The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

Written by: Douglas Adams

The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul Book Cover
When a passenger check-in desk at London's Heathrow Airport disappears in a ball of orange flame, the explosion is deemed an act of God. But which god, wonders holistic detective Dirk Gently? What god would be hanging around Heathrow trying to catch the 3:37 to Oslo? And what has this to do with Dirk's latest--and late-- client, found only this morning with his head revolving atop the hit record "Hot Potato"? Amid the hostile attentions of a stray eagle and the trauma of a very dirty refrigerator, super-sleuth Dirk Gently will once again solve the mysteries of the universe...
feedback image
Total feedbacks: 70
18
32
19
1
0
Looking for The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul in PDF? Check out Scribid.com
Audiobook
Check out Audiobooks.com

The Long Dark TeaTime of the Soul Reviews

writegeist
How do you describe Adams' Dirk Gently books? I have a hard time not because they can't be genre-classified but because they don't fit any novel form out there. Stream-of-consciousness on the part of the author? Is Gently the main character? Who is the main character? What is going on? There's one thing going on, though--Adams does a lot of describing. It's a wealth of description. Plot? Pish-tosh! We don't need no stinking plot! That's not why you read an Adams novel anyway. So just let Adams m How do you describe Adams' Dirk Gently books? I have a hard time not because they can't be genre-classified but because they don't fit any novel form out there. Stream-of-consciousness on the part of the author? Is Gently the main character? Who is the main character? What is going on? There's one thing going on, though--Adams does a lot of describing. It's a wealth of description. Plot? Pish-tosh! We don't need no stinking plot! That's not why you read an Adams novel anyway. So just let Adams mess with your mind. But if you aren't acquainted with his work, read the first two novels in the Hitchhiker's Guide series first, then come in for a landing on the first Dirk Gently novel. You'll thank me.
Thom
Read this book when it first came out. Great storyline - truly holistic and connected. Dialogue is excellent, and even the minor characters are a blast to read. Only the refrigerator and boy were insufficiently explored, but this is a minor point.

Looking forward to rereading the third book, which I hardly remember. Also planning to check out the BBC television show based on this book soon - it was highly rated. As for the book, the proper rating is 'a suffusion of yellow' - which covers any numb Read this book when it first came out. Great storyline - truly holistic and connected. Dialogue is excellent, and even the minor characters are a blast to read. Only the refrigerator and boy were insufficiently explored, but this is a minor point.

Looking forward to rereading the third book, which I hardly remember. Also planning to check out the BBC television show based on this book soon - it was highly rated. As for the book, the proper rating is 'a suffusion of yellow' - which covers any number larger than 4.
Hannah Heath
Such a weird book. I don't...I don't even know exactly what it was that I just read. But I know that I enjoyed every single page of it's sarcastic, hilarious, bizarreness.
The Collected Works of C.S. Lewis :: Sleeping Dogs :: Flat Stanley :: 100 Selected Poems :: The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology
Soumya
"That's it? But... but... there has to be more!" - my reaction when I turned what was sadly the last page of the book. This was followed by a wild turning of pages, flipping it over a few times, tossing it in a corner and staring at it angrily. I had waited patiently, smiled and laughed at the perfect times, even nodded and exclaimed, "Classic Douglas Adams!" when the occasion demanded. In short, I had been the perfect tea-time guest. And I was given no tea!

While all the typical humour and wit "That's it? But... but... there has to be more!" - my reaction when I turned what was sadly the last page of the book. This was followed by a wild turning of pages, flipping it over a few times, tossing it in a corner and staring at it angrily. I had waited patiently, smiled and laughed at the perfect times, even nodded and exclaimed, "Classic Douglas Adams!" when the occasion demanded. In short, I had been the perfect tea-time guest. And I was given no tea!

While all the typical humour and wit remains intact (“Nobody got murdered before lunch. But nobody. People weren't up to it. You needed a good lunch to get both the blood-sugar and blood-lust levels up.”), the promise that the first book holds is pretty much reduced to mere flashes. The plot is not as well-knit and leaves you hanging by many threads with either an 'Eh?' or a 'Meh'. The fundamental interconnectedness is also not as interconnected as what one would expect.

