At the Earth's Core

Written by: Edgar Rice Burroughs

At the Earth's Core Book Cover
This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs - Delphi Classics (Illustrated)’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Edgar Rice Burroughs’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. The Delphi Classics edition of Burroughs includes original annotations and illustrations relating to the life and works of the author, as well as individual tables of contents, allowing you to navigate eBooks quickly and easily.eBook features:* The complete unabridged text of ‘At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs - Delphi Classics (Illustrated)’* Beautifully illustrated with images related to Burroughs’s works* Individual contents table, allowing easy navigation around the eBook* Excellent formatting of the textPlease visit www.delphiclassics.com to learn more about our wide range of titles
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At the Earths Core Reviews

Patrick Gibson
Catching up on a book I should have read when I was a teen. Damn entertaining -- you know it is so.
Leila P
Olipas sujuva ja vauhdikas seikkailukirja, tämän luki nopeasti. Päähenkilö David oli tosin aika ärsyttävän täydellinen sankari joka jaksaa kehua itseään vähän väliä. Onton maapallon teoria oli myös aika huvittava, sekä se että sankarimme kadottaa ajantajunsa täysin koska Pellucidarissa vallitsee ikuinen keskipäivä. Minusta kyllä ihmisen pitäisi erottaa edes suurinpiirtein onko kulunut pari tuntia vai pari viikkoa...

Joistain asioista huomasi kyllä että tämä on kirjoitettu jo 1920-luvulla, esim. Olipas sujuva ja vauhdikas seikkailukirja, tämän luki nopeasti. Päähenkilö David oli tosin aika ärsyttävän täydellinen sankari joka jaksaa kehua itseään vähän väliä. Onton maapallon teoria oli myös aika huvittava, sekä se että sankarimme kadottaa ajantajunsa täysin koska Pellucidarissa vallitsee ikuinen keskipäivä. Minusta kyllä ihmisen pitäisi erottaa edes suurinpiirtein onko kulunut pari tuntia vai pari viikkoa...

Joistain asioista huomasi kyllä että tämä on kirjoitettu jo 1920-luvulla, esim. naiskuvasta ja siitä että David ja Perry asettavat ilman tunnontuskia päämääräkseen ihmisiä orjuuttavien mahar-liskojen tuhoamisen viimeiseen naaraaseen (ne lisääntyvät iljettävästi ilman uroksia)
Cristina Caladia
En el centro de la tierra, la primera de Pelúcidar, es una novela de aventuras entretenida e imaginativa que te deja con ganas de más.
Con un lenguaje sencillo y sin recrearse, o distraerse, en nada que no sea importante, Burroughs nos conduce por la acción y los problemas que se va encontrando el protagonista.

Los personajes rezuman el marco de la época. Son los creadores de los estereotipos actuales, hay que tener en cuenta que esta novela, publicada en serial, es de 1914, ahí es nada. David es En el centro de la tierra, la primera de Pelúcidar, es una novela de aventuras entretenida e imaginativa que te deja con ganas de más.
Con un lenguaje sencillo y sin recrearse, o distraerse, en nada que no sea importante, Burroughs nos conduce por la acción y los problemas que se va encontrando el protagonista.

Los personajes rezuman el marco de la época. Son los creadores de los estereotipos actuales, hay que tener en cuenta que esta novela, publicada en serial, es de 1914, ahí es nada. David es el héroe, y algunas reseñas le han criticado por no ser carismático como sus homólogos, Tarzán o Carter. Es cierto que no tiene mucha personalidad, al menos característica, pero es que hay una diferencia muy elemental: esta saga no se llama David Innes, se llama Pelúcidar, y es ese centro de la Tierra el verdadero protagonista de la acción y de la narración, es el centro de la historia, nunca mejor dicho.

El final, final, es un cliffhanger absoluto que te deja mordiendo el libro e implorando más.

