Nada me agradou nele.
A história é desinteressante e extremamente cansativa, sem surpresas ou reviravoltas que nos deixassem à espera de mais. As personagens ainda mais desinteressantes foram, não conseguir gostar de nenhuma e as relações eram construídas em cima de nada. Sinceramente, as relações entre as personagens foram mesmo muito fracas.
O facto de não haver pontuação neste livro, ou seja, o autor não separava as falas das personagens e não utilizava mais nenhum sinal de pontuação sem ser o ponto final e a vírgula, ainda tornou este livro pior. Às vezes era bastante difícil de distinguir onde acabava o discurso de uma personagem e começava o outro. E não me venham dizer que é tudo uma questão de estilo do autor, porque não lhe custava nada utilizar pontuação e fazer parágrafos menores.
Depois, neste livro, tirando o facto da história ser, como eu já disse, monótona, não há história. Se me pedirem para fazer um resumo do livro eu não consigo, porque não há história para contar. Apenas uma longa narrativa de nada com um final estúpido e despropositado.
Falando no final, o que aconteceu não teve sentido nenhum. Não houve uma conclusão filosófica para o livro, ele acabou simplesmente. E já não era sem tempo...
Enfim, foi um milagre eu ter conseguido acabar este livro.
Ainda se perguntam o porquê de os alunos não gostarem de ler. Tomara se todos os livros que eles lhes atiram para ler são assim. Eu própria me esquecia que gostava de ler e que ler é muito mais divertido do que este livro.
Eu vou ter de estudá-lo nas aulas e talvez a minha opinião em relação ao memorial do convento mude. Mas por enquanto acho que é mesmo um dos piores livros que li, onde as personagens são secas, sem história e sem nada de interessante para dizer.
Quanto cheguei à última página chorei de felicidade.
É que nem as frases bonitas do autor salvaram este livro.
Hikachi
Okay, forget the unusual typesetting. Forget the totally rich details on the scenery as well as custom and religious views in Portugal during 15th century. Forget about the ingenious dream of flying using people's souls.
Baltasar and Blimunda is a love story.
It's a romance.
A romance where less words spoken mean more than a thousand love songs. No sweet words.
Baltasar Sete-Sois is a poor ex-soldier who lost his left arm in the war. Blimunda Sete-Luas is a daughter of a convict, with unusual featu Okay, forget the unusual typesetting. Forget the totally rich details on the scenery as well as custom and religious views in Portugal during 15th century. Forget about the ingenious dream of flying using people's souls.
Baltasar and Blimunda is a love story.
It's a romance.
A romance where less words spoken mean more than a thousand love songs. No sweet words.
Baltasar Sete-Sois is a poor ex-soldier who lost his left arm in the war. Blimunda Sete-Luas is a daughter of a convict, with unusual features like fair hair and grey/blue/green eyes.
When the convicts that thrown to an exile in Angola were paraded on the street, Baltasar was thinking if he could get an English whore, he prayed for one earlier that day. On the same occasion, Blimunda, watching her mother being paraded, thought that her mother wanted her to ask for the name of guy who was standing next to her. And there where it's all started. She turned and asked for Baltasar's name.
They got married that night. Not legally, but whatever, they stay together until the day he died. Even after he died.
Blimunda has a clairvoyance ability, that activated if she's fasting. She could see people's will and desire. That's why she opened her eyes after she eats something. At first, this habit puzzled Baltasar, but he didn't ask more, out of trust and love.
What's there between Baltasar and Blimunda is undoubtedly, something called love. Is it love at first sight for Baltasar? Maybe. Is it a fated love for Blimunda? Another maybe. This couple always true to their words, and never, as in never ever really ever they bothered to tell a lie or half truth to each other. It's either say or not say at all.
It's a slow paced novel with lots of long sentences. A typical of Jose Saramago. But again, it is indeed, a love story.
Martin Yankov
This is one of the most wonderful books I have ever read. And I’ve seen more than a few in my short life.

It is so wonderfully written, so magnificent, it just took my breath away... It’s a story of a soldier with one hand and the love of his life – a mysterious woman who has to eat each morning before opening her eyes. They live in 18th century, where the life of a commoner means nothing and they dream of building a flying machine to reach the sun.

The concept sounds interesting and I thought I This is one of the most wonderful books I have ever read. And I’ve seen more than a few in my short life.

It is so wonderfully written, so magnificent, it just took my breath away... It’s a story of a soldier with one hand and the love of his life – a mysterious woman who has to eat each morning before opening her eyes. They live in 18th century, where the life of a commoner means nothing and they dream of building a flying machine to reach the sun.

The concept sounds interesting and I thought I’d like the novel, but I never imagined how rich this book would turn out to be. The style is unique, each of those long, long sentences is powerful enough to fuel a whole novel. There are many social themes and ideas, as the book speaks of times when the king and the pope have an absolute power over an individual’s life. There are many mystical and magical moments and the characters possess some enigmatic abilities. And the book is also amazingly funny. There is so much irony in it, painful and properly used irony, that this whole world sometimes looks like a giant joke. It made me think of how sick the world is and how wicked any god must be, to create such a world. And I wonder if there is meaning in life, especially in the life of a simple commoner, like the hundred ones who died while building a gigantic monastery that the king ordered to please the god.

It’s absolutely a must-read. Absolutely.
Eliana Rivero
Lo que me gusta de Saramago aparte de cuestionarse todo, es la forma en la que escribe increíbles reflexiones sobre la vida, la muerte y el alma del ser humano. Esta novela es una bonita historia de amor, pero también es una historia donde están presentes las miserias humanas de las que nadie se salva y es contextualizado en una Portugal inmensamente religiosa, monárquica e inquisitorial.

Hay sarcasmo y humor en la historia, paradojas e ironías que te sacan sonrisas y hacen reconocible la narrati Lo que me gusta de Saramago aparte de cuestionarse todo, es la forma en la que escribe increíbles reflexiones sobre la vida, la muerte y el alma del ser humano. Esta novela es una bonita historia de amor, pero también es una historia donde están presentes las miserias humanas de las que nadie se salva y es contextualizado en una Portugal inmensamente religiosa, monárquica e inquisitorial.

Hay sarcasmo y humor en la historia, paradojas e ironías que te sacan sonrisas y hacen reconocible la narrativa de Saramago. Es la primera vez que lo leo en español y me pareció muy fluido en la manera que está escrito. A pesar de su estructura interna (la cuestión de los diálogos, los puntos y demás), uno se llega a acostumbrar y a comprender la historia.

En general, todo el libro gira en torno a Baltasar Sietesoles y Blimunda Sietelunas, en su relación con el padre Bartolomeu Lorenco y los demás personajes, buenos, malos, insignificantes. El Convento de Mafra y la vida de Juan V de Portugal es la excusa para hacer el contraste entre la vida del pueblo y de la monarquía, de las injusticias de Dios, de los diferentes puntos de vista sobre la religión y la brujería, etc. Es una novela que se disfruta muchísimo y que toca temas actuales bajo la premisa de ser una novela histórica.
Daniela S.
Começando pela opinião propriamente dita, o romance, na primeira parte, isto é, nas primeiras duzentas páginas, foi muito interessante de se ler. Surpreendentemente, adaptei-me facilmente à escrita inovadora e única do romancista. De facto, reconheço que a sua escrita, ao não obedecer propriamente às regras da escrita, principalmente nos diálogos, acaba por ser notável e dá um certo toque sublime à obra. Não é qualquer pessoa que pode alterar a escrita desta forma, e Saramago fez um trabalho est Começando pela opinião propriamente dita, o romance, na primeira parte, isto é, nas primeiras duzentas páginas, foi muito interessante de se ler. Surpreendentemente, adaptei-me facilmente à escrita inovadora e única do romancista. De facto, reconheço que a sua escrita, ao não obedecer propriamente às regras da escrita, principalmente nos diálogos, acaba por ser notável e dá um certo toque sublime à obra. Não é qualquer pessoa que pode alterar a escrita desta forma, e Saramago fez um trabalho estupendo e merece toda a aclamação que tem recebido, mesmo após a sua morte.