And oh! Dirk Gently is largely missing as his self-aware, theory-spouting, 'intellectual' avatar. Instead, he's busy playing cacth-up with life, while searching the entirety of London for a single cigarette, and his sole contribution to the entire affair seems to be his guilt-ridden refrigerator. I did consider that it was a rather sad take on how people change with circumstances -- life seemed to have grabbed our man, Cjelli by the collar and shaken all the change from his pockets. But no! I shall have none of that! I'd rather have the old nonchalant Gently, signing off his bills with a badass 'Saving the universe: no charge."

That said, it pleasantly surprised me to read some very poignant lines that just for a moment seemingly broke the character-author barrier. I quite believe it was Douglas directly speaking through these lines:

“In the past the whales had been able to sing to each other across whole oceans, even from one ocean to another because sound travels such huge distances underwater. But now, again because of the way in which sound travels, there is no part of the ocean that is not constantly jangling with the hubbub of ships’ motors, through which it is now virtually impossible for the whales to hear each other’s songs or messages.

So fucking what, is pretty much the way that people tend to view this problem, and understandably so, thought Dirk. After all, who wants to hear a bunch of fat fish, oh all right, mammals, burping at each other?

But for a moment Dirk had a sense of infinite loss and sadness that somewhere amongst the frenzy of information noise that daily rattled the lives of men he thought he might have heard a few notes that denoted the movements of gods.”

In short, if you're having a cross day, it's more than safe to pick this one up. But if you've already read the first one, it might leave you a wee bit disappointed. Oh well, at least the credentials on the back cover weren't lying...
Michelle Bacon
OMG!! Not enough of the best adjectives can describe how epically awesome this book is. In my honest opinion, it was so much better than the first one. Jam packed with hilarious situations that you really just have to shake your head and feel sorry for Dirk. Eagles are not his favorite animal, that's for sure. The mere presence of Thor and Odin in this lovely tale set it way above all the rest. Yes, I adore The God of Thunder.
Does Dirk ever find his missing secretary? Not in this book...
Travelling Sunny
Father of the Gods, Odin himself, in an old folks home. Thor having a thunderous tantrum in Valhalla. Mortals whisking between molecules to visit distant worlds. Giant eagles screeching in and out of existence. Dirk Gently solving crimes.

Good times. Good times.
Arnaud
Perfect second volume... too bad we won't any more of Dirk Gently. He was certainly a promising P.I. of the interconnectedness of things :-) ... And eagles too
Ryan Sanderson
Not as inventive or unexpected as the first Dirk Gently, but still a joy to read. Adams is so good with the comedy that it's easy to forget he's also a pretty good storyteller. He paints some great pictures here, and has discovered a genuinely compelling character with Dirk. Alas that he went so soon. I would read fifteen more of these.
Jeannie Farnsworth
Douglas Adams manages to make nonsense sensible and innately sensible complete gibberish. Exactly what price is one willing to pay for good, clean, freshly laundered linen sheets?
Stephanie
I've read it some many times I hear myself quoting it
Anu
This was a great read. It was humorous the way all of Douglas Adam's books are. However, I enjoyed the first Dirk Gently book a lot more. It had a more 'holistic' mystery solving sense about it. This one wasn't as full circle as the first book.
Steven Wetter
HA! Dirk Gently! Can never get enough! I truly miss Douglas Adams.... Imagine the wit he could unleash in today's society.
Dakota Sillyman
I really enjoyed The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. Douglas Adam's wit and humor made for a fun ride. The surrealness and mystery of it all kept me on the edge of my seat as well.

Dirk's sort of quirky but strangely effective ineptitude is a much needed reprise from the James Bonds and Sherlock Holmes that constantly plague TV and movies. Unlike Bond Dirk's female counterpart isn't some one-dimensional sexual conquest, but rather someone who doesn't actually have time Dirk's nonsense, because sh I really enjoyed The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. Douglas Adam's wit and humor made for a fun ride. The surrealness and mystery of it all kept me on the edge of my seat as well.

