The Knowledge of the Holy

Written by: A.W. Tozer

The Knowledge of the Holy Book Cover
The Knowledge of the Holy by popular evangelical author and Christian mystic A.W. Tozer illuminates God’s attributes—from wisdom, to grace, to mercy—and in doing so, attempts to restore the majesty and wonder of God in the hearts and minds of all Christians. A modern classic of Christian testimony and devotion, The Knowledge of the Holy shows us how we can rejuvenate our prayer life, meditate more reverently, understand God more deeply, and experience God’s presence in our daily lives. 
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The Knowledge of the Holy Reviews

Megan Lane
I've read this one before, but this is a classic. And a worthy one. I loved it just as much as I did the first time. Many highlights, many sticky note tabs to mark loved sections. Gonna loan it to a fellow counselor who is gonna try to read it this summer.
Christopher M.
A fantastic overview of the attributes of God. Biblically sound, eloquent, concise, and readable, Tozer manages to hit on the major attributes of God (though, we could probably find many more to add) while not getting too carried away into philosophic proofs and rabbit trails. He assumes that the truth in the book will only be understood by the person already possessing faith, so while he does go to lengths to describe the person of faith, especially toward the end, he does not belabor the point A fantastic overview of the attributes of God. Biblically sound, eloquent, concise, and readable, Tozer manages to hit on the major attributes of God (though, we could probably find many more to add) while not getting too carried away into philosophic proofs and rabbit trails. He assumes that the truth in the book will only be understood by the person already possessing faith, so while he does go to lengths to describe the person of faith, especially toward the end, he does not belabor the point, for that is not the purpose of the book. Tozer leaves the reader with a challenge to actively seek out and acquaint himself with the God of the Bible. He argues well that only through such an acquaintance can a person of faith be empowered to live rightly before God and with others. My one critique of the book is that it ought to be read along with another book or some biblical passages which illustrate the instances in which God willfully simplifies himself and puts aside certain of his attributes in fulfillment of others--most notably in the incarnation, but also throughout redemptive history for the purpose of self-revelation to his creatures.
Eric
This is a must read for all Bible study teachers. Much easier to understand (more compelling and more persuasive) than God Without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God's Absoluteness by James E. Dolezal. Covers the same ground, more or less, but A. W. Tozer refers directly to the self-revealed God of the Bible and not to Aquinian metaphysics. The book was written now 60 years ago, and observes the church bringing God down to human experience and understanding. That trend has only This is a must read for all Bible study teachers. Much easier to understand (more compelling and more persuasive) than God Without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God's Absoluteness by James E. Dolezal. Covers the same ground, more or less, but A. W. Tozer refers directly to the self-revealed God of the Bible and not to Aquinian metaphysics. The book was written now 60 years ago, and observes the church bringing God down to human experience and understanding. That trend has only accelerated as we have remade God in our image. A return to reverence for the Holy will not "save America" but it would contribute to a reform of the true Church.
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Olivia
This is a little book, but not one to read quickly! Yet this book is a delight to slowly go through and really think over. The beginning shows why it is so important to know God, the body explains a different attribute of God in each chapter, and the end speaks of how each individual can deepen their knowledge of the Holy. Time and again I was blown away by Tozer's thoughts on not only what Scripture says God is like, but also on what it means that He has that attribute, and what that means in l This is a little book, but not one to read quickly! Yet this book is a delight to slowly go through and really think over. The beginning shows why it is so important to know God, the body explains a different attribute of God in each chapter, and the end speaks of how each individual can deepen their knowledge of the Holy. Time and again I was blown away by Tozer's thoughts on not only what Scripture says God is like, but also on what it means that He has that attribute, and what that means in light of the Gospel. My love for and security in my infinite and unchanging God has increased, and the fact that He is infinite and unchanging has become incredibly precious to me. I recommend this book to anyone longing for a deeper relationship with the Lord!
Phillip Nash
I have always thought of Tozer as a prophetic speaker and writer because in his generation the seeds of the fruit he warned against we now harvest in our own. His book on the knowledge of God's attributes is one of the best summaries around and not only sets out clearly for us a lost conception of God but does so with beautiful language.
Andy Anderson
If you are a skeptic who is really seeking truth, read it.
If you are a average Christian who needs to grow, read it.
If you want to know more on the thoughts of who God is, read it.
If you want to have a springboard for the attributes of God, read it.
Con
Tozer enlightened me to view Jesus truly as God. Very inspirational and changed the depth of my worship.
Jacqueline
This should be mandatory reading for, like, everybody. :)
Danny Gatson
Finished this for the second time. One of the most transforming books I have ever read.
Janice Dick
This little book, which I've had in my library for many years but never read, has become an inspiration to me as a Christian who wishes to grow. In the book, Tozer explores "The Attributes of God: Their Meaning in the Christian Life."

Chapters include discussion on God's Infinitude, Wisdom, Omnipotence, Faithfulness, Goodness, Justice, Mercy, and many more, set forth with the idea that these attributes are not separate parts, or entities that stand on their own, but that altogether, they form a This little book, which I've had in my library for many years but never read, has become an inspiration to me as a Christian who wishes to grow. In the book, Tozer explores "The Attributes of God: Their Meaning in the Christian Life."

Chapters include discussion on God's Infinitude, Wisdom, Omnipotence, Faithfulness, Goodness, Justice, Mercy, and many more, set forth with the idea that these attributes are not separate parts, or entities that stand on their own, but that altogether, they form a picture of God as He has chosen to reveal Himself to us through Scripture. (The Scriptures Tozer uses to illustrate his points are listed at the back of the book.)

The last chapter offers, as the title suggests, the Open Secret of how to grow Christ's body, the church: Acquaint thyself with God. It must "begin with the individual." Only as we acquaint and re-acquaint (read: lose some of our preconceived and sometimes false ideas of who He is) ourselves with God will we be able to properly represent Him here, and serve Him as we should.
Davi Saro
This was such a good book. It starts powerfully and ends powerfully. The last two chapters were fantastic. Tozer addresses the lukewarmness of the church and it sounds like he is writing today. Then, to my amazement, I find out this book was first published in 1961! His writing is so relevant to us in 2017.

The last chapter states the purpose of this book: "the most critical need of this hour may well be that the Church should be brought back from her long Babylonian captivity and the name of God This was such a good book. It starts powerfully and ends powerfully. The last two chapters were fantastic. Tozer addresses the lukewarmness of the church and it sounds like he is writing today. Then, to my amazement, I find out this book was first published in 1961! His writing is so relevant to us in 2017.