No entanto, não gostei nada do enredo... quer dizer, como estava a dizer, as primeiras 200 páginas foram boas, mantiveram-me interessada e lia facilmente, mesmo com uma escrita totalmente diferente e repleta de descrição.

Para ler a opinião na íntegra: http://simplesmenteamolivros.blogspot...
Jorge Martins
Foi o primeiro Saramago que li - espero que não seja o último - e adorei! É uma escrita completamente diferente àquilo a que estou habituado, mas ao fim de algum tempo acostumei-me e foi uma experiência incrível. O tom irónico e mordaz com que crítica o poder e a religião e mesmo os comentários que faz sobre a própria figura de Deus são, peço desculpa a expressão, divinos. Toda a inteligência da escrita, todos os comentários...
Não é um romance histórico, se o fosse, o narrador não poderia falar Foi o primeiro Saramago que li - espero que não seja o último - e adorei! É uma escrita completamente diferente àquilo a que estou habituado, mas ao fim de algum tempo acostumei-me e foi uma experiência incrível. O tom irónico e mordaz com que crítica o poder e a religião e mesmo os comentários que faz sobre a própria figura de Deus são, peço desculpa a expressão, divinos. Toda a inteligência da escrita, todos os comentários...
Não é um romance histórico, se o fosse, o narrador não poderia falar das invasões francesas, das aeronaves do futuro, etc. Mas é um romance fantástico que opõe a simplicidade da vida de um casal do povo, à complexidade da vida do casal real. Enquanto aqueles se amam incondicionalmente, estes vivem juntamente separados, com um casamento arranjado quase desde que nasceram.
É, no fundo, e sobretudo, uma ode àqueles que trabalharam para erguer o maior monumento a Deus consagrado.
joana
Como a maior parte das pessoas, tive que o ler para a aula de Português e devo dizer que fiquei surpreendida! Toda a gente me falava mal dele, da maneira como Saramago escrevia e devo confessar que até admiro bastante esse tipo de escrita. Não digo que a início seja fácil de perceber, mas com um bocado de tempo e paciência, a coisa vai lá!
A parte da construção do convento está muito bem feita, mas acho que peca muito pela enorme descrição de todos os detalhes - por vezes torna-se muito monótono Como a maior parte das pessoas, tive que o ler para a aula de Português e devo dizer que fiquei surpreendida! Toda a gente me falava mal dele, da maneira como Saramago escrevia e devo confessar que até admiro bastante esse tipo de escrita. Não digo que a início seja fácil de perceber, mas com um bocado de tempo e paciência, a coisa vai lá!
A parte da construção do convento está muito bem feita, mas acho que peca muito pela enorme descrição de todos os detalhes - por vezes torna-se muito monótono e difícil de acompanhar, como os autos da fé, procissões, a tourada, etc etc.
Mas o amor entre o Baltasar e a Blimunda é uma coisa bonita de ser ver, sem dúvida. Mas, sem dúvida, que a minha parte preferida foi a construção da passarola e a "doidice" do padre Bartolomeu.
E que final tão sem jeito Saramago! :-(
Laurie
This was the first work by Jose Saramago that I read. I was unprepared for the style: very long unpunctuated sentences with few capital letters and no paragraphing, but with a little effort the style becomes familiar and, though never 'easy', can be managed. It reminded me strongly of the magic realism of Latin American literature as it walks an indistinct line between what can be conceived of as reality and what is so strange that it has, in logical terms, to be thought to be magic. I found mys This was the first work by Jose Saramago that I read. I was unprepared for the style: very long unpunctuated sentences with few capital letters and no paragraphing, but with a little effort the style becomes familiar and, though never 'easy', can be managed. It reminded me strongly of the magic realism of Latin American literature as it walks an indistinct line between what can be conceived of as reality and what is so strange that it has, in logical terms, to be thought to be magic. I found myself rapidly and deeply immersed in it, and once I'd finished my read, I went out and bought or borrowed several more of Saramago's works. I felt that somehow this gave me a kind of immersion into the ways of the 18th Century -- a time of rationalism which (as one of my professors used to put it) formed a bridge of reason over a chasm of the chaos of poverty, degradation and unreason.
Powells.com
Widely considered to be one of the most accomplished works from Portugal's only Nobel laureate, Baltasar and Blimunda is a heart-wrenching epic of prodigious scope. Set in the early years of the eighteenth century, the story seamlessly intertwines elements of historical fact, romantic love, richly-imagined fantasy, and poignant wisdom. Satirical and mesmerizing, this tale is a towering achievement of considerable breadth — it explores the consequences of unmitigated power, the lofty and timeless Widely considered to be one of the most accomplished works from Portugal's only Nobel laureate, Baltasar and Blimunda is a heart-wrenching epic of prodigious scope. Set in the early years of the eighteenth century, the story seamlessly intertwines elements of historical fact, romantic love, richly-imagined fantasy, and poignant wisdom. Satirical and mesmerizing, this tale is a towering achievement of considerable breadth — it explores the consequences of unmitigated power, the lofty and timeless aspirations of the human spirit, and the quiet humility of enduring love. With a conclusion as riveting as it is doleful, Saramago's innate ability to capture even the most elusive of human idiosyncrasies will undoubtedly leave an indelible mark upon the reader.
Recommended by Jeremy G., Powells.com
Ben Crandell
I love Jose Saramago, but sometimes he really goes off on tangents. This book is my favorite one of his because it is actually a pretty touching love story mixed with European History (during the inquisition in Portugal) It flows nicely, its a sweet story on the surface, but under the theme of true love he finds plenty of room for his typical jabs at human behavior, royalty, governments, and religion. He is pretty ruthless, yet he is often uplifting and sentimental. How strange. He's a master, a I love Jose Saramago, but sometimes he really goes off on tangents. This book is my favorite one of his because it is actually a pretty touching love story mixed with European History (during the inquisition in Portugal) It flows nicely, its a sweet story on the surface, but under the theme of true love he finds plenty of room for his typical jabs at human behavior, royalty, governments, and religion. He is pretty ruthless, yet he is often uplifting and sentimental. How strange. He's a master, and this book is a wonderful blend of fantasy, history, and a strong dose of science versus the church (during the inquisition, mind) I really like the way he writes, but I also like olives.
Vanda
Pergunto-me:

SE eu sou fã de Saramago, SE eu gosto e entrego-me a cada livro que leio, SE cada vez me dá mais prazer lê-lo, PORQUE é que ainda não li a sua "obra-prima" e quando vou à estante pego sempre noutro qualquer? O que me tem afastado da famosa história de Blimunda e Baltasar?
(23-06-2012)
Este livro não deixa quem o lê indiferente, tal como nenhum livro de Saramago deixa. Mas este faz uma fusão brilhante entre a descrição da construção do Convento de Mafra, a história da passarola voadora Pergunto-me:

SE eu sou fã de Saramago, SE eu gosto e entrego-me a cada livro que leio, SE cada vez me dá mais prazer lê-lo, PORQUE é que ainda não li a sua "obra-prima" e quando vou à estante pego sempre noutro qualquer? O que me tem afastado da famosa história de Blimunda e Baltasar?
(23-06-2012)
Este livro não deixa quem o lê indiferente, tal como nenhum livro de Saramago deixa. Mas este faz uma fusão brilhante entre a descrição da construção do Convento de Mafra, a história da passarola voadora de Bartolomeu de Gusmão e o amor e vida e entrega de Blimunda e Baltasar sem descurar o contexto político-económico-social e religioso da época.
Muito bom.
(18-03-2014)
Sofia
Very serious social critic, made on a ironic/ sarcastic tone, which I loved. I never thought I was going to like Saramago until I read this book, I'm very surprized and now conscious of the reasons why this deserved a Nobel. Saramago's style might seem hard to understand, on a first contact, but now I totally respect it, I mean, as a future cientist I would like that people tried to understand my methods, if I tried to implement new ones.
Holly
Wow, I want to read more of this author. I found this book on the historical fiction list about Portugal. The author won the nobel prize and it is certainly deserved. The rich images, novel sentence structure,story and historical details are wonderful. I can still see the progression of people for religious holidays.
craige
It's magic realism and fabulous writing and run-on sentences and no quotation marks and a meandering narrative that is told by someone not actually in the story and I thought I knew who it was, but then maybe I was wrong.