Reseña completa: http://nomegustanlosnumeros.blogspot....
Brokedown Palace :: Ravelstein :: To Jerusalem and Back :: The Best American Essays 1988 :: Live from New York: An Oral History of Saturday Night Live
Erik Graff
In concept, this was my favorite of the Burrough's series. Like the John Carter books, David Innes also saves girls, fights monsters and becomes a hero, but his other world, the inner earth, is not so far away as Carter's Barsoom and he gets there using technology. Besides, as a regular reader of Fate Magazine throughout most of junior high, I had heard about Cmd. Peary and his discovery of the entrance to the hollow earth.
Jorge Mario
Aventuras y entretenimiento. Buen inicio de la saga Pelúcidar.

Julesmarie
I was introduced to Burroughs's Mars series in college, and I'm glad I read those first. If I'd found this series first I might not have given any others a try.

This wasn't the fun, over-the-top fantastical romp that I'd come to expect. It was incredibly graphic in the violence/torture.

And maybe it's because I grew up with Star Trek and their Prime Directive, but I just couldn't be comfortable with the idea of (view spoiler)[discovering a primitive society living inside Earth, and deciding to ma I was introduced to Burroughs's Mars series in college, and I'm glad I read those first. If I'd found this series first I might not have given any others a try.

This wasn't the fun, over-the-top fantastical romp that I'd come to expect. It was incredibly graphic in the violence/torture.

And maybe it's because I grew up with Star Trek and their Prime Directive, but I just couldn't be comfortable with the idea of (view spoiler)[discovering a primitive society living inside Earth, and deciding to make yourself their emperor and provide them with all of the weapons and technology necessary to make themselves the dominant species. (hide spoiler)]

The idea was still intriguing, it just wasn't executed the way I'd come to expect from this author.

Some Favorite Quotes:
the armor of blissful and stupendous ignorance

I turned to Perry to suggest that it might be wise to seek other surroundings--the idea had evidently occurred to Perry previously, for he was already a hundred paces away, and with each second his prodigious bounds increased the distance.

time ceases to be a factor the moment means for measuring it cease to exist.

"Lips may lie, but when the heart speaks through the eyes it tells only the truth."
Joe Kilmartin
I read this last week at the beach. It was by the dude that wrote Tarzan. It was about 2 dudes drilling into the earth and finding a hollow earth where the sun is replaced with a molten core. Which means it never turns night and the horizon goes upwards instead of downwards since the place curves in. It was some pulpy adventure non sense but the guy wrote action scenes pretty well and had decent world building. There seemed to be alot of stuff that Planet of the Apes later had. I heard they made I read this last week at the beach. It was by the dude that wrote Tarzan. It was about 2 dudes drilling into the earth and finding a hollow earth where the sun is replaced with a molten core. Which means it never turns night and the horizon goes upwards instead of downwards since the place curves in. It was some pulpy adventure non sense but the guy wrote action scenes pretty well and had decent world building. There seemed to be alot of stuff that Planet of the Apes later had. I heard they made a movie so bad of this that its on the new Mystery Science season. This was a good pulpy adventure story worth checking out.
Dan Regan
This was a fun read for me because I had initially saw the movie on Mystery Science Theater 3000. It's also my first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel. I wanted something that was a fun adventure and started with this because a favorite author of mine recommended this particular series.
The book was a whole lot better than the movie. It's fast paced and action driven and I can hardly wait to get my hands on the second volume. The story is over 100 years old which made it all the more interesting to me. This was a fun read for me because I had initially saw the movie on Mystery Science Theater 3000. It's also my first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel. I wanted something that was a fun adventure and started with this because a favorite author of mine recommended this particular series.
The book was a whole lot better than the movie. It's fast paced and action driven and I can hardly wait to get my hands on the second volume. The story is over 100 years old which made it all the more interesting to me. There was a lot of outdated words and ideas some of them now very offensive.
Christopher
An interesting, but extremely dated tale. It reads as though Burroughs originally intended to mock Verne, but then wanted to mock the sciences and religions of the world. It is well written, but after over 100 years since it's original publication, it has little else to offer.
Darren
Very average adventure story with strange races/creatures in land within earth. Mercifully short, so 2.5 Stars, rounding up to 3 only cos of fond memories of cheesy 70s film with Doug McClure and Peter Cushing.
Ian Hamilton
This was probably a wondrous read in 1914, but unfortunately it doesn't hold up with time. Imaginative nonetheless.
Paul McNamee
Definitely one of ERB's more consistent efforts. Enjoyed it a lot, looking forward to the sequel.
James Spears
I like the story, but I prefer Tarzan and John Carter of Mars. The story was weak in some places. Overall it had a quality of a b science fiction movie.
Limopilot
Good journey to the center of the earth with an unknown civilization right beneath our feet.
Ryan
I give it a 3.5 I enjoyed it, you can tell is was written in a different time as he uses ways of talking of race and relations between the sexes that would not be considered normal in our time.
Kirk Dobihal
Hard to finish and when I did was wondering at it's end whaaa. Took me 2 1/2 months to get through this and my mission to read the entire Burroughs collection has been truly tested.
Ex Libris
I suppose this might be entertaining for the lobotomized, but the insult to common sense was so evident from the first excruciatingly stupid chapter, (wherein our Heroes somehow manage to not be baked alive in temperatures that reach 153 degrees Fahrenheit in the glorified tin can they are boring through the earth's crust with) that I was in physical pain throughout my entire reading experience. The sheer amount of logic defying exploits made it impossible to focus on the story. This was definit I suppose this might be entertaining for the lobotomized, but the insult to common sense was so evident from the first excruciatingly stupid chapter, (wherein our Heroes somehow manage to not be baked alive in temperatures that reach 153 degrees Fahrenheit in the glorified tin can they are boring through the earth's crust with) that I was in physical pain throughout my entire reading experience. The sheer amount of logic defying exploits made it impossible to focus on the story. This was definitely not in the vein of other science fiction classics.
Drew
I'd started this about a year ago, read about a quarter of it, then sort of gave up on it.