The last chapter states the purpose of this book: "the most critical need of this hour may well be that the Church should be brought back from her long Babylonian captivity and the name of God be glorified in her again as of old." Bam! That's what I mean. Each page seems to have a quotable paragraph. My copy is thoroughly marked up and scribbled.

From the reading of this book, I gather that Tozer holds to a "Big God Theology". That is what is sorely missing in evangelical churches today.
Aaron Downs
A. W. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy explores the nature of God evidenced in his attributes to help Christians better know and love God. This small book encourages Christians to rightly know an incomprehensible God who has displayed his nature in his attributes.

First, Tozer explains why Christians must think about God correctly. He says, “what comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us” (1). What a person believes about God structures that person’s worl A. W. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy explores the nature of God evidenced in his attributes to help Christians better know and love God. This small book encourages Christians to rightly know an incomprehensible God who has displayed his nature in his attributes.

First, Tozer explains why Christians must think about God correctly. He says, “what comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us” (1). What a person believes about God structures that person’s worldview in a way that nothing else can. Nothing is more fundamental to the essence of a person because people are made in the image of God; therefore, “without doubt, the mightiest thought the mind can entertain is the thought of God, and the weightiest word in any language is its word for God” (2). A person’s or a nation’s concept of God will control every moral decision made by that person or nation, whether or not the moral being is aware of the connection.

Wherever there is sin or immorality of any kind, there is a wrong view of God. Tozer asserts, “I believe there is scarcely an error in doctrine or a failure in applying Christian ethics that cannot be traced finally to imperfect and ignoble thoughts about God” (2). This book seeks to correct wrong thinking about God so that errors in both doctrine and application of Christian ethics may be corrected. Tozer’s call is clear, the church’s call is “to purify and elevate her concept of God until it is once more worthy of Him—and her. In all her prayers and labors this should have first place” (4). Christians must think about God correctly if they are to live correctly.

Second, Tozer explains that God is incomprehensible. He says that children, philosophers, and religionists all have the same question—What is God like? Although he attempts to answer that question with this book, he admits that the book cannot fully answer that question; in fact, no one can answer that question fully. God lies beyond our intellectual capacities because he is far different than all things and people, despite the fact that man was made in his image.

People have the uncanny ability to bring God into man’s image, simply because man was made in God’s image, Tozer explains. “ Bringing an unseen reality into the imagination is difficult, especially when the thing being imagined will never fully be comprehended. When we try to image what God is like we must of necessity use that-which-is-not-God as the raw material for our minds to work on” (8). As the mind works on this materiel it must be careful to avoid creating a god that differs from the true God incomprehensible. To do so it to create an idol; and for Christians to worship idols is to give their hearts to something other than the true God. Knowing God requires spiritual discernment.

This task of trying to comprehend God ends in failure, ultimately. But Christians must pursue this task. Why? Because Christian’s cannot avoid it. “The yearning to know What cannot be known, to comprehend the Incomprehensible, to touch and taste the Unapproachable,” says Tozer, “arises from the image of God in the nature of man” (9). God’s image in man demands that man yearns and strives to know God. How? Through the person of Jesus Christ. It is “in Christ and by Christ, God effect complete self-disclosure, although He shows Himself not to reason but to faith and love” (9). People come to know and love God in the person of Jesus Christ.

Third, Tozer examines several of God’s attributes. He makes note that there is no set number of God’s attributes; each book seems to have different numbers of attributes for God. However, that is not a problem, because God is one and because all of His attributes work together. The approach that he takes to each attribute is that “we shall not seek to understand in order that we may believe, but to believe in order that we may understand” (59). This brief study on God’s attributes proves to be beneficial in understanding both God’s transcendent qualities and God’s immanent qualities. After discussing the attributes he notes that mere study cannot give someone knowledge of God. This knowledge does not come through natural human understanding, but through spiritual understanding. This makes knowing God “at once the easiest and the most difficult thing in the world” (115). Tozer’s paradigm of knowing God is to forsake sin, commit to Christ in faith, rest positioned in Christ’s death, practice meditating on God’s majesty, and to serve fellow men by sharing the knowledge of God with others.

Although this book is short and easy to read, it’s depth does not really allow for a hurried reader to benefit much from it. I appreciated the order in which Tozer lays out the book: beginning with an argument for why people need to know God and then describing God and how to know him. This book helped me refine aspects of the most important thing about me—what I think about God.

He points out that “One cannot read the Scriptures sympathetically without noticing the radical disparity between the outlook of men of the Bible and that of modern men . . . Where the sacred writers saw God, we see the laws of nature.” This book effectively describes God and teaches about God in a way that closes the gap between the outlook of Biblical authors and of modern men by clearly and biblically picturing God.
This book has helped me in private reading, and I think that it would also prove helpful to read in group settings to teach to others as foundational lessons on the nature of God. This book has already helped me in preparing lessons on the attributes of God for church, and I am sure that I will reference it again in the future. The authors that he referenced helped me know of others who have written thoughtfully about knowing and loving God. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy proved to be thoughtful and insightful.
Aaron Downs
A. W. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy explores the nature of God evidenced in his attributes to help Christians better know and love God. This small book encourages Christians to rightly know an incomprehensible God who has displayed his nature in his attributes.

First, Tozer explains why Christians must think about God correctly. He says, “what comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us” (1). What a person believes about God structures that person’s worl A. W. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy explores the nature of God evidenced in his attributes to help Christians better know and love God. This small book encourages Christians to rightly know an incomprehensible God who has displayed his nature in his attributes.

First, Tozer explains why Christians must think about God correctly. He says, “what comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us” (1). What a person believes about God structures that person’s worldview in a way that nothing else can. Nothing is more fundamental to the essence of a person because people are made in the image of God; therefore, “without doubt, the mightiest thought the mind can entertain is the thought of God, and the weightiest word in any language is its word for God” (2). A person’s or a nation’s concept of God will control every moral decision made by that person or nation, whether or not the moral being is aware of the connection.