It's not for everyone, but if you liked Blindness, you'll probably like this one, too. I gave it to Karyl.
Gustavo
Eu recomendaria esse livro apenas para fanáticos por Saramago que já leram todos os seus outros livros. Não posso sequer dizer que é um livro de 400 páginas que poderia ser contado em 150 - muitas vezes gasta-se uma página para dizer a coisa mais trivial, da forma mais banal possível. Porém, o final é incrivelmente ruim e amador. Saramago evoluiu muito após esta obra.
Nefertari
Recomendo esta leitura mas preferencialmente numa altura em que se encontrem disponíveis e com bastante tempo livre para o apreciarem sem pressas como ele merece.

Opinião mais detalhada em http://nefertari5.blogspot.pt/2013/07...
Reginacm
Obra marcada por uma fina ironia, relata a construção do convento de Mafra, essa grandiosa edificação do reinado de D. João V. Entrementes ficamos a conhecer a história de Baltazar e Blimunda, os costumes das gentes e os efeitos da Inquisição. Aconselho vivamente.
Elazar
Very good beginning, way too loooong middle, and a pretty good ending.
Carolayne
Tenho muito em que pensar, antes de fazer qualquer tipo de resenha para este livro... Mas fiquem apenas sabendo de que me rendi à escrita de Saramago, e que tenciono ler os restantes trabalhos dele.
Andreia
An amazing book, amazing stories, amazing writing. just an amazing author
barbara
this book broke me into tiny little pieces of madness and now of heartbreak because of that ending. THAT ENDING DESTROYED ME.
Filipa Alexandra
Gostei bastante do livro, coisa que me surpreendeu!
Elsa Gomes (BookishAurora)
Read this for school. It's a tedious book but it does have a good love story although the end is very sad for the couple.
Maria Teresa
imprescindível. adorei este livro. fez-me correr para Mafra.
carpe librorum :)
Primeiro livro que li do Saramago e o meu favorito. Este livro fez-me ir a Mafra visitar o Convento e pesquisar sobre os acontecimentos. É uma belíssima história de amor que se cruza com a História.
Barbara Valotto
Un libro regalato come macchina per volare ....bellissimo! Bisogna solo "entrare" nel modo di scrivere di questo autore e poi ....il volo è assicurato. Attenti a non precipitare, ci vuole costanza!
Alexandre
Segunda vez que leio, desta vez com olhos mais adultos e críticos e não consigo gostar. A história não tem interesse e não vejo qual o apelo e o carácter único da escrita de Saramago.
Inertiatic85
Non è facile scrivere un parere su un romanzo così complesso. Saramago non è uno scrittore facile, questo me lo conferma. Va affrontato con pazienza, c'è bisogno di immergersi totalmente nella sua scrittura che lascia senza fiato, che ha periodi lunghissimi, che va raramente a capo, che non usa punteggiatura al di fuori dei punti e delle virgole.
Non ho mai letto una storia d'amore così. E' la ribalta del popolo nella storia dei grandi re, dei grandi architetti, dei grandi musicisti. Eppure è un Non è facile scrivere un parere su un romanzo così complesso. Saramago non è uno scrittore facile, questo me lo conferma. Va affrontato con pazienza, c'è bisogno di immergersi totalmente nella sua scrittura che lascia senza fiato, che ha periodi lunghissimi, che va raramente a capo, che non usa punteggiatura al di fuori dei punti e delle virgole.
Non ho mai letto una storia d'amore così. E' la ribalta del popolo nella storia dei grandi re, dei grandi architetti, dei grandi musicisti. Eppure è un popolo destinato ugualmente alla sconfitta e a non entrare nella Storia. E' come se Saramago aprisse una parentesi per dire che sì, Giovanni V ha voluto il convento di Mafra, Johann Friedrich Ludwig l'ha progettato, ma è il popolo che l'ha eretto, l'ha sudato, l'ha sofferto.
Eppure questa storia non avrebbe avuto le caratteristiche del grande romanzo se non fosse stata arricchita dalla narrazione di una relazione atipica, tra un ragazzo monco dalla mano sinistra e una ragazza capace di vedere letteralmente "dentro" le persone.
E quante cose vere ci dice nel mezzo del racconto un grande scrittore come lui, capace di distaccarsi dalla storia e divagare con sapienza per poi rientrare nel racconto senza perdersi mai. Forse è un po' come "volare".
Molly
Having read Blindness by Saramago, I thought I had a sense of his writing style. This book challenged me. The story is fantastic. The characters are believable and mythical at the same time. The narrator is a storyteller to fall in love with. I was confused the whole way through the story. I loved it.

It is a real gift to weave history, legend, myth, drama and romance while being funny, ironic, skeptical, loving and kind. It is unlike any book I have ever read.

Set in Portugal in early 18th centu Having read Blindness by Saramago, I thought I had a sense of his writing style. This book challenged me. The story is fantastic. The characters are believable and mythical at the same time. The narrator is a storyteller to fall in love with. I was confused the whole way through the story. I loved it.

It is a real gift to weave history, legend, myth, drama and romance while being funny, ironic, skeptical, loving and kind. It is unlike any book I have ever read.

Set in Portugal in early 18th century, Baltasar is a wounded warrior that has lost his future when he lost his hand in battle. Blimunda gives him his future. The story uses the construction of the convent of Mafra to interweave the lives of royalty and their subjects. It is a pitiful story, but such is life. And believe it or not, you feel good when you are finished reading it.
Sara Santos
Saramago é um autor capaz de nos cativar desde a primeira até à última página. Em O Memorial do Convento, o autor leva-nos ao passado e a uma realidade que a mim me impressiona muito: queima de bruxas. É óbvio que por detrás de descrições tão cruéis Saramago esconde uma crítica sagaz à pequenez de pensamento de alguns (que persiste nos dias de hoje sob outras formas) e ao abuso da mão de obra que foi, é, e infelizmente parece que sempre será, vítima dos poderosos.
Sendo assim, o que mais admiro n Saramago é um autor capaz de nos cativar desde a primeira até à última página. Em O Memorial do Convento, o autor leva-nos ao passado e a uma realidade que a mim me impressiona muito: queima de bruxas. É óbvio que por detrás de descrições tão cruéis Saramago esconde uma crítica sagaz à pequenez de pensamento de alguns (que persiste nos dias de hoje sob outras formas) e ao abuso da mão de obra que foi, é, e infelizmente parece que sempre será, vítima dos poderosos.
Sendo assim, o que mais admiro nesta obra é que todos conseguimos ver um bocadinho de nós e do que se passa à nossa volta na Blimunda, no Baltasar, na rainha ou em qualquer dos trabalhadores do convento, porque a realidade do passado continua a ser muito presente.
wally
i'd started this one awhile back...never listed it at the time...got about 5% into it...on the kindle...set it aside...a review or two have said 'not an easy read'....

i'd since read the story about the elephant and the blindness story...so i've got some flavor of saramago...nobel prize winner that he is....and i don't feel so bad about the way i write my reviews...who reads them anyway? heh!

...looking back now there were some entertaining sections...some bit about some priest or holy man who die i'd started this one awhile back...never listed it at the time...got about 5% into it...on the kindle...set it aside...a review or two have said 'not an easy read'....

i'd since read the story about the elephant and the blindness story...so i've got some flavor of saramago...nobel prize winner that he is....and i don't feel so bad about the way i write my reviews...who reads them anyway? heh!