Then for some reason about a week ago I picked it up again and started powering through it, and I'm glad I did.

Burroughs follows his usual formula here: modern man ends up in a primitive setting, fights a lot of monsters, and kills a lot of bad guys. And honestly the monster-fighting does take up a bit too much of the story, but what really draws you in is the world-building.

Abner Perry has invented a pr I'd started this about a year ago, read about a quarter of it, then sort of gave up on it.

Then for some reason about a week ago I picked it up again and started powering through it, and I'm glad I did.

Burroughs follows his usual formula here: modern man ends up in a primitive setting, fights a lot of monsters, and kills a lot of bad guys. And honestly the monster-fighting does take up a bit too much of the story, but what really draws you in is the world-building.

Abner Perry has invented a prospecting machine -- an "iron mole" to tunnel deep within the earth. He invites David Innes along on its maiden voyage. Both are surprised when, after traveling 500 miles, the prospector pops out of the ground into sunlight again.

Thinking that the prospector has somehow turned and gone back to the surface, Perry and Innes try to determine where they have arrived, but are set upon by prehistoric creatures and captured and enslaved by primitive ape-like humanoids.

They soon determine that they are on the interior surface of earth, which turns out to be hollow. Instead of a molten core, a miniature sun hangs in the center of the sphere, casting eternal daylight. What humans thrive here are slaves to a ruling race of flying lizard creatures and their ape-like soldiers.

There isn't a great deal of plot. Escaping his captors, Innes explores this strange interior world, learns of its geography and various peoples, finds love (of course!), and attempts to foment rebellion.

Burroughs plays with some interesting ideas, such as how one measures time in a world where the sun never sets. Or how one determines directions when the sun is at a fixed point, there are no stars, nor poles.

There are tantalizing pieces of information introduced here, but never thoroughly explored, and much is left unresolved by the open-ended conclusion. Obviously, this is all a ploy to get you to read the next book in the series. It will have worked. I have the next book queued up and ready to go.
Alan Bligh
The adoration of the primitive, edwardian-vs-pre-historic sexual politics, the moral superiority of the colonial impulse and the occasional ripping fight scene, psychic pterodactyls, mole machines and time as a solely perceptual concept -what was once science fiction rendered to complete fantasy the years; oh how the world has changed since this was written.