Wherever there is sin or immorality of any kind, there is a wrong view of God. Tozer asserts, “I believe there is scarcely an error in doctrine or a failure in applying Christian ethics that cannot be traced finally to imperfect and ignoble thoughts about God” (2). This book seeks to correct wrong thinking about God so that errors in both doctrine and application of Christian ethics may be corrected. Tozer’s call is clear, the church’s call is “to purify and elevate her concept of God until it is once more worthy of Him—and her. In all her prayers and labors this should have first place” (4). Christians must think about God correctly if they are to live correctly.

Second, Tozer explains that God is incomprehensible. He says that children, philosophers, and religionists all have the same question—What is God like? Although he attempts to answer that question with this book, he admits that the book cannot fully answer that question; in fact, no one can answer that question fully. God lies beyond our intellectual capacities because he is far different than all things and people, despite the fact that man was made in his image.

People have the uncanny ability to bring God into man’s image, simply because man was made in God’s image, Tozer explains. “ Bringing an unseen reality into the imagination is difficult, especially when the thing being imagined will never fully be comprehended. When we try to image what God is like we must of necessity use that-which-is-not-God as the raw material for our minds to work on” (8). As the mind works on this materiel it must be careful to avoid creating a god that differs from the true God incomprehensible. To do so it to create an idol; and for Christians to worship idols is to give their hearts to something other than the true God. Knowing God requires spiritual discernment.

This task of trying to comprehend God ends in failure, ultimately. But Christians must pursue this task. Why? Because Christian’s cannot avoid it. “The yearning to know What cannot be known, to comprehend the Incomprehensible, to touch and taste the Unapproachable,” says Tozer, “arises from the image of God in the nature of man” (9). God’s image in man demands that man yearns and strives to know God. How? Through the person of Jesus Christ. It is “in Christ and by Christ, God effect complete self-disclosure, although He shows Himself not to reason but to faith and love” (9). People come to know and love God in the person of Jesus Christ.

Third, Tozer examines several of God’s attributes. He makes note that there is no set number of God’s attributes; each book seems to have different numbers of attributes for God. However, that is not a problem, because God is one and because all of His attributes work together. The approach that he takes to each attribute is that “we shall not seek to understand in order that we may believe, but to believe in order that we may understand” (59). This brief study on God’s attributes proves to be beneficial in understanding both God’s transcendent qualities and God’s immanent qualities. After discussing the attributes he notes that mere study cannot give someone knowledge of God. This knowledge does not come through natural human understanding, but through spiritual understanding. This makes knowing God “at once the easiest and the most difficult thing in the world” (115). Tozer’s paradigm of knowing God is to forsake sin, commit to Christ in faith, rest positioned in Christ’s death, practice meditating on God’s majesty, and to serve fellow men by sharing the knowledge of God with others.

Although this book is short and easy to read, it’s depth does not really allow for a hurried reader to benefit much from it. I appreciated the order in which Tozer lays out the book: beginning with an argument for why people need to know God and then describing God and how to know him. This book helped me refine aspects of the most important thing about me—what I think about God.

He points out that “One cannot read the Scriptures sympathetically without noticing the radical disparity between the outlook of men of the Bible and that of modern men . . . Where the sacred writers saw God, we see the laws of nature.” This book effectively describes God and teaches about God in a way that closes the gap between the outlook of Biblical authors and of modern men by clearly and biblically picturing God.
This book has helped me in private reading, and I think that it would also prove helpful to read in group settings to teach to others as foundational lessons on the nature of God. This book has already helped me in preparing lessons on the attributes of God for church, and I am sure that I will reference it again in the future. The authors that he referenced helped me know of others who have written thoughtfully about knowing and loving God. Tozer’s The Knowledge of the Holy proved to be thoughtful and insightful.
Joseph Simmonds
A very simple, yet powerful and thought-provoking book. Every chapter discusses, fleshes out and examines a different attribute of God's character, and does it an a very biblical and respectful way.
It is also an important book, for as Tozer says at the beginning of it,

"What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us. The history of mankind will probably show that no people has ever risen above its religion, and man's spiritual history will demonstrate tha A very simple, yet powerful and thought-provoking book. Every chapter discusses, fleshes out and examines a different attribute of God's character, and does it an a very biblical and respectful way.
It is also an important book, for as Tozer says at the beginning of it,

"What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us. The history of mankind will probably show that no people has ever risen above its religion, and man's spiritual history will demonstrate that no religion has ever been greater than it's idea of God."
Robynn
I started this so long ago, I started over and read it in 3 days. Don't remember why I bought it in the first place. A simple book musing on the aspects of God and a warning about how a puny understanding of God leads to a puny church and weak disciples. I agree with the premise so no hardship in being reminded.
Kristy
This is one of the best nonfiction books I've ever read. It's Christian mysticism delving into the supernatural brings a profound sense of wonder and holy fear. It widened my eyes to how small we make God. Tozer is older, so the more difficult, "older" English can't be helped. Other than that, it's a profound book.
Norma Kimbrough
A new look at how we see our God. This book is a good beginning on a renewed walk with God the Father. There is a new meaning if you look and think on who God always is-He never changes, but we should and can.
Read the book for a perfect understanding of who God is and how much he loves his children, and how He wants us close to Him.
Forrest
Classic Book by Pastor Tozer from the middle of the 20th Century. Very deep spiritually (have to read some sections twice), yet still written for the common person.

Because of the biblical truth here, beware it may change your life. The famous quote by Tozer from this book is, “What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us.”
Jacob Cavett
Solid overview of the attributes of God. Tozer very much accomplishes his goal of illuminating both the commonly accepted attributes of God as well as the uncommon, yet effectively describes how these qualities work together in perfect unity. Some claims could have been presented with harder evidence, but excellent theology overall.
Pat
This is an amazing, life changing, reverent perspective on the very nature of God as He has revealed Himself to us. A small book with amazing power; in reading a 5-page chapter before bed, I then sit in wonder. One of the best books on God I’ve ever read.
Alastair
This is one of the best books on God I have read. The book has many short chapters (a few pages each) which all give a powerful explainations of God's nature from his Word.