...looking back now there were some entertaining sections...some bit about some priest or holy man who dies and who does not stink...therefore he is a saint? heh! too, i'd highlighted this bit about god letting man know he is not needed when he impregnated mary. joseph was a carpenter. i am, as well. just saying.

...so...i endeavor to persevere!

oh yeah...also recall now (i figure to reread the 5% i'd read earlier) this dom joao, 5th monarch, is going to visit the bedchamber of the queen....dona maria ana josefa...(that anyone should blame the king is unthinkable...no kids as yet...me and the wife too....we'd been trying like hell now for....15 years i think it has been to no avail. alas...

yeah...so i'm going back through from the beginning though i'd been 5% done. the king and queen of portugal are trying to have a son. that process is described w/hilarity.

miracles are touched on...and there's this nice line...see, these silver lamps had been stolen (thieves galore) "the chains from which the missing lamps had been hanging were still swaying gently, whispering in the language of copper, we've had a narrow escape. we've had a narrow escape." nicely poetic. i wonder what that last sounds like in the native language?

narration
it starts out present tense...a kind of third omni...and then when the narration turns to the auto-da-fe....where they burn or otherwise punish...there comes a time when sebatiana maria de jesus, one-quarter converted jewess, speaks as an eye-narrator...."i have visions and revelations...."

this is blimunda's mother come to find out and she/blimunda speaks to baltasar who happens to be there to witness the various punishments.

then seems like the narration shifts to past tense...following blimunda & baltasar....and padre bartolomeu lourenco, the flying man...

too there is a time or two when this happens...."the age we have already established for baltasar..." to present again....

humor
in this one, more so than in blindness or the story about the elephant there is abundant humor...on the order of cervantes....

continuity?
there's this point where the time of four years is given...to do w/the war...yeah: "during the four years of war.."

...that seems at odds with a ship that "set sail some twenty months earlier..." just as baltasar was leaving to fight in the war...
time flies
at one point there's some bitt about time...500 years previous, 1211....so the time of the story is 1711 i take it...just before the 50% complete there is some more time bitts....1719 or so...and i should look, but i thought a few percentages prior there was a different time bitt...what was it? 1717 it was...to do w/building of the convent, the laying of a stone or two...first stones...big to do.

so while the building of this convent is taking place...mostly behind the scenes...baltasar and blimunda are busy w/acquiring wills...yes...wills....to fly the machine. ether won't do it quite right, if i have that right...this other guy, some friar tuck guy....called the flying man, padre bartolomeu lourenco...plus there's this other guy with his harpiscord or some darn thing that makes music and weighs alot. heh! they moved it in place.

was also this bitt about the bull fights...they took time to go to the bull fight and that was described somewhat.

blimunda can see things.
dreams
i enjoy how saramago uses dreams...so many story-tellers do not use dreams and the story-tellers who do use them seem to be on their toes....or something.

okay
there's a couple stories happening here...the story about the big wig of portugal..dom jo....who proclaims that if his wife, some woman he got from austria...if she has a baby he'll build a big building...hallelujah...he too makes this model, or plays w/this model of one of the big bldgs in rome...one of those big holy places...and he has some saints that he sets up on it....

which is kinda neato to me, as the local st joseph catholic church here in town has some saints on a shelf before the entrance...they are life size....kinda like dom jo's...see he has some big saint statues set up for the big building he is having built--his wife has a couple babies.
then there's the story of this other guy...some inventor guy who figures out how to make a flying machine...and baltasar and blimunda help him and they get the darn thing to fly even....imagine that.

anyway...good story...it's crazy but he has some sentences that go on for pages...i think that unless you know you can get away with it like he can (or faulkner or others) don't do shiite like that. sue me.
Raquel Dias da Silva
Li este livro para a disciplina de português de 12º ano. Não é que não tenha gostado, porque gostei da história e já tinha lido um livro de Saramago, pelo que a sua forma de escrever não me era desconhecida, mas dadas as circunstâncias acabei por olhar para a obra apenas como uma obrigação, sobretudo porque este tem sido um ano agitado e também porque eu tinha outros livros na prateleira que realmente queria ler, portanto penso que isso deve ter afectado a leitura.
Memorial do Convento retrata de Li este livro para a disciplina de português de 12º ano. Não é que não tenha gostado, porque gostei da história e já tinha lido um livro de Saramago, pelo que a sua forma de escrever não me era desconhecida, mas dadas as circunstâncias acabei por olhar para a obra apenas como uma obrigação, sobretudo porque este tem sido um ano agitado e também porque eu tinha outros livros na prateleira que realmente queria ler, portanto penso que isso deve ter afectado a leitura.
Memorial do Convento retrata de forma reconstituída, entrelaçando personagens e acontecimentos verídicos com seres conseguidos pela ficção, a história portuguesa do reinado de D. João V, no séc. XVIII, numa tentativa de relacionar os acontecimentos com as relações políticas de meados do séc. XX. Caracteriza uma época de excessos e desigualdades sociais, que continuam presentes na actualidade, de modo que esta é naturalmente uma obra intemporal. Além disso, é-nos oferecida uma minuciosa descrição da sociedade portuguesa no início do séc. XVIII, deixando transparecer uma clara preocupação com o operariado reprimido e visa denunciar a história repressiva portuguesa na primeira metade do séc. XX.
Existem duas linhas condutoras da acção, a construção do Convento de Mafra, como cumprimento da promessa feita por D. João V a um padre franciscano, e as relações entre Baltazar, um ex-soldado maneta, e Blimunda, filha de uma condenada ao degredo por bruxarias e também ela possuidora de uma capacidade mística. A construção do Convento de Mafra traduz o entrelaçamento entre o desejo megalómano de um rei e o sofrimento de um povo, enquanto a história de amor entre Sete-Sóis e Sete-Luas fala da espiritualidade, da ternura, do misticismo e da magia.
O amor de Blimunda e Baltasar é feito de genuinidade, porque nenhum espera algo do outro, dão e recebem apenas porque se amam verdadeiramente. E esse seu amor incondicional é retratado sem romantismo, mas não deixa de ser bonito porque mais real. Blimunda consegue perceber a vida, a morte, o amor e o pecado, porque vê mesmo às escuras. Baltasar é o seu contra-peso, quem vê às claras. Ambos se completam e harmonizam e por isso tão destinados um ao outro, o que acaba por ser sentenciado no fim quando nos damos conta do carácter cíclico da história - conhecem-se num auto-de-fé e encontram-se pela última vez num auto-de-fé.
Quando estes dois se juntam ao Padre Bartolomeu Loureço de Gusmão, na construção da Passarola, tudo se torna perfeito, juntando a ciência e os esboços do padre com o trabalho artesanal de Baltasar e a magia de Blimunda, que recolhe as vontades, o éter. Sem esquecer claro a música de Scarlatti. Assim, a Passarola Voadora simboliza a harmonia entre o sonho e a sua realização e também a fraternidade capaz de unir homens cultos a gente popular.
Um dos episódios que eu gostei muito foi todo o processo do transporte da pedra até ao Convento. É longo, moroso e sinceramente eu acho que dava um filme. Só a porcaria do transporte da pedra dava um filme e acho que ia ser fantástico!
Em suma, é uma obra em que o narrador faz imenso uso da crítica e da ironia, fazendo juízos valorativos e brincando com as palavras de uma forma extraordinária, mas também tenta transmitir a importância do sonho e da vontade para a sua concretização, porque a vontade nunca é demais e é o sonho que comanda a vida.
Vasco Ribeiro
Provavelmente de uma forma injusta, parti para a leitura do livro predisposto a não gostar. Enganei-me.
É uma obra maior de um Autor. Dá ideia que ele falou de tudo, que usou todos os seus recursos na escrita deste livro, pelo que fico curioso em ler mais livros dele, para saber do que lhe restou falar. Usa um vocabulário muito rico, construção difícil das frases, mas é disso que eu gosto: Os desafios à inteligência do leitor. Imagens muito ricas, àpartes muito interessantes, associações de ideia Provavelmente de uma forma injusta, parti para a leitura do livro predisposto a não gostar. Enganei-me.
É uma obra maior de um Autor. Dá ideia que ele falou de tudo, que usou todos os seus recursos na escrita deste livro, pelo que fico curioso em ler mais livros dele, para saber do que lhe restou falar. Usa um vocabulário muito rico, construção difícil das frases, mas é disso que eu gosto: Os desafios à inteligência do leitor. Imagens muito ricas, àpartes muito interessantes, associações de ideias, e muitas vezes uma quase poesia na sua prosa. Merecia, se calhar, um leitor mais racional do que eu, com tempo para assimilar devidamente a riqueza da mensagem.
A história é a de Blimunda sete luas e de Baltasar sete sois. Mas é também a história do Padre Bartolomeu Lourenço, também Gusmão, para os outros por necessidade de prestígio. Da construção da Passarola, mas também da construção do Convento de Mafra. E de D. JOão V, e de Deus, que não tem mão esquerda porque dela necessita, como Baltasar, mas este necessitava dela, não fosse tê-la perdido na guerra. Mas ganhou Blimunda que tem olhos diferentes, que não se sabe bem de que cor são, e que consegue ver o interior das pessoas, se estiver em jejum, mas que não quer ver o interior de baltasar, assim o jurou, porque não quer entrar nele, não por medo de se entrar nas pessoas, porque quer que Baltasar entre em si, e assim compor no seu casal a normalidade das pessoas. História também da família de baltasar, porque da de Blimunda pouco há que contar, a não ser que sua mãe por suspeita de bruxaria foi mandada para angola pela santa inquisição. E história de muitos mais, não vale a pena pôr aqui os nomes, porque na verdade, pôr aqui os nomes deles o que acrescenta? Fora pensarmos que nos acrescenta alguma coisa e que ficamos mais sabedores por os nomes deles os sabermos por eles aqui terem sido colocados. A parte mais simbólica é a da caça às "vontades" feita por Blimunda, para que a passarola voasse. E voou -ou não terá voado?- porque as vontades daqueles 3 e de muitos outros assim o quis? E o Convento construiu-se por promessa de D. João V e por sua vontade, que por ser de Rei pode mais que os outros.
Jack
Jose Saramago has created a completely magical world that is evidently both our own and a breathtaking act of historical re-creation. The setting is a rural village in 18th C. Portugal, where the king has elected to erect a new monastery, since he's been told that doing so will result in his having a son, an heir to one of Europe's most powerful thrones. The building of this immense edifice is the spine of this tale - but there is much more to it than that.