The style is to any modern reader very stilted, and there was clearly a two-for-one sale on deus ex machina regards the plot, but despite a The adoration of the primitive, edwardian-vs-pre-historic sexual politics, the moral superiority of the colonial impulse and the occasional ripping fight scene, psychic pterodactyls, mole machines and time as a solely perceptual concept -what was once science fiction rendered to complete fantasy the years; oh how the world has changed since this was written.

The style is to any modern reader very stilted, and there was clearly a two-for-one sale on deus ex machina regards the plot, but despite all this there are some generally effecting moments and some excellent world building here, and as his reputation suggests, ERB really does know how to construct a fight scene to the extent he was the writer that struck the mold from which a hundred action cliche's have since been endlessly repeated. Though having read this (or re-read this as I think i did read it before when I was maybe eleven or twelve)I will agree with what appears to be a general consensus that is sits in the middle tier of ERB's work, quality wise, I will say they're is still a lot of good in this one, and well worth reading or any fan of pulp adventure or looking to read something from the dawn off heroic fantasy lit. With the caveat of course, that it is very much a work of its time.
Daniel Shellenbarger
In this, the first of Burroughs' Pellucidar books, Burroughs encounters Connecticut native David Innes while hunting lions in the Sahara and the latter tells him about his adventures tunneling to a prehistoric timeless world formed by the underside of the Earth's crust (the Earth being hollow, with a small sun in the middle). The story follows the general pattern of Burroughs' books, hero arrives in new world and is beset by monsters, hero encounters beautiful native girl and falls in love, hero In this, the first of Burroughs' Pellucidar books, Burroughs encounters Connecticut native David Innes while hunting lions in the Sahara and the latter tells him about his adventures tunneling to a prehistoric timeless world formed by the underside of the Earth's crust (the Earth being hollow, with a small sun in the middle). The story follows the general pattern of Burroughs' books, hero arrives in new world and is beset by monsters, hero encounters beautiful native girl and falls in love, hero encounters all-powerful intelligent overlord race (non-human in this case) and is forced to take up arms, hero ends up cut off from his beloved due to a cruel twist of fate, mysterious cliffhanger ending to cue next serial. It's a shame too, because while his plots are (frankly) embarrassingly repetitive and his racial attitudes can (at best) be considered typical of his time, Burroughs is actually an entertaining and imaginative writer (especially with regards to his settings) with a fair sense of humor. On the whole, At the Earth's Core has some fascinating world building, but it's never quite as interesting as A Princess of Mars or The Land that Time Forgot.
Cory Howell
The last time I read At the Earth's Core, I think I was thirteen or fourteen years old. So it was a lovely nostalgia trip to read it again at the age of 41. And I read it on my new e-reader, of all things, a device which would have seemed incredibly futuristic to my teenage self!
Really, it was a good read, although I am now more sensitive to some of the more cornball aspects of Burroughs' writing. The overly florid language occasionally brought a smile to my face, and (view spoiler)[...

...when I The last time I read At the Earth's Core, I think I was thirteen or fourteen years old. So it was a lovely nostalgia trip to read it again at the age of 41. And I read it on my new e-reader, of all things, a device which would have seemed incredibly futuristic to my teenage self!
Really, it was a good read, although I am now more sensitive to some of the more cornball aspects of Burroughs' writing. The overly florid language occasionally brought a smile to my face, and (view spoiler)[...

...when Innes travels back to the earth's surface, and it takes him a day longer than it had to get to Pellucidar, I almost laughed out loud! I mean, he almost suffocated on the first journey; wouldn't he have completely run out of air on the return voyage, if it was so much longer? Oh well, those kind of details never seemed to bother ERB, and in a sense, I guess they're part of the simplistic charm of his adventure novels.

Since so many of ERB's books are public domain now, I shall probably be rereading quite a few of them, since they are available for free download to my e-reader. Not a bad way to pass the time. (hide spoiler)]
Eric
Pulp adventure with a scifi twist that's interesting enough to be worth reading. The earth is hollow. Gravity works. There's a central sun that stays in place. There's even an inner-orbiting "moon" that constantly shadows one region. Many different races of various intelligence, with lots of huge beasts from long ago. A protagonist who starts building empire to put the various peoples together, while falling in love with a rather modern cave girl. It's mostly a rollicking adventure story with sh Pulp adventure with a scifi twist that's interesting enough to be worth reading. The earth is hollow. Gravity works. There's a central sun that stays in place. There's even an inner-orbiting "moon" that constantly shadows one region. Many different races of various intelligence, with lots of huge beasts from long ago. A protagonist who starts building empire to put the various peoples together, while falling in love with a rather modern cave girl. It's mostly a rollicking adventure story with shallow characters, but it's worth reading for a while so long as you don't move your lips.