If you were to read one book on God's nature this year, I'd start with this!
Stephanie C
Tozer's voice wasn't my favorite but I have about a page and a half of amazing quotes that made the book quite worthwhile to me. Overall I was reminded content-wise of the writings of St. Augustine, but I enjoy his manner of expressing himself more than Tozer's.
Catherine Winkelman
I loved this book! It challenged and broadened by perspective of God in a beautiful way. A couple times near the end it felt a bit repetitive, but that is probably more a reflection of myself instead of the book.
Abby Herche
This book is so small but it has a huge message and importance in anyone’s walk as a Christian. There is so much insight into the trinity and the roles that each member plays. Definitely one to be read over and over. I use it for reference often.
Jackie Eason
This was my first Tozer book, and I definitely want to read another one now. God is high and lifted up yet wants us to know him in the most personal way. I recommend reading this if you enjoyed None Like Him by Jen Wilken (someone recommended me to do so).
Paul Van buren
I will be reading this one a number of times. I purposefully took my time with this small book due the largeness of what it contained. It is best consumed in small bights and a willingness to think way out of the current box. Enjoy!
Melissa Leanza
Wonderful book

If you want to really know God, this is a wonderful companion to Scripture. It gave me a better understanding who the God of the Bible truly is vs. what passes for god in so many circles today.
Hyacinth
A.W. Tozer is one of the classic writers. His language is Old English and can be intimidating to someone new to the faith. The book is small but loaded. As I read, I felt the awesomeness of God. He is hallowed and reverence. I was very moved by the language...it may be because I was raised on the King james version of the Bible so the language did not intimidate me. I felt like it was just me and the Lord as I read. I will be reading more of Tozer's work.
Emily Perrine
Tozer's high view of God radiates through his words as he shows his readers His glorious attributes, while emphasizing the importance of having a strong biblical view of God.
Chris Ehrhart
Excellent. A must read for believers. Quick chapters and excellent dive in the attributes of God.
Naomi
I looooved reading this!! Such a profound book and one I would want to read on a regular basis.
Trevor Schmidt
One of the best books to answer the question "Who is God?" Or "What is God like?" Amazing book.
Tia
This is by far one of the greatest books I've read about the attributes of God.
Josh
Fantastically profound. Chapters are surprisingly short for how much he covers. A must read for any Christian.
Charlie Jung
Such a dense read albeit a read that I thoroughly enjoyed, definitely deserves a couple more read throughs. More of an experience of anything I’ve ever read before.
Tad Hoven
One of the best books on understand a Holy and perfect God from a human perspective. A must read if you are trying to understand God.
Frances
Excellent book on the attributes of God. The writing is quite formal. This book was written in 1960.
Mathew Reames
This book gives amazing insight into the nature of God and His Holiness.
Isaiah
This book took me forever to read. However the insights found inside its pages are invaluable.
Becky Willey
Deep read. Need to be savored. Really good about describing the majesty and attributes of God!
Blake
A wonderful, God exalting, book that really encouraged the worship of the Lord in my heart and mind.
Nadia Rivas
Excelente libro sobre los atributos de Dios. Me gustó mucho la forma de escribir del autor.
Nate Weis
Excellent book. A spiritual classic. I can see myself reading this several more times.
R. Fox
Beautiful writing and deep theological insight
Andy Tate
One of the best books I have read. Unpacks attributes of God in brief bite size tidbits. Great for discussion groups for people who don’t like to read 20-40 pages a week
Heather Richmond
This was a fantastic study for this summer. We paired it with Behold Your God by Myrna Alexander! Our God is a great God!
Natalya
Tozer's work is incredibly important in breaking up common presuppositions of God. It challenges the reader to think of what The Deity of God really means.
Tom
I have now added this book to the required reading list for the Christian life.
Claire
I really like it because is an amazing book!!
Phil
Tozer here is fantastic as he paints a picture of a "big God." It is "theology preached." Highly recommended to new believers.
Megan Craig
I do NOT feel adequate to give a review of this book. But that's why I read it - because I knew it was theologically beyond me a little bit and I wanted to stretch myself. I know I didn't catch close to everything Tozer was saying here, but I came away with a high view of God's perfection, holiness, justice, and love. It has informed my thoughts on scripture and shaped my internal dialogue throughout the day. He says, "Worship is pure or base as the worshiper entertains high or low thoughts of G I do NOT feel adequate to give a review of this book. But that's why I read it - because I knew it was theologically beyond me a little bit and I wanted to stretch myself. I know I didn't catch close to everything Tozer was saying here, but I came away with a high view of God's perfection, holiness, justice, and love. It has informed my thoughts on scripture and shaped my internal dialogue throughout the day. He says, "Worship is pure or base as the worshiper entertains high or low thoughts of God." I'm grateful for Tozer bringing my worship of Jesus just a bit higher. I look forward to reading this multiple more times.
Carlyn Cole
A classic of our Christian faith. Who is God? Tozer's answer is fully biblical, faithful, and leaves one with a hunger to know the sovereign creator of the universe.
Danny Nathan
Somewhat difficult to trudge through a cover to cover read, but loaded with blistering insights. Glad I read it, but it will likely prove more useful to keep around as a sort of reference/textbook/dictionary regarding the attributes of God.
Jo
Want to know something horrible? I have never been able to touch my toes without bending my knees. Here I am, a mere twenty years of age, and I am utterly inflexible. Do you know that feeling, when you try to do the whole touch-your-toes move, and your muscles just say, “Ooooh no, under no circumstances are we going any farther than this.” One summer I decided (it being my deepest desire to touch my toes) that I was going to stretch my leg muscles every night until I could do it. It worked. A li Want to know something horrible? I have never been able to touch my toes without bending my knees. Here I am, a mere twenty years of age, and I am utterly inflexible. Do you know that feeling, when you try to do the whole touch-your-toes move, and your muscles just say, “Ooooh no, under no circumstances are we going any farther than this.” One summer I decided (it being my deepest desire to touch my toes) that I was going to stretch my leg muscles every night until I could do it. It worked. A little. It would have worked even better had I bothered to do it for more than a week. Desire only takes you so far without discipline.

So, the whole touch-your-toes thing. That is something akin to the feeling I get when I try to comprehend God. I know, I know, it’s a dumb analogy. But my mind only goes so far, and then it stops. And let me tell you, it has a tendency to think of God on a lot smaller scale than he actually is (which is only understandable, since he is infinite). Now I realize that God uses a lot of things to stretch our knowledge of him; life experience, relationships, the Holy Spirit and his word, to name a few. But does he use guys like Tozer? I think maybe so. Because every once in a while reading Tozer, he would just blow the boundaries of my mind a little. (We’ll just leave that pronoun deliberately ambiguous.)