Our primary characters are the titular Jose Saramago has created a completely magical world that is evidently both our own and a breathtaking act of historical re-creation. The setting is a rural village in 18th C. Portugal, where the king has elected to erect a new monastery, since he's been told that doing so will result in his having a son, an heir to one of Europe's most powerful thrones. The building of this immense edifice is the spine of this tale - but there is much more to it than that.

Our primary characters are the titular Baltasar and his beloved Blimunda, who meet as her mother is being executed for witchcraft. This may be true, as the two lovers are immediately and completely bound to one another from this moment forward. Blimunda will prove to have her own extraordinary powers, which they learn to use for good ends. Baltasar, left one-handed in the last war, makes the best of his limitations, and the most of his opportunities. And what opportunities Saramago imagines for our resourceful duo!

The most dynamic of these is their acting as servants and assistants to Padre Lourenco, who has designed a giant flying machine, resembling an immense bird. Only Bluminda's remarkable gift for capturing human wills can render it flight-worthy, a task she willingly undertakes. This adventure, the centerpiece of the novel, is as thrilling as it is unlikely - but you never question, as the event itself is so entrancingly written. Their maiden voyage bears no detail - find out for yourself.

Throughout the novel, there are a staggering array of digressions, portraits of life in 18th C. Portugal which bear the hallmark of intensive research coupled with vivid imagination. Saramago can seemingly make any subject interesting - the construction of foundation walls for churches and cloisters, the planting of vegetable gardens in inhospitable territory, the fabrication of Baltasar's artificial hand and its various forms.

These flights of fancy are real virtuoso moments, all the more amazing being in translation from the original Portugese. Giovanni Pontiero deserves special praise for this elegant translation.

Fanciful, engaging, thought-provoking - a deep and delicious read.

Nelson
A re-read and on this occasion the novel seemed slightly less appealing than it did on the first, perhaps because on this reading the prose style, an endless series of dependent clauses strung together with fanciful or no punctuation and even, at times, independent clauses thrown into the mix, felt less an innovation, a left-handed inspiration for latter-day realists of magic, than old hat, even if the Portuguese progenitor of said method predated all his erstwhile imitators by decades. Saramago A re-read and on this occasion the novel seemed slightly less appealing than it did on the first, perhaps because on this reading the prose style, an endless series of dependent clauses strung together with fanciful or no punctuation and even, at times, independent clauses thrown into the mix, felt less an innovation, a left-handed inspiration for latter-day realists of magic, than old hat, even if the Portuguese progenitor of said method predated all his erstwhile imitators by decades. Saramago's grammatical unit of construction is the paragraph, laboriously constructed from multiplied units of meaning, layered with modifiers and lists, sometimes put together less to advance the plot and more simply to show off (so it seems) a sense of invention limited, if at all, by the need to take a breath once in a while rather than any other barriers, as in the many examples of say (to name just two) religious orders or saints, described in minute detail, right down to the clothes the orders wear or the ways in which they were martyred respectively. And then typically these complex predicates, built up over many lines and sometimes pages, wander so graphically from their stated subject or points of origin that the bedeviled reader, in thrall to the incantatory quality of Saramago's prose must nevertheless admit confusion and defeat, scurrying back to the beginning of the paragraph to find out what he was supposed to be paying attention to in the first place. Our author's only concession to weary eyes and flagging attention seems to be his almost metronomic insistence on concluding these stemwinders with pithy epigrams or aphorisms. Thank heaven for small favors.

Despite the frustration and exhaustion that the style forces on the reader, the story remains a fantastically moving one, particularly when Saramago gives over the saints and the king and the woes of the queen and the endlessly rising towers at Mafra and woebegotten state of Portugal generally and gets down to the epic, warm, wonderful love tale of Baltasar and Blimunda. That's the real treasure here.
sahsahx
This is the best book I've had to read for class.

First, let me say that this is a Historical Romance based on portuguese history around the 18th century. It relates four narratives that co-exist into one, the construction of a convent in Mafra.
The story starts with king Dom John V of Portugal and his queen, that isn't able to conceive. Dom John then makes a promise to build a convent if the queen gives birth to an infant.

The story-line that really made me get into this book was the love story be This is the best book I've had to read for class.

First, let me say that this is a Historical Romance based on portuguese history around the 18th century. It relates four narratives that co-exist into one, the construction of a convent in Mafra.
The story starts with king Dom John V of Portugal and his queen, that isn't able to conceive. Dom John then makes a promise to build a convent if the queen gives birth to an infant.

The story-line that really made me get into this book was the love story between Baltasar Mateus and Blimunda de Jesus (the daughter of a so-called witch, that is able to see the interior of people when she's fasting), that after getting unofficially married by a single Father, start being called Sete-Sóis (Seven Suns) and Sete-Luas (Seven Moons). This shows, from the start, that they are a couple that complement one another and that their romance is even more developed throughout the book.

There's also another story-line that gets constantly intertwined with the love story of Baltasar and Blimunda. That is the dream of flying of the priest Bartolomeu Gusmão that finally builds a flying machine (Passarola) and is able to fly together with the couple. I'm happy to acknowledge that was a portuguese who invented a flying machine and was able to take the idea further!