I remember it being a lot more fun when I was younger and read it the first time. Perhaps I've read much better since and have come to expect better. But then, I had the same reaction to a second reading of Heinlein.
Diz
This book is definitely a product of its time. The hero of the book, along with an engineer friend, go on an adventure to drill into the earth. They lose control of the drilling machine and end up in a strange world on the inside of the earth's crust. This hero quickly takes it upon himself to save this world from itself. The hero is presented as perfect in every way, overcomes obstacles through luck and coincidence, and experiences no development to his character. Additionally, the hero express This book is definitely a product of its time. The hero of the book, along with an engineer friend, go on an adventure to drill into the earth. They lose control of the drilling machine and end up in a strange world on the inside of the earth's crust. This hero quickly takes it upon himself to save this world from itself. The hero is presented as perfect in every way, overcomes obstacles through luck and coincidence, and experiences no development to his character. Additionally, the hero expresses outdated ideas about women and native peoples, so it can be a bit uncomfortable to read at times.

On the plus side, there are a few scenes that do a good job of combining a sense of wonder and horror. Particularly, the scene that the hero witnesses at an ancient temple. However, these scenes are few and far between.
Todd Martin
At the Earth’s Core is the first book in the Edgar Rice Burroughs' series of Journey to the Center of the Earth style books. The story centers around the protagonist David Innes and his trusty, inventive, elder side-kick Perry who drill 500 miles beneath the Earth’s surface to find a hollow, inner world (called Pellucidar) populated by cavemen and prehistoric creatures and other silly crap.

As you might expect, the book is pure pulp, featuring a wildly unbelievable plot whose only purpose is to c At the Earth’s Core is the first book in the Edgar Rice Burroughs' series of Journey to the Center of the Earth style books. The story centers around the protagonist David Innes and his trusty, inventive, elder side-kick Perry who drill 500 miles beneath the Earth’s surface to find a hollow, inner world (called Pellucidar) populated by cavemen and prehistoric creatures and other silly crap.

As you might expect, the book is pure pulp, featuring a wildly unbelievable plot whose only purpose is to connect a series of action sequences. Although it’s far from high literature, I found the book sort of fun, campy and quaint in a cheesy, turn of the century, radio-drama kind of way.
Hazel
This story was okay, a bit old fashioned in style, as is understandable. The story was also pretty plain and common. Of course it may have been the first of its kind. the science is a bit wonky, and in an overyourhead fashion so that you won't see that it is so wonky. The primitive natives are just as intelligent as modern man, but slightly less knowledgeable. The characters pick up languages with extraordinary rapidity, even considering the 10 year time span. There are 4 groups of sentient crea This story was okay, a bit old fashioned in style, as is understandable. The story was also pretty plain and common. Of course it may have been the first of its kind. the science is a bit wonky, and in an overyourhead fashion so that you won't see that it is so wonky. The primitive natives are just as intelligent as modern man, but slightly less knowledgeable. The characters pick up languages with extraordinary rapidity, even considering the 10 year time span. There are 4 groups of sentient creatures which seems rather strange. Especially since three of them are primates. Still, there is some good content there, and if I were more into adventure Stories I'm sure I would have gotten past some of these small flaws and quite enjoyed the story.
Matthew Antosh
This book was simply okay. It felt like an introduction to a bigger whole while at the same time feeling a bit rushed. That's either good writing (making the reader feel like there is no time like in Pellucider) or lazy.