Tozer never claims that his words can impart an understanding of God. In fact, half of his chapters (each one on a different characteristic of God’s) end by saying how much beyond our comprehension all of this is. In his chapter on God’s love, I think he expresses a sentiment that goes for the rest of the book as well. He says, “I can no more do justice to that awesome and wonder-filled theme than a child can grasp a star. Still, by reaching toward the star the child may call attention to it and even indicate the direction one must look to see it. So, as I stretch my heart toward the high, shining love of God, someone who has not before known about it may be encouraged to look up and have hope.” He works to bring us along just a little more in our understanding, and in that I think he succeeds.

This book could easily be used devotionally. The chapters are short enough to read and meditate on one every day, perhaps alongside a time of Bible study and prayer.

In the final chapter of Tozer’s book, he lists several conditions that must be met in order to receive the knowledge of God. Among these, he says, “Fifth, we must practice the art of long and loving meditation upon the majesty of God. This will take some effort, for the concept of majesty has all but disappeared from the human race. The focal point of man’s interest is now himself. Humanism in its various forms has displaced theology as the key to the understanding of life. When the nineteenth-century poet wrote, ‘Glory to Man in the highest! for man is the master of things,’ he gave to the modern world its new Te Deum. All this must be reversed by a deliberate act of the will and kept so by a patient effort of the mind.”

Discipline, my friend. Can I recommend, for one, that you read a little Tozer?
Paul Wichert
I think Tozer has correctly diagnosed one condition of modern Christianity as, "simply not producing the kind of Christian who can appreciate or experience the life in the Spirit." (p.6) But I have mixed thoughts about this book. On the one hand: Tozer is such a great example of devotion put into words -- his encouragement to see God, through his attributes, as majestic, high and exalted is much needed and appreciated. He also tries to combine his lofty devotional language with doctrine, occasio I think Tozer has correctly diagnosed one condition of modern Christianity as, "simply not producing the kind of Christian who can appreciate or experience the life in the Spirit." (p.6) But I have mixed thoughts about this book. On the one hand: Tozer is such a great example of devotion put into words -- his encouragement to see God, through his attributes, as majestic, high and exalted is much needed and appreciated. He also tries to combine his lofty devotional language with doctrine, occasionally referring to Scripture, so there is some balance there for the most part. I like how he begins each of the 23 short chapters on God's attributes with a prayer and ends with a poem or hymn.

On the other hand: Tozer proceeds from a perspective of mysticism, often quoting a variety of the RC mystics, rather than developing the attributes from Scripture methodically. I got the sense that Scripture was just an aside for him. So although he incorporates doctrine into his thoughts of devotion, I found the chapters uneven. At some points he includes classic reformed doctrines such as the pactum salutis (p.30) and continuity of the convenant of grace (p.102), but the chapter on God's sovereignty was very disappointing as was his concluding chapter on the conditions for and practice of gaining knowledge of God. The dissonance of quoting Meister Eckhart and Miguel de Molinos next to Isaac Watts and Martin Luther was disquieting to say the least. In true mystical style, statements were often made without support or context.

The study of God and his attributes should lead us to lofty majestic thoughts, but I think must proceed carefully from the whole counsel of Scripture, by the illumination of the Spirit. This book is perhaps the froth of that study - good for cultivating an attitude of praise and devotion to God, but must be supplemented by some more substantial works such as The Attributes of God (by A.W. Pink) or The Existence and Attributes of God (by Stephen Charnock) -- or, preferably, a solid systematic theology. If it's true that, "what comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us," (p.9) then we must look to the revealed truth of God in the Scriptures. I think this book could be helpful for reversing "the loss of the concept of majesty from the popular religious mind," (p.6) but you must read discerningly and supplement. [based on the 1961 edition, Harper and Row]
Joe
The chapters of this book each address an individual attribute of God. Tozer says that the attributes are all one although they're treated separately. He makes sure to address their relation to one another and how they compose the whole. We sometimes take for granted the terms (and the actual outpouring of) the grace of God or the mercy of God, but this book help gives a proper understanding of these and all attributes.

Some of my favorite quotes:

"What God declares the believing heart confesses w The chapters of this book each address an individual attribute of God. Tozer says that the attributes are all one although they're treated separately. He makes sure to address their relation to one another and how they compose the whole. We sometimes take for granted the terms (and the actual outpouring of) the grace of God or the mercy of God, but this book help gives a proper understanding of these and all attributes.

Some of my favorite quotes:

"What God declares the believing heart confesses without the need of further proof. Indeed, to seek proof is to admit doubt, and to obtain proof is to render faith superfluous. Everyone who possesses the gift of faith will recognize the wisdom of those daring words of one of the early Church fathers: 'I believe that Christ died for me because it is incredible; I believe that He rose from the dead because it is impossible.'"

"Reflection upon revealed truth naturally follows the advent of faith, but faith comes first to the hearing ear, not to the cogitating mind."

"Need is a creature-word and cannot be spoken of the Creator." ... "Again we must reverse the familiar flow of our thoughts and try to understand that which is unique, that which stands alone as being true in this situation and nowhere else."

"God cannot change for the better. Since He is perfectly holy, He has never been less holy than He is now and can never be holier than He is and has always been. Neither can God change for the worse. Any deterioration within the unspeakably holy nature of God is impossible. Indeed I believe it impossible even to think of such a thing, for the moment we attempt to do so, the object about which we are thinking is no longer God but something else and someone less than He. The one of whom we are thinking may be a great and awesome creature, but because he is a creature he cannot be the self-existent Creator."

"The vague and tenuous hope that God is too kind to punish the ungodly has become a deadly opiate for the consciences of millions."

"God's holiness is not simply the best we know infinitely bettered. We know nothing like the divine holiness. It stands apart, unique, unapproachable, incomprehensible and unattainable. The natural man is blind to it. He may fear God's power and admire His wisdom, but His holiness he cannot even imagine."
Alex
What an incredible work of wonder and awe at the awesome majesty of the Most High! The object is infinite, being God himself, and the scope is boundless, being his attributes, but Tozer approaches the subject in a way that is reverent, concise, and biblical. His aim is to bring the church back to a lofty concept of God and a profound consciousness of his presence. The premise of the book is that "the most portentous fact about any man is not what he at a given time may say or do, but what he in What an incredible work of wonder and awe at the awesome majesty of the Most High! The object is infinite, being God himself, and the scope is boundless, being his attributes, but Tozer approaches the subject in a way that is reverent, concise, and biblical. His aim is to bring the church back to a lofty concept of God and a profound consciousness of his presence. The premise of the book is that "the most portentous fact about any man is not what he at a given time may say or do, but what he in his deep heart conceives God to be like." In order to have right ideas about God we must rightly understand his attributes as they are made known to us in his self-revelation through creation, the prophets, the scriptures, and his Son, Jesus Christ. I think the most significant theological contribution Tozer makes is his emphasis on the essential oneness of all the attributes. He shows that "all of God's acts are consistent with all of His attributes," embracing the paradox that where God shows mercy he must also be just, where he shows love and grace he is also holy and righteous. God is a unitary being and he is truth, and faith is choosing to believe everything he says about himself. Another thing I love about this book is that the chapters are short, perfect for devotional reading.