Concluding, this book is a masterpiece with the perfect criticism, since it's still so actual in the portuguese society and it's so eye-opening in the subject of betrayal, christianism, marriage, poverty in contrast with the richness of the king and the people, that is also criticized for not seeking changes and a better life.

Also, the big hero of this book is us, the people that worked for a greater figure, that walked eight days to get that huge rock from Pêro Pinheiro to Mafra, when they could have worked with three or ten of a smaller size.
Madhuri
A very mature first novel, even for an author of great promise as Saramago. Baltasar and Blimunda is a highly ambitious tale of historical fantasy, centered around historical events (construction of the convent), inter-meshing in it notable historical figures - Padre Bartolomeu Lourenço and Domenico Scarlatti, not to mention the royal ensemble. Even though the book often gets mired in detail (mostly distracting), and is sometimes coldly impersonal for a passionate love story that it is supposed A very mature first novel, even for an author of great promise as Saramago. Baltasar and Blimunda is a highly ambitious tale of historical fantasy, centered around historical events (construction of the convent), inter-meshing in it notable historical figures - Padre Bartolomeu Lourenço and Domenico Scarlatti, not to mention the royal ensemble. Even though the book often gets mired in detail (mostly distracting), and is sometimes coldly impersonal for a passionate love story that it is supposed to be, it achieves a lot. It takes an idea that resided only in Lourenço's mind and on some sketches, and makes it into a tale of passion and will, struggle and freedom.
Lourenço, better known as Bartolomeu de Gusmão in Portuguese history, was an 18th century priest, who had ideas to build a airship. He presented the concept to the king, who agreed to fund this enterprise. It is however believed that the Inquisition forbade him to carry on the work, and he escaped to Spain. In Saramago's version of the story, Lourenço is successful in making the machine with the help of a couple - one-handed Baltasar and magical, enigmatic Blimunda. To escape the inquisition, they fly away on the airship. What follows is a less fantastic tale, for Saramago's bleak tale reminds us that personal freedom is short lived in the face of forces such as religion and monarchy.
I only wish that Saramago had forsaken a few details - it sometimes seemed like I was reading 2-3 different books - their content, tone and style differed so often.
Izzy
This was not an easy book to start. It took perseverance to get past the initial discomfort of the rambling, never-ending sentences, and the self-conscious narration that refuses to let you escape and immerse yourself into a magical past.

But when you finally settle into the unique rhythm and style of this story, the beauty of the characters, the period, and the unusual writing shines through. Saramago boldly illustrates a distinct place and time—in all its glory, grit, opulence, filth, smells, a This was not an easy book to start. It took perseverance to get past the initial discomfort of the rambling, never-ending sentences, and the self-conscious narration that refuses to let you escape and immerse yourself into a magical past.

But when you finally settle into the unique rhythm and style of this story, the beauty of the characters, the period, and the unusual writing shines through. Saramago boldly illustrates a distinct place and time—in all its glory, grit, opulence, filth, smells, and injustices. Rich and poor, Christians and pagans, scientific minds and superstitious fools—we witness human existence stripped of sentimental pretenses. A king's life is pampered but just as putrid and bed-bug-filled as all other men in those times. A peasant's life is no idyll, full of ugliness, pettiness, filth and suffering; yet the will to love and live still find ways to flourish and endure.

I love the overall construction of the story, and the relationship between the characters. We start with the King and the Queen, and the conception of the convent in Mafra—and the meeting of Baltasar and Blimunda during festivities of an Inquisition. We end decades later with the consecration of the convent in Mafra, and the separation of Baltasar and Blimunda during another Inquisition. The King and the handicapped mendicant-soldier never meet, but they share a bond through their friendship to a priest who dreams of flying in defiance of the Church's teachings.

I can see this as a Miyazaki film...
João Miranda
Fazer batota não traz frutos. Utilizar resumos da obra, com o objectivo de preparar os exames nacionais do secundário, é uma saída fácil e eficaz para quem tem muito para onde se virar. Mesmo assim, talvez tenha tomado a melhor opção porque mais maduro se apura o gosto de uma leitura soberba.

Longe vão os anos desta decisão. Por essa altura, já não gostava de livros tristes. Continuo a não gostar, ainda que tenha adorado Memorial do Convento. A narração duma promessa, a promessa do rei para a con Fazer batota não traz frutos. Utilizar resumos da obra, com o objectivo de preparar os exames nacionais do secundário, é uma saída fácil e eficaz para quem tem muito para onde se virar. Mesmo assim, talvez tenha tomado a melhor opção porque mais maduro se apura o gosto de uma leitura soberba.

Longe vão os anos desta decisão. Por essa altura, já não gostava de livros tristes. Continuo a não gostar, ainda que tenha adorado Memorial do Convento. A narração duma promessa, a promessa do rei para a construção do Convento de Mafra em troca de sucessão, e a estória de um casal com origem no povo, pobre, mas dedicados ao outro. O livro recua mais de dois séculos para demonstrar a pobreza vivida em tempos de riqueza imperial; um rei com desejos megalómanos, rodeado de um povo crente na igreja e na pequena refeição diária, um povo fiel ao país e ao reino, desejoso de mostrar serviço em troca de pouco. Pelo meio, Saramago revela um padre com sonhos mais altos do que o próprio paraíso e que arrasta para a sua sombra o casal, Blimunda e Baltasar.

E assim a história desenrola-se, num ritmo calmo, triste, e escrito de forma fantástica. Utilizado para premiar Saramago como prémio nobel da literatura, Memorial do Convento será um dos livros de eleição da literatura portuguesa. Será difícil ultrapassar isto.
Infecteddaemon
José Saramago has never made straight forward love stories. You know, the kind that drive teenagers crazy, about longing looks and romantic poetry and supposedly long sensuous caresses; yeah, the kind that makes you regurgitate lunch for a bit to allow you to ruminate on it for a while before being forced to swallow it again.

This book in particular does not have the feel or taste of a love story at all, but the realization that it is a love story dawns on you as you go on thorough the hedge maze José Saramago has never made straight forward love stories. You know, the kind that drive teenagers crazy, about longing looks and romantic poetry and supposedly long sensuous caresses; yeah, the kind that makes you regurgitate lunch for a bit to allow you to ruminate on it for a while before being forced to swallow it again.

This book in particular does not have the feel or taste of a love story at all, but the realization that it is a love story dawns on you as you go on thorough the hedge maze that is Saramago's narrative. It takes you on a side track through the life of XVIII century Portugal and the construction of the biggest religious monument of that country; through the life of the king that ordered the creation of the Convent of Mafra, the people who participated in it; it tells you about the oppressed -and not so repressed- sexuality of the era, it contrasts the life and love of said king, to the ways and loving of the simple people (but, how simple can the love of a one-armed soldier and a women with powers be?). The book reveals to us the story behind the creation of the first flying machine, and the fate of the people involved in its creation... and through all of it, its a story of love that does not have a single word of love, only acceptance and passion. And I ask to all, what else is needed?
Descending Angel
A great book that entwines two main stories set in the eighteenth century, firstly the love story of the title characters and their "flying machine" and then there is the story of the king and the building of a Convent in Mafra ~ a real palace-monastery located in Portugal. I found it really cool that this book is a mix of real history and real people (Domenico Scarlatti and the priest Bartolomeu de Gusmão) and fantasy/magic, it really works well. I also found that it pretty funny, not laugh out A great book that entwines two main stories set in the eighteenth century, firstly the love story of the title characters and their "flying machine" and then there is the story of the king and the building of a Convent in Mafra ~ a real palace-monastery located in Portugal. I found it really cool that this book is a mix of real history and real people (Domenico Scarlatti and the priest Bartolomeu de Gusmão) and fantasy/magic, it really works well. I also found that it pretty funny, not laugh out loud funny but witty funny. It's not an easy read and it does drag in places but
Baltasar and Blimunda are awesome and the last 20 pages are perfect and heart breaking.
Christin
So I picked this up because I was home for Thanksgiving and finished the book I had brought and this was the one thing on Dad's bookshelf that looked tolerable. (Mom's bookshelf is full of John Grisham and Nicholas Sparks, aka, totally intolerable.) I don't know why I'm in the middle of an Iberian peninsula, Inquisition kick because if you'd asked me if that was something I'd want to read oh, six months ago I probably would have told you no. But after finishing this and The Monk and starting Man So I picked this up because I was home for Thanksgiving and finished the book I had brought and this was the one thing on Dad's bookshelf that looked tolerable. (Mom's bookshelf is full of John Grisham and Nicholas Sparks, aka, totally intolerable.) I don't know why I'm in the middle of an Iberian peninsula, Inquisition kick because if you'd asked me if that was something I'd want to read oh, six months ago I probably would have told you no. But after finishing this and The Monk and starting Manuscript Found in Saragossa I guess the answer will have to change to "eh" *shrug.*