The part I felt most frustrating was how quick our heroes jump to conclusions or learned things. There was no exploration and development. It was "where are we?" "Must be the centre of the earth!" I would have liked to see the characters trying and failing to communicate with th This book was simply okay. It felt like an introduction to a bigger whole while at the same time feeling a bit rushed. That's either good writing (making the reader feel like there is no time like in Pellucider) or lazy.

The part I felt most frustrating was how quick our heroes jump to conclusions or learned things. There was no exploration and development. It was "where are we?" "Must be the centre of the earth!" I would have liked to see the characters trying and failing to communicate with the native cave people rather then a quick sentence that was like "finally I was taught their language" and then everyone is speaking in the lords perfect English.

Still I love the setting and the characters introduced and I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
Stuart
This is my first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel (somehow I missed his stuff as a child--I liked Ray Bradbury's take on Mars more I think).

At the Earth's Core is unabashedly American in the jumbo-chili-cheese-fries-iest possibly way. From the alternation of piety and profanity, to the notion that murdering a few Mahars would be murder to excitement (in literally the next paragraph) at the notion of genociding the entire race of Mahars to the goal, by the end of the book, of ruling over the entire inn This is my first Edgar Rice Burroughs novel (somehow I missed his stuff as a child--I liked Ray Bradbury's take on Mars more I think).

At the Earth's Core is unabashedly American in the jumbo-chili-cheese-fries-iest possibly way. From the alternation of piety and profanity, to the notion that murdering a few Mahars would be murder to excitement (in literally the next paragraph) at the notion of genociding the entire race of Mahars to the goal, by the end of the book, of ruling over the entire inner world as an emperor and god, the whole thing is the American Spirit personified in serialized, hypersaturated colors. Bonus points for all the racism and sexism too.
Chris Maguire
I thoroughly enjoyed this historic science fiction. The story is a little heavy on fantastic events and the hero was comically heroic, but the wealth of ideas and creativity was superb. Burroughs, even in the early '20s writes convincing scientific theories to support his imaginative ideas. (Our ideas about gravity may seem comical even with whatever the next breakthrough is.) Burroughs seemed to be long on ideas and short on time as he packed in enough ideas for a five-book series into one book I thoroughly enjoyed this historic science fiction. The story is a little heavy on fantastic events and the hero was comically heroic, but the wealth of ideas and creativity was superb. Burroughs, even in the early '20s writes convincing scientific theories to support his imaginative ideas. (Our ideas about gravity may seem comical even with whatever the next breakthrough is.) Burroughs seemed to be long on ideas and short on time as he packed in enough ideas for a five-book series into one book: interesting races, fantastic creatures, time relativity, etc.
B. Reese
Basically a rehash of the same formula from "Princess of Mars" except it is set on in the center of the hollow Earth (Pellucidar).

Even so, it's a great adventure told in a land untouched by time, literally, and as absurd as the idea of a hollow earth is, this story is believable and full of thrills.

Since Burroughs stole his own formula, it ends basically the same as "Princess". Really, the main draw to this story is the peripheral characters and the change in setting. Check it out if you need Basically a rehash of the same formula from "Princess of Mars" except it is set on in the center of the hollow Earth (Pellucidar).

Even so, it's a great adventure told in a land untouched by time, literally, and as absurd as the idea of a hollow earth is, this story is believable and full of thrills.