The only thing that gave me pause about this book is that most of the quotes the author uses are from Catholic mystics such as Michael de Molinos, Julian of Norwich, and Nicholas of Cusa (look them up, you may be surprised). Pay attention to these quotes and read with discernment. Tozer is clear: "I bring no esoteric cryptogram, no mystic code to be painfully deciphered. I appeal to no hidden law of the unconscious, no occult knowledge meant only for the few." Besides the questionable quotes, his gospel message throughout is clear, consistent, and biblically sound: Jesus is Redeemer and Lord and King, we are commanded to repent and called to salvation by grace through faith. A deep, satisfying, intimate, and everlasting relationship with the God of the universe is the reward of all who heed this call.
Craig
Wow. I could not put this book down! Tozer does an absolutely amazing job of describing the awesomeness of God. Like most great men of Christianity in the last millennium, he is extremely humble in spirit when he gives his descriptions, a rightfully contrite attitude that is necessary when contemplating the great things of The Holy One. In fact, I think it is his attitude that shows through the pages which helps to make this book so powerful. To view oneself in comparison to the almighty God to Wow. I could not put this book down! Tozer does an absolutely amazing job of describing the awesomeness of God. Like most great men of Christianity in the last millennium, he is extremely humble in spirit when he gives his descriptions, a rightfully contrite attitude that is necessary when contemplating the great things of The Holy One. In fact, I think it is his attitude that shows through the pages which helps to make this book so powerful. To view oneself in comparison to the almighty God to view oneself as practically nothing, deserving of destruction, and yet, in the image of God, wholly dependent on Him, we can do anything through Him. Descriptive metaphors and a unique perspective give a wonderful voice to something that is, at its core, literally indescribable.

It has always been difficult for me to understand the meaning of the "fear of the Lord", but after reading The Knowledge of the Holy, I have a much better grasp on what exactly that means. The God of everything is so vastly, uncomprehendingly superior to even our wildest imaginations, that there is nothing else in this world that we should be afraid of in comparison to the awesome power of the Lord. Who else is there that has any power of their own apart from God? All are contingent. None are independent. None truly have anything apart from what our Lord grants.

Tozer makes a good case about today's society losing a proper mindset about God, and the consequences of such a mistake. He then goes on to list, in a very eloquent way, the attributes of God. A previous review of this book gave it low marks on the fundamental mistake that may seem apparent in the text: trying to describe the indescribable. But I think that even to try is to bring yourself into a proper context compared to God and will help remind of you of the incredible Lord that we serve. To not try, well, won't do you any good at all.
Greg
The back of the book declares that The Knowledge of the Holy: The Attributes of God: Their Meaning in the Christian Life is a classic. As such, I read this with high expectations that were not really met. Tozer attempts to educate about the unknowable aspects of the Divine. There is nothing too much that I find objectionable, but there is not much new ground here that goes beyond other great mystical theologians either. Tozer attempts to make right the drifting of understanding in modern churche The back of the book declares that The Knowledge of the Holy: The Attributes of God: Their Meaning in the Christian Life is a classic. As such, I read this with high expectations that were not really met. Tozer attempts to educate about the unknowable aspects of the Divine. There is nothing too much that I find objectionable, but there is not much new ground here that goes beyond other great mystical theologians either. Tozer attempts to make right the drifting of understanding in modern churches away from a correct understanding on the conception of God. He declares that God is righteous, faithful, all-knowing, and majestic. He declares that God, while creating the Natural world, cannot be known through knowledge of the natural world, as he is beyond it and therefore beyond man’s understanding. That is a simple enough premise, but one that Tozer does not really support in arguments. To Tozer, these are presented as essential elements of faith.

Tozer is certainly earnest in his approach. He deeply believes and that comes through in his writing, and his humble supplications to start each chapter. In the end, however, Tozer’s writings seem like an echo of the great modern evangelists like Billy Graham, but somehow lacking the simple awe that those evangelists can invoke in readers and listeners. I don’t believe Tozer’s approach would appeal to those readers who need some basis of logic or reason in which to form their faith...Tozer would seem to imply this is a fool’s errand. Unfortunately for him, there are many good examples of where this approach does work. This book does not resonate with me, but I cannot discount that it has resonated with others and stood the test of time.

See my other reviews here!
Russell Izzo
Tozer takes some of the theological attributes of God and puts them in their natural context: a context of beauty and worship. This book is a work of art! The short easy chapters are a great devotional to kick off or end your day in awe of our Creator. Do not pass up this book!
Grace
You will find in Tozer's work solid nutrition for your heart, mind and soul. There is all meat and no milk here.

These are the kinds of thoughts that you can chew on:

"Secularism, materialism, and the intrusive presence of things have put out the light in our souls and turned us into a generation of zombies. We cover our deep ignorance with words, but we are ashamed to wonder, we are afraid to whisper 'mystery'". (The Holy Trinity).

"We are today suffering from a secularized mentality. Where the s You will find in Tozer's work solid nutrition for your heart, mind and soul. There is all meat and no milk here.

These are the kinds of thoughts that you can chew on:

"Secularism, materialism, and the intrusive presence of things have put out the light in our souls and turned us into a generation of zombies. We cover our deep ignorance with words, but we are ashamed to wonder, we are afraid to whisper 'mystery'". (The Holy Trinity).

"We are today suffering from a secularized mentality. Where the sacred writers saw God, we see the laws of nature. Their world was fully populated; ours is all but empty. Their world was alive and personal; ours is impersonal and dead. God ruled their world; ours is ruled by the laws of nature and we are always removed from the presence of God.". (The Omnipotence of God)

My favorite chapter was "The Grace of God" where Tozer dispels the common idea that the Old Testament is the book of law and the New Testament is the book of grace. He says, "The truth is quite otherwise...Grace indeed came by Jesus Christ, but it did not wait for His birth in the manger or His death on the cross before it became operative. Christ is the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world."