The style was the most noticeable part, the rambling sentences and the lack of standard punctuation. It took getting used to and a lot of focus not to just wander off into the dreamy words and look back at the page and realize I'd absorbed absolutely nothing. "What just happened?" "Uhhh... dunno." I probably could have read it twice as fast if I'd been paying a little more attention.

Loved Baltasar and Blimunda together and they anchor the book but they are not the sole focus and when they weren't I found myself drifting. Noooo, I want to read more about THEM, fuck the Queen and her praying bullshit. Which may be the point but I'm not smart enough to tell.
Antonietta
Il memoriale è un libro pieno di opposti che convivono benissimo assieme. Rigorosamente storico e allo stesso tempo fantastico, tiene incollati alle sue pagine nonostante la difficoltà di leggere uno stile senza pause (i punti sono pochissimi, le frasi raggiungono anche le due pagine e mezzo, la mia maestra sarebbe inorridita).

L'ambientazione è nel Portogallo Settecentesco, al tempo del re Giovanni V (io non lo avevo mai sentito nominare naturalmente) e partendo dalla vicenda della costruzione Il memoriale è un libro pieno di opposti che convivono benissimo assieme. Rigorosamente storico e allo stesso tempo fantastico, tiene incollati alle sue pagine nonostante la difficoltà di leggere uno stile senza pause (i punti sono pochissimi, le frasi raggiungono anche le due pagine e mezzo, la mia maestra sarebbe inorridita).

L'ambientazione è nel Portogallo Settecentesco, al tempo del re Giovanni V (io non lo avevo mai sentito nominare naturalmente) e partendo dalla vicenda della costruzione del convento di Mafra (ora Palazzo reale, una delle maggiori attrazioni portoghesi), raccontata con particolari storici dettagliati, Saramago vi intreccia la storia dei due protagonisti, Baltasar e Blimunda, legati da un amore profondo e unico, che vivranno, pur nella normalità delle loro esistenze, avvenimenti straordinari e magici. Il finale è appena un po' deludente; la storia va a spegnersi lentamente, quasi con naturalezza, ma gli ultimi avvenimenti sembrano piuttosto forzati, quasi a voler trovare una conclusione diversa da quello che è l'insieme di ampio respiro del romanzo.

Nel complesso godibile (vabbè, Saramago è un premio Nobel!) ha per me il valore aggiunto di avermi fatto scoprire un Paese, il Portogallo, di cui finora conoscevo pochissimo.
Rita
I first have to say that I read this book because it was compulsory at high school, in the year of 2010. However, that was not an obstacle for me and I didn't feel at any point that I had to read it just because my teacher said so.

Saramago is my favorite Portuguese writer of all times. This was the first book of him I read and it is my absolute favorite. In it, the writer entangles reality with magic while creating a story for the construction of the Mafra convent in the 18th century. Baltasar I first have to say that I read this book because it was compulsory at high school, in the year of 2010. However, that was not an obstacle for me and I didn't feel at any point that I had to read it just because my teacher said so.

Saramago is my favorite Portuguese writer of all times. This was the first book of him I read and it is my absolute favorite. In it, the writer entangles reality with magic while creating a story for the construction of the Mafra convent in the 18th century. Baltasar and Blimunda are along with Priest Bartolomeo the main characters, who defy the established social norms in many ways. Baltasar and Blimunda are a couple who live together despite the fact that they are not married. Nevertheless, their love is depicted as pure, sacred and true. Bartolomeo is the only Catholic figure who stands out because of his moral values while the other Churchmen are extremely criticized for their dishonesty, obliquity and immorality.

Along with the building of the Portuguese monument, there is also another story which must not be underestimated: the construction of a "passarola" by Bartolomeo, an instrument which would allow him to fly - again daring Catholic assumptions.

In the end, it is the building of the dream that guides this book.
Karyl
I actually really enjoyed the meandering storyline, and the way the author would switch voices in the middle of a chapter to someone completely different, though on occasion it did get confusing. Quotation marks would have been a huge help, even though I read Andersonville, which also lacks quotation marks, without any problems, though I think MacKinley Kantor made it far more clear who was speaking.

However, I felt this book didn't really achieve its point. It was a fun read, a nifty glimpse in I actually really enjoyed the meandering storyline, and the way the author would switch voices in the middle of a chapter to someone completely different, though on occasion it did get confusing. Quotation marks would have been a huge help, even though I read Andersonville, which also lacks quotation marks, without any problems, though I think MacKinley Kantor made it far more clear who was speaking.

However, I felt this book didn't really achieve its point. It was a fun read, a nifty glimpse into the history of a country not normally written about (Portugal), but it didn't seem to come to a clear and concise point. I don't feel like I learned anything from it, except that sometimes love transcends all. I knew that already, though. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys slightly oddball historical fiction, but leave your high expectations at the door.

I look forward to reading Blindness, however.
Riet
Door de traag werkende post hier ben k genoodzaakt om boeken te gaan herlezen. Uiteindelijk niet zo slecht: veel boeken zijn weer als nieuw na zo'n 20/25 jaar. Dit boek (in het Nederlands " memoriaal van een klooster") vind ik een van de mooiste van deze schrijver. Gedeeltelijk historisch juist, maar uiteraard met verzonnen hoofdpersonen. Baltasar, een hand kwijt geraakt in de oorlog, en Blimunda, dochter van een vrouw die door de inquisitie wordt verbannen naar Angola, ontmoeten elkaar bij een Door de traag werkende post hier ben k genoodzaakt om boeken te gaan herlezen. Uiteindelijk niet zo slecht: veel boeken zijn weer als nieuw na zo'n 20/25 jaar. Dit boek (in het Nederlands " memoriaal van een klooster") vind ik een van de mooiste van deze schrijver. Gedeeltelijk historisch juist, maar uiteraard met verzonnen hoofdpersonen. Baltasar, een hand kwijt geraakt in de oorlog, en Blimunda, dochter van een vrouw die door de inquisitie wordt verbannen naar Angola, ontmoeten elkaar bij een auto-da-fe en leven verder samen. Inmiddels heeft de koning een belofte gedaan, dat er een groot klooster voor de franciscanen zal worden gebouwd, als zijn vrouw zwanger raakt. Dat laatste lukt en na de geboorte beginnen ze aan het klooster. Daar raken B en Bl. bij betrokken. Zij leren ook een monnik kennen, die een soort vliegende machine heeft bedacht. Zij helpen hem daarbij. Op zich een schitterend verhaal, maar het mooist vind ik alle terzijdes van de schrijver waarin hij zijn gal spuugt over de koningen, de kerk en wat dies meer zij. Saramago was een overtuigde communist en dat kan je merken. Maar alles wel met veel humor geschreven.
Debbie
Saramago's style was distracting - a breathless jumble of detail narrated in interminable run-on sentences - but the subject matter interesting - a scathing criticism of the Catholic church and Portuguese monarchy in the early 18th century. What made it more fun was the narrator, a seemingly naive villager who purports to support the system but whose shrugs and concessions rattle our complacency and instigate our outrage. The contrast between the earthly, exalted love of two odd workers (a maime Saramago's style was distracting - a breathless jumble of detail narrated in interminable run-on sentences - but the subject matter interesting - a scathing criticism of the Catholic church and Portuguese monarchy in the early 18th century. What made it more fun was the narrator, a seemingly naive villager who purports to support the system but whose shrugs and concessions rattle our complacency and instigate our outrage. The contrast between the earthly, exalted love of two odd workers (a maimed war veteran and an occasional clairvoyent who can see people's souls) and the ridiculously orchestrated marriage of the monarchs, told against the backdrop of the construction of a Franciscan monastery built by the terribly abused workers, provides a criticism of the hypocrisy of the church and the flimsiness of its values. The viewpoint swings between heavenly and earthly, including a flight in a balloon-like aerial contraption, ending up grounded in what might be our only reality.