Dirk's sort of quirky but strangely effective ineptitude is a much needed reprise from the James Bonds and Sherlock Holmes that constantly plague TV and movies. Unlike Bond Dirk's female counterpart isn't some one-dimensional sexual conquest, but rather someone who doesn't actually have time Dirk's nonsense, because she's already a step a head of him. It's nice to see a British detective novel where the characters aren't made out of plastic.

That all being said the ending did feel a little rushed. I'm not sure what I was looking for, but everything seemed to get wrapped up rather quickly and I was left wanting more!

Favorite Quote:“What was the Sherlock Holmes principle? ‘Once you have discounted the impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.’ ”

“I reject that entirely,” said Dirk sharply. “The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbably lacks. How often have you been presented with an apparently rational explanation of something that works in all respects other than one, which is that it is hopelessly improbable?...The first idea merely supposes that there is something we don’t know about, and...there are enough of those. The second, however, runs contrary to something fundamental and human which we do know about. We should therefore be very suspicious of it and all its specious rationality.”
Jenna
Originally posted at my blog The Otaku Librarian.

It all began at Heathrow, with a large, blonde man trying to get a ticket to Oslo without a credit card or any proof of identification. Add one exploding passenger check-in desk, a decapitated head on a record player (playing Hot Potato - Don't pick it up / pick it up / pick it up / pick it), and the famed Dirk Gently, and you don't know what you'll end up with.

I certainly didn't, have any idea of what'd happen, that is. This was an odd romp into Originally posted at my blog The Otaku Librarian.

It all began at Heathrow, with a large, blonde man trying to get a ticket to Oslo without a credit card or any proof of identification. Add one exploding passenger check-in desk, a decapitated head on a record player (playing Hot Potato - Don't pick it up / pick it up / pick it up / pick it), and the famed Dirk Gently, and you don't know what you'll end up with.

I certainly didn't, have any idea of what'd happen, that is. This was an odd romp into the world of Dirk Gently and Douglas Adams, whose Hitchhiker's book I had previously read and was not enormously enamored with. I did find it amusing, don't get me wrong, but I didn't love it, say, as much as Pratchett's Discworld novels. But, anyway, rambling aside, one of my friends said that I had to read it and that she had the audiobook and that I could borrow it. So I did.

I love Douglas Adams' reading voice! The variation in voices, depending on the characters that he was currently narrating for, was great and entertaining. He went from Toerag's slimy obsequious tone (reminiscent of Black Adder in his butler-phase) to his "normal" narrative voice which kept reminding me of Hugh Laurie. Not in his American / House voice, of course. Maybe that's just a sign I want to rewatch Black Adder (again). The only downside of the loaned discs was the lack of divided chapters as well as any mention of chapters, so sometimes I got confused in regard to scene changes / time skips, etc. But it wasn't a big deal.

The humor, I did enjoy and it ranged from the simply ridiculous (the great punishment of being varnished to a wooden floor) to the snorting-with-laughter in regard to a certain scene including an eagle that I won't spoil. The plot, due to the lack of chapter headings, I got a bit confused at first about what was really happening, but I went along happily with the ride because I was enjoying it. And, of course, in the end it all ties together so I was pleased.

And oops, I had forgotten to review this since I finished it a while back. But it was a fun and entertaining read that you don't take too seriously, but you'll leave with a smile and a song that you can get stuck in your friends' heads. Wee!
Kadir Kılıç
İlk kitaptan gerek kurgu gerek de espri kalitesi açısından daha başarılı buldum.Çeviride göze batan bir şey yoktu ama kitap neredeyse redaksiyona uğramamış gibiydi, bazı yerlerde Dirk, Dick diye yazılmış.
Xeni
I am always amused and a little baffled when things in my life all end up correlating certain themes without my obvious doing. Reading this book was one of these times.

Before I explain myself, I'd just like to mention that this was the book that I was looking forward to reading, and not so very much the first featuring Dirk Gently. And yet I found the first book to be more fulfilling.

To tie these two paragraphs together, I need to bring up a third point: one of the themes that Adams decided to I am always amused and a little baffled when things in my life all end up correlating certain themes without my obvious doing. Reading this book was one of these times.

Before I explain myself, I'd just like to mention that this was the book that I was looking forward to reading, and not so very much the first featuring Dirk Gently. And yet I found the first book to be more fulfilling.