Since Burroughs stole his own formula, it ends basically the same as "Princess". Really, the main draw to this story is the peripheral characters and the change in setting. Check it out if you need more Barsoom style yarns, but need a break from Barsoom.
Wechselbalg
I really liked it! As a fan of the author I expected to dig the wonderous world of Pellucidar and I wasn't disappointed.
My favourite parts were the action scenes, Edgar Rice Burroughs has a great way of telling about combat and danger.
The only thing I found a little irritating - but really just a minor sidenote - was how very quickly David and Perry learned both new languages. Even with Pellucidar's weird lack of time it felt a little bit too easy.
But overall, I loved the book and will start the I really liked it! As a fan of the author I expected to dig the wonderous world of Pellucidar and I wasn't disappointed.
My favourite parts were the action scenes, Edgar Rice Burroughs has a great way of telling about combat and danger.
The only thing I found a little irritating - but really just a minor sidenote - was how very quickly David and Perry learned both new languages. Even with Pellucidar's weird lack of time it felt a little bit too easy.
But overall, I loved the book and will start the next volume right away.
Michael Sypes
Straight forward, old fashioned pulp sci-fi. Turn off your brain, suspend disbelief, and enter Pellucidar where the men are virile, the damsels in distress, and the beasts savage. Fun fodder for 1960's B-pictures. I must admit to having been impressed by some aspects of the book's science, particularly how the horizon looks on a concave, rather than convex surface. Overall, a really fun, fast romp.
Megan
This is a fine, old sf-fantasy story by an author known for writing exactly that. I could write a review breaking down the book based on views of race, gender, science issues, but I think maybe that is all beside the point. I'll just say our hero is every inch the American winner. If you are a sf/fantasy fan you probably owe it to yourself and the genre to read a little Burroughs, just like you'll read Verne and Asimov, because they inspire so many contemporary authors.
Phil Jones
It has been many a year since I last read this book or any other Burroughs book for that matter, but cheap collections on kindle allow me to revisit books I loved as a child.

The story is shorter than I remember and his style more simplistic than I remember but he packs a lot into a few pages.

Good simple story telling full of imagination.

Sure the science is silly but he is a product of the early 20th century and can be forgiven.

Now onto Pellucidar.
Sam Bright
This book was part of a clue in a crossword puzzle - it sounded interesting, so I read it online. Pretty quick read - by the author of Tarzan. Kind of a zany story about discovering a savage cave-man/dinosaur world ruled by evil lizard-men at the center of the earth. It was pretty fierce... yeah, fierce is a good way to describe it. I enjoyed the awkward romancing of a cavewoman (Dian the Beautiful); I didn't enjoy the savage brutaliy of the lizard-men.
Pkelsay
A quick book to read, with the typical sexist perspective which I tend to find endearing in Burroughs books; I find it as quaint and silly as most of the science in them, and that amuses me. The end was a bit abrupt and I haven't yet looked to see if it was followed by a sequel, but hope it has been. I read it on an e-reader during midnight feelings and was able to keep the simple plot straight despite the broken-up reading.
Andrew
I've read a few Edgar Rice Burroughs stories now and think this might be the one I enjoyed the most. Considering when it was written it is very accessible. I was, of course, familiar with the film. I have fond childhood memories of it. I think I prefer the book over the film, partly because the ending in the book is much more satisfying than that used for the film. If you're looking for a little bit of historical fantasy why not give this a go?
Richard
To review a novel such as this, you need to figure out how much slack to cut it for it having been written in 1914. I confess this is the first Burroughs novel I've read, and I'll read a few more. But I never felt the main character was in any danger, despite the fact (or maybe because)it was as if he was on a merry-go-round of goofy monsters. The characters, of course, are cartoonish. But if this is the kind of mindless trip you feel like going on, it's OK. Not a threat to Jules Verne.
Carter
At the earths core is the First book in the pellucider series. This science fiction book features two main characters David Innes and Perry.(last name not said.)the book is told in first person from David's point of view. The book deserves ( in my opinion) at least two stars. It's one of those books that once you start reading you just can't put it down.
Rodney
Having read both the Mars and Venus series, I had a pretty good idea what I was in for, and ERB didn't disappoint. Similar character types, similar plots, similar themes, etc. That said, for relatively easy reads read purely for entertainment's sake, these books serve their purpose. I'll keep reading. I imagine I'll finish this series quickly, and move onto the Tarzan series in short order!
Daniel Butcher
Being a big John Carter fan j was really hopeful. Yes this does follow the romantic adventure pattern in the Carter books but I found myself never liking the characters and j did not care what happened to them.

The idea of a land without time is interesting. But Burroughs continues to use time language to describe the action.