Just saw the documentary about Saramago's last years, focused very much on his wife and all his literary obligations after winning the Nobel. Highly recommended - Jose y Pilar.
Emily
I loved this wonderful book. Somewhere along the line it kind of morphed into the Pillars of the Earth, Jose-Saramago-style, and lawd knows I am all about that combo.

My favorite quote, from page 321:
The wind beat against the stationary vanes of the wind-mills and whistled in the clay pots, these are details observed by those who stroll without care in the world, who are content just to stroll and contemplate that cloud in the sky, the sun as it begins to set, the wind that blows up here only to I loved this wonderful book. Somewhere along the line it kind of morphed into the Pillars of the Earth, Jose-Saramago-style, and lawd knows I am all about that combo.

My favorite quote, from page 321:
The wind beat against the stationary vanes of the wind-mills and whistled in the clay pots, these are details observed by those who stroll without care in the world, who are content just to stroll and contemplate that cloud in the sky, the sun as it begins to set, the wind that blows up here only to die down over there, the leaf shaken from its branch or dropping to the ground when it withers, that an old and cruel soldier has eyes for such details, a soldier who has a man's death on his conscience, a crime perhaps redeemed by other episodes in his life, such as to have been marked with a cross signed in blood over his heart, and has perceived how huge the world is and how small all that inhabits it, and speaks to his oxen in a low and gentle voice, this may seem little, but someone will know if it is enough.
Faran
Stopped at page 163. The only book on my read list that was too boring for me to finish. I am one of those people who have a hard time leaving books unfinished, so because of that this book drastically reduced the amount of non-academic reading I did for several months before I finally got sensible and put it down. It was terribly, dreadfully boring.

The first chapter was somewhat interesting, but if you start the second and find that it's boring you-and I am shocked that there is anyone who wou Stopped at page 163. The only book on my read list that was too boring for me to finish. I am one of those people who have a hard time leaving books unfinished, so because of that this book drastically reduced the amount of non-academic reading I did for several months before I finally got sensible and put it down. It was terribly, dreadfully boring.

The first chapter was somewhat interesting, but if you start the second and find that it's boring you-and I am shocked that there is anyone who wouldn't-spare yourself. It doesn't get any better. At least not anywhere up to page 163.

And all of Saramago's observations about and religious authority and cultural norms are trite and found in any other book that touches on these themes. What a terrible disappointment.

For the record, historical romances are my favorite. But I have another Saramago book that I haven't started-history of the siege of Lisbon-and I don't see myself even glancing at the first page. Both are being donated to the library, but only because I can see that other people like them.
Ilmatte
ora lo sappiamo, come far volare le macchine. perché son le macchine che volano, le donne e gli uomini non hanno ancora imparato a farlo se non nei sogni. ora lo sappiamo, ma facciamo finta di non saperlo, torniamo a quando volavano solo i sogni. allora una macchina capace di volare non era meno incredibile di una donna capace di vedere dentro e attraverso le persone. di vederne le volontà, di carpirle nel momento in cui si staccano dal corpo morente. ci vuole uno sforzo di fantasia per credere ora lo sappiamo, come far volare le macchine. perché son le macchine che volano, le donne e gli uomini non hanno ancora imparato a farlo se non nei sogni. ora lo sappiamo, ma facciamo finta di non saperlo, torniamo a quando volavano solo i sogni. allora una macchina capace di volare non era meno incredibile di una donna capace di vedere dentro e attraverso le persone. di vederne le volontà, di carpirle nel momento in cui si staccano dal corpo morente. ci vuole uno sforzo di fantasia per credere a una come all'altra. invece sembra naturale, eccezionale ma scontato, che una donna possa guardare dentro con occhi cangianti, sappia cogliere l'essenza delle persone al di là della loro apparenza, sappia cercare per una vita la volontà del suo uomo a cui ha giurato di non guardare mai dentro. ed è quello, che conta. basterebbe imparare ad ascoltare davvero e a guardare davvero negli occhi, per trovare la volontà, quella nuvola chiusa che si trova alla bocca dello stomaco.
Mattias Appelgren
Att betyget bara blir 3 beror egentligen mer på mig som läsare än själva boken. Det är en bok som kräver sin tid och sin läsare, jag gjorde misstaget att dra ut läsandet över för lång tid och fick flera gånger svårt att hitta tillbaka in i boken.

Det är onekligen en helt svindlande berättelse, målad i långa vindlande meningar. Kärlekshistorian mellan Baltasar och Blimunda står i centrum, samtidigt som boken ger en makalöst detaljerad och initierad bild av livet på 1700-talet i Portugal. Från dom Att betyget bara blir 3 beror egentligen mer på mig som läsare än själva boken. Det är en bok som kräver sin tid och sin läsare, jag gjorde misstaget att dra ut läsandet över för lång tid och fick flera gånger svårt att hitta tillbaka in i boken.

Det är onekligen en helt svindlande berättelse, målad i långa vindlande meningar. Kärlekshistorian mellan Baltasar och Blimunda står i centrum, samtidigt som boken ger en makalöst detaljerad och initierad bild av livet på 1700-talet i Portugal. Från dom lägsta arbetarna slit med att bygga kloster och upp till kungen och prästernas storslagna ritualer. Det finns hur mycket beröm som helst att ge här, boken är fantasifull, humoristisk, storslagen och skriven av en författare med en helt enastående eget språk. Och när jag väl fastnar i den, är det en makalös bok. Men som sagt, tyvärr ger jag inte riktigt boken den koncentration som jag känner att den förtjänar. Min förlust, antar jag.
Catarina
Este foi o primeiro livros que li do autor e de certeza que não será último.
A verdade é que me surpreendeu pelas inesperadas reviravoltas associadas à história que me deixaram completamente "agarrada" ao livro. Apesar de todas as peripécias e o tom irónico espetacular, no início, não foi fácil compreender a história. Contudo, depois de reler em voz alta, acabei por ler perceber. Assim, depois de umas páginas, passei a ler com fluidez.
Mas passando à história... Bem, é difícil de qualificar. Sem Este foi o primeiro livros que li do autor e de certeza que não será último.
A verdade é que me surpreendeu pelas inesperadas reviravoltas associadas à história que me deixaram completamente "agarrada" ao livro. Apesar de todas as peripécias e o tom irónico espetacular, no início, não foi fácil compreender a história. Contudo, depois de reler em voz alta, acabei por ler perceber. Assim, depois de umas páginas, passei a ler com fluidez.
Mas passando à história... Bem, é difícil de qualificar. Sem dúvida que me prendeu sendo que o fim foi estrondoso. Não esperava que me deixasse a pensar tanto e com desejo que a história dos dois continuasse. É, ainda, de salientar o espanto com que descobri quem é o narrador.
No fundo, tanto a história como a escrita são arrebatadoras. Só me resta dizer que ADOREI!!!
Leave Feeback for Baltasar and Blimunda
Useful Links