The importance of this slim volume came to the foreground when I was discussing open theism with my young adult son. There are so many ideas that are popular today that need a good dose of proper theology about who God is. Knowledge of the Holy offers just that. A. W. Tozer's classic opens one's mind to the character of God and leaves one in breathless wonder of His immensity yet His desire to reveal Himself to us.
Brian Manville
Too many Christian books today seem more like self-help books or devote themselves to beating up the Body for the things the Church is not doing. It is helpful - perhaps even imperative - that more Christians spend time reading books that are worshipful and insightful. A.W. Tozer seemingly wrote books like this with ease.

In The Knowledge of the Holy, Tozer goes through the many attributes of God, providing essays on those attributes and their importance in changing the attitudes of the believer Too many Christian books today seem more like self-help books or devote themselves to beating up the Body for the things the Church is not doing. It is helpful - perhaps even imperative - that more Christians spend time reading books that are worshipful and insightful. A.W. Tozer seemingly wrote books like this with ease.

In The Knowledge of the Holy, Tozer goes through the many attributes of God, providing essays on those attributes and their importance in changing the attitudes of the believer towards God. One can only imagine the time spent in prayer and meditation over these wonderful aspects of God's character. The benefit to the believer is that Tozer has given a road map for contemplation of the Almighty and His attributes.

Each chapter begins with a prayer, followed by Tozer lovingly inviting us to sup with the Father at His banquet, each course a hearty spiritual meal for the tired, hungry, and thirsty souls who crave greater meaning in their walk with the Father. The reading is not easy - nor should it be - for this discusses deep and weighty issues that challenge the believer beyond shallow platitudes and catchphrases.

Having read many of Tozer's works, I can assure you that you cannot read his work and not be profoundly touched by the time he spends on these matters. Wise men seek wise counsel, and many years after his passing, Tozer continues to influence Godly men and women who seek first the kingdom of righteousness.

BOTTOM LINE: A must-read for those who wish to deepen their faith as well as their understanding of God Almighty.
Eric Hoff
This very thought-provoking and worship-full little book by Tozer (always good for a profound read) was composed of short little chapters, each focusing on a different characteristic of God. Chock-full of scripture references and grounded theology I found each chapter bringing me to a deeper understanding of who God is. Some of the characteristics covered were omniscience, omnipotence, sovereignty, grace, mercy, love. But my favorite was on God's immutability - His inability to change. Therefore This very thought-provoking and worship-full little book by Tozer (always good for a profound read) was composed of short little chapters, each focusing on a different characteristic of God. Chock-full of scripture references and grounded theology I found each chapter bringing me to a deeper understanding of who God is. Some of the characteristics covered were omniscience, omnipotence, sovereignty, grace, mercy, love. But my favorite was on God's immutability - His inability to change. Therefore, he can only exude justice ALL the time. He's incapable of doing anything else. At the same time, He can also only be loving ALL the time. He can do nothing else but. And so on. I find that extremely comforting. We humans pick and choose when we want to be loving, when we want to be judgmental, when we want to be merciful. But God is ALWAYS fully loving, fully grace-full, fully all-knowing, etc. That's what makes Him Holy - set apart - and God alone. And us....NOT.

I was challenged by the final chapter called "The Open Secret" and talks about what we "must do" as Christians. It just sounded a bit overly "fundamentalist" to me. A tad legalistic. I don't know. Read it for yourself and see what you think. It's hard to "rate" a book with stars when it's non-fiction AND when it's truth about God. I mean, the book is excellently written. But, because of the last chapter, I'm giving it a 4 instead of a 5.

Overall, I was really blessed by the thoughts presented.
Justin Effler
As I sit here in reverence after reading this book, it is really hard to think of a book I would recommend to any believer (and nonbeliever too) outside of the bible, over this one.

This is my first A.W. Tozer book that I have read. However, this is far from the last. God has gifted Tozer with the ability to communicate vast and the complicated wisdom majesty and eternal wisdom of God.

The structure of the book is excellent. Simple, concise and very enjoyable. When most people read a book they typ As I sit here in reverence after reading this book, it is really hard to think of a book I would recommend to any believer (and nonbeliever too) outside of the bible, over this one.

This is my first A.W. Tozer book that I have read. However, this is far from the last. God has gifted Tozer with the ability to communicate vast and the complicated wisdom majesty and eternal wisdom of God.

The structure of the book is excellent. Simple, concise and very enjoyable. When most people read a book they typically find out how long each chapter is. What's great about this layout is each chapter, which is dedicated to an attribute of God, is that it ranges to no more than 7 pages. This allows the read to take breaks and following rather easily than being overloaded with information. What makes this even greater is that while each chapter is only 3-7 pages, it's filled with brilliant wisdom and insight into each attribute or characteristic of who God is.

This book should be read by every church; for as Tozer states in the concluding chapter (paraphrasing), we don't need to have any special knowledge or code to having a God fearing church but to teach our churches sound, gospel centered theology in our worship songs, preaching and devotion.

Dmreichle
This is a wonderful and concise book that gives us a glimpse into the nature of God. There is really no higher study than the study of God, and the very nature of God means that our study of Him will be severely limited by our own finite minds. But God has chosen to reveal Himself to us in some ways, so it is important that we take Him up on it, and learn all we can about our wonderful, majestic, unlimited God.

Tozer's description of the attributes of God as being who He is and what we know to b This is a wonderful and concise book that gives us a glimpse into the nature of God. There is really no higher study than the study of God, and the very nature of God means that our study of Him will be severely limited by our own finite minds. But God has chosen to reveal Himself to us in some ways, so it is important that we take Him up on it, and learn all we can about our wonderful, majestic, unlimited God.

Tozer's description of the attributes of God as being who He is and what we know to be true of Him was particularly helpful to me. They are not "possessions" of God as qualities; but they are how God is as He reveals Himself to His creatures. That God has harmony in His being, an absence of "parts", is foundational to understanding Him. Because we are finite, we break down these truths about God into attributes; but we cannot separate one from the other, since God is in perfect harmony with Himself.

This was a great book to read just following my reading of "Knowing God" by Packer. It is amazing that we can never know all there is to know and how different authors can present the same truths in different ways, providing another small level of understanding to the reader.
Erik
Allow me to be a little cheeky and use the star ratings as an indication of how hard is it to finish this book.