Overall very disappointed.
Geoffrey Escandon
Listened to the audio recording while driving through the AZ desert. It was a hoot to know that the seeds of "Land of the Lost" were planted so long ago! In addition to the very familiar storyline, the language was also a kick, sounding like 90% of the words needed for a college entrance exam. Nobody speaks or writes like that anymore. He used "hither and thither" twice in the same chapter.
SheaN
A ridiculous adventure story that left me really wanting to get to the sequel as soon as possible. I mean the main character falls in love with a cave-woman at the center of the earth (that somehow has its own stationary sun...) and has to leave to bring back guns to the primitive people! Fucking crazy.
Brent
With plot development at an abrupt, break-neck speed there is no space in this book to get bored. Spectacular situations and creatures totally paying homage to Verne's 'Journey'. I was saddened when the initial book ended so quickly.
Ray
This is a very good episodic reading, emphasizing Burroughs' cliff-hanger chapter endings. 15 episodes, approx. 1/2 hour each available at http://www.marsbooks.libsyn.com/ along with Tarzan and The Return of Tarzan.
The first five Mars books are available for a small fee.
Kristy
Edgar Rice Burroughs may be an acquired taste, but I sure think he's fun. In this adventure, our hero bores to the center of the earth only to find an entire civilization, complete with dinosaurs and scary prehistoric monsters! Luckily there is also a super beautiful lady down there...
Gio
Incredibly inventive tale. After reading the jacket, I thought it was going to be stupid, but Burroughs has a way on convincing, drawing you in, and although you know what's destined to happen, you're with him every step of the way, loving it.
Peter
Despite many flaws, a fun read with tons of adolescent adventure, preconceived notions of women and minorities and the typical pulp novel rush to an ending. I'll continue reading this classic series until I either finish it or lose interest.
Joe
A creative imagination at work. This novel probably influenced later science fiction that explored the world below the earth's surface. The plot, however, seemed awfully similar to that found in the author's Barsoom (Mars) series, so I give the book only three stars.
Tim
A very nice adventure story. As with all adventure stories there are copious amounts of luck and a few unlikely scenarios, but Burroughs certainly has a good imagination and has put together an interesting world.
Rick English
The writing was very matter of fact and the characters were pretty dull but I'm more forgiving of early sci/fi-fantasy.
Evan
This book is very good, but not very realistic.
Elar
Very easy adventure story to listen. Some ideas, concepts and mannerisms seems outdated, but they do not bother too much.
Bar
I don't even know how I ran into this book but it was quite entertaining.
Charles Wilson
My favorite Burroughs series, outlandish and satirical.
A.B. Shepherd
Didn't finish this one. Only read about half way. Although I am impressed at the imagination and the writing for it's time period, it just didn't hold my interest.
Elizabeth
Kind of like a mish-mash-mush up of journey to the center of the earth and the time machine. Entertaining enough, but a bit cliche and predictable.
Ivan Pito
Imajinasi yang liar. Saya baru tahu kalau novel ini memiliki sekuelnya.
Frans Karlsson
An adventure where David and Perry manages to travel to Pellucidar. A whole world that exist within earth. Fast paced and predictable but fun reading.
Julia
First book in the series. I love these early science fiction novels! I listened to this as a free download from LibriVox.org.
Derk
I read so much Edgar Rice Burroughs I practically flunked out of college, this was one of the better ones
Tracy
These characters built a machine that they could ride in while drilling down to the center of the earth where a whole new world awaits with people and all kinds of monsters.
Patrick
Good to read for learning the roots of science fiction.
Cary Enlow
read it as a kid. Recently found it on the Gutenberg project. Price was right (free)
Michael
I actually listened to the Librivox audio book read by Mark Nelson.
https://librivox.org/at-the-earths-co...
Donna Sanders
Decided it was time to read some classics on my ever growing list. I enjoyed this story very much. Liked how it left Davids fate up in the air... I nice touch.
Cassi
I'm not sure this book has held up that well over the past century. It was almost laughable, in fact, I did laugh quite a bit. Probably not at parts I was supposed to...
Breena
Throughly enjoyed the story. Can't wait to read the next book.Reminds me of Journey to the Center of the Earth -but an entire civilization added on.
Benjamin Chandler
A revisit of a book I'd adored at the age of 13. It was just as fun to read now as then, and more imaginative than I remembered.
Micah Grant
A fun read of a simpler time. Some pretty good inventions to keep the story moving along.
Catherine
It's a good read. Goes pretty quickly as most of his stories do.
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