Not that this book is peppered with bombastic words, but rather the contents of each chapter cannot be simply glanced through without much thought being put into the ideas that A.W Tozer expounds within the confines of this small book.

Something that struck me was the author's claim that "church has lost her lofty concept of God". If this was written back in the 1950s-1960s, what does th Allow me to be a little cheeky and use the star ratings as an indication of how hard is it to finish this book.

Not that this book is peppered with bombastic words, but rather the contents of each chapter cannot be simply glanced through without much thought being put into the ideas that A.W Tozer expounds within the confines of this small book.

Something that struck me was the author's claim that "church has lost her lofty concept of God". If this was written back in the 1950s-1960s, what does that say about us Christians living the 21st century, where many more forms of distractions exist?

Digressing back to this book, many of us do have our notions/theories of the origins of God, but this book challenges that notion for reasons stated within the book.

Overall, this is the kind of book you might want to look into if you have an interest in being challenged or even stimulated by the arguments by the classic Christian authors such as Tozer himself.

What's recommended though is a discussion with someone else who is familiar with the contents of this book.

PS: By the time the review was written, this reviewer still had 2-3 more chapters to read before
finishing the book. :P
Sarah
I had seen and heard A. W. Tozer quotes quite often before reading this book. When the leader of the book study I'm in announced we were reading this book next, I was excited to learn what else this king of quotes had to say. We read Knowledge of the Holy as an effort to take a look at the character of God so that we may better know him and then better know his will for our lives and be better able to low forward on obedience.

There is so much we reduce and truncate about who God is, all of whic I had seen and heard A. W. Tozer quotes quite often before reading this book. When the leader of the book study I'm in announced we were reading this book next, I was excited to learn what else this king of quotes had to say. We read Knowledge of the Holy as an effort to take a look at the character of God so that we may better know him and then better know his will for our lives and be better able to low forward on obedience.

There is so much we reduce and truncate about who God is, all of which I am sure I am guilty of at some time or another. Tozer lays it out on short chapters addressing the different characteristics of God, although it is important to note that God cannot be one of these more than another - self-existing, self-sufficient, infinite, immutable, wise, omnipotent, divinely transcending, omnipresent, faithful, just, merciful, full of grace, loving, holy and sovereign. The Eternity of God (chapter 7), The Wisdom of God (chapter 11) and The Love of God (chapter 20) were a few of my favorite chapters.

Although it is a short book, it was not a quick read for me. I found myself rereading sentences, paragraphs and even pages because of the depth of what is discussed in these 117 pages.

A great book to read and discuss with others.
Eric Wright
Any book by A.W. Tozer is worth reading. I cannot say enough about the profit found from reading this book and seeking to digest the content. Each chapter, though short, summarizes in a powerful and mind-boggling way the greatness of God. Basically, the book is about the attributes of God, but described in deep and practical ways that we seldom find among Christian books.

Tozer has an amazing way of summarizing deep truths in concise ways that are often so challenging they bear re-reading again Any book by A.W. Tozer is worth reading. I cannot say enough about the profit found from reading this book and seeking to digest the content. Each chapter, though short, summarizes in a powerful and mind-boggling way the greatness of God. Basically, the book is about the attributes of God, but described in deep and practical ways that we seldom find among Christian books.

Tozer has an amazing way of summarizing deep truths in concise ways that are often so challenging they bear re-reading again and again.

I first picked up this book, probably 50 years ago and underlined key truths. Recently we reread it in our local book club. Each member commented on it value and the benefit that would be derived from reading a chapter a week through year.

It is biblical, theological, practical and readable. Not only does Tozer illuminate the attributes as far as Scripture allows but he also comments on the sad condition of the modern church which has so little sense of the glory and majesty of God. Truly we need a desperate return to preaching on and meditating the glories of God. The problems Tozer saw 60 years ago are even more prevalent today.
Matthew
Over the years, whenever I have asked leaders I look up to, what books I should read, "The Knowledge of the Holy" regularly comes up. And yet, for whatever reason, I never felt compelled to read it until now. After finally reading it, I am ashamed that I waited so long. It is an unbelievable book about the person and nature of God.

In the preface to the book, A.W. Tozer says these words: "The message of this book does not grow out of these times but it is appropriate to them. it is called forth b Over the years, whenever I have asked leaders I look up to, what books I should read, "The Knowledge of the Holy" regularly comes up. And yet, for whatever reason, I never felt compelled to read it until now. After finally reading it, I am ashamed that I waited so long. It is an unbelievable book about the person and nature of God.

In the preface to the book, A.W. Tozer says these words: "The message of this book does not grow out of these times but it is appropriate to them. it is called forth by a condition which has existed in the Church for some years and is steadily growing worse. I refer to the loss of the concept of majesty form the popular religious mind. The Church has surrendered her once lofty concept of God and has substituted for it one so low, so ignoble, as to be utterly unworthy of thinking, worshiping men. This she has done not deliberately, but little by little and without her knowledge; and her very unawareness only makes her situation all the more tragic."

There is so much more I could say about this book and so many takeaways from it, but you need to buy a copy of this and read it yourself!
Starla
Too many people dismiss the God of the Bible as a one- or two-dimensional entity who is distant and mystical, often angry and vindictive. A. W. Tozer dismisses this idea and describes Him as a God with many dimensions, attributes, personality, depth, and desires, and states that "What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us."

Tozer presents God as holy, righteous, omnipotent, and all-knowing, but also as one who is loving and good, gracious and personal a Too many people dismiss the God of the Bible as a one- or two-dimensional entity who is distant and mystical, often angry and vindictive. A. W. Tozer dismisses this idea and describes Him as a God with many dimensions, attributes, personality, depth, and desires, and states that "What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us."

Tozer presents God as holy, righteous, omnipotent, and all-knowing, but also as one who is loving and good, gracious and personal at the same time--- "The whole outlook of mankind might be changed if we could all believe that we dwell under a friendly sky and that the God of heaven, though exalted in power and majesty, is eager to be friends with us."

As he later states, "The greatness of God rouses fear within us, but His goodness encourages us not to be afraid of Him. To fear and not be afraid---that is the paradox of faith."

A great thinker and Biblically sound, Tozer helps us seek and know God fully, not just accept the common stereotype of who He is.
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