To tie these two paragraphs together, I need to bring up a third point: one of the themes that Adams decided to play with in this novel: the Norse mythology. In this book he mainly focuses on the god Thor. Back when I was a kid I had a slight obsession with mythology that only lasted a few years, so I like to think that when it comes to background info, I'm pretty well versed in my Nordic myths. In the years since, I've learned to keep an open mind to author interpretation. Adams actually does a fair job of it, actually, I find.

The part that annoyed me was how all of a sudden I had Thor and his cronies pop up at me in various ways in the short time spam that I was reading this novel (a few days). Somehow I ended up seeing the Hollywood film, Thor, although I really didn't want to, and then a friend brought him up out of the blue... And throughout it all I had this quirky image of eagles dive bombing, large hammers and coca-cola machines following impossible obtuse and large men around. (Somehow all Thor versions have stubborness and annoyance in common...).

Anyway, long story short, my cup-of-Nordic-Thorness is definitely filled to overflowing. Aside from that, I actually loved Adams' storytelling. He is so hilarious and amusing but occasionally downright ironic that it makes for great fun, even if there was too much Thor going around for my tastes. I especially appreciate Dirk Gently's views of how the universe work, and how Adams doesn't leave any annoying loose ends. Maybe it's too much 'coincidence' for some readers, but I do love me a perfect ending.

As usual, the plot is excellent, the characters at time annoying and charming but overall realistic enough for me to want to hang out with them a bit longer, and the writing was just superb. Read this book for the amusing writing if nothing else. :)
Kazima
I'm afraid I didn't like this one quite as much as I liked the first one. The characters beside Dirk Gently were not as engaging in themselves as they were in the first book, but luckily we got much more Dirk for which I'm very glad!

It finally occurred to me who Dirk reminds me of: He is a mix between Bernard Black and the 11th Doctor! I don't think there is any correlation between all three characters, there is too much of both Bernard and the Doctor in Dirk for either of them to have been insp I'm afraid I didn't like this one quite as much as I liked the first one. The characters beside Dirk Gently were not as engaging in themselves as they were in the first book, but luckily we got much more Dirk for which I'm very glad!

It finally occurred to me who Dirk reminds me of: He is a mix between Bernard Black and the 11th Doctor! I don't think there is any correlation between all three characters, there is too much of both Bernard and the Doctor in Dirk for either of them to have been inspired by him in any way. It doesn't matter though - because of the order in which I came across these characters, Dirk Gently is in my mind a mix of two of my favorite characters and I'm not complaining!

I might reread this book at some point just to revisit Dirk Gently, but I wouldn't say you should read this (you should however read Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency). If I were recommending books and this one crossed my mind, I would probably recommend American Gods instead.
Jireh Lee
I finished the book bewildered and confused. I think I might have somehow missed the resolution. I just...I don't even know. I like the interconnected chain of events, the overall theme of everything being connected in one way or another. As always, I loved Douglas' prose. I can never say anything bad about his prose. It's just that I thought the whole storyline became so complicated and jammed with different characters, it was hard to distinguish the important ones from the minor ones. More tha I finished the book bewildered and confused. I think I might have somehow missed the resolution. I just...I don't even know. I like the interconnected chain of events, the overall theme of everything being connected in one way or another. As always, I loved Douglas' prose. I can never say anything bad about his prose. It's just that I thought the whole storyline became so complicated and jammed with different characters, it was hard to distinguish the important ones from the minor ones. More than once I found my head scratching because of abandoned characters (I'm looking at you, boy in the attic.) No, seriously, what is he for? Is he just so that Dirk will know who the airline attendant is? Sigh. Anyway, one thing I also liked about the book was the concept of the gods only existing as a result of the human's belief in them. it's a fresh concept, in my opinion. But yeah, the problem I had with this book is that I got confused near the end and I thought the end was unsatisfying. I would have liked to see more of an explanation as to what really happened to the lawyer/advertising agent couple. But all in all, this is a great read.
Bee Halton
I never enjoyed Dirk Gently as much as I did A hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy. But I saw bits of the series on TV (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wqfl2) and thought I have a look again.

Well if you always wondered how Odin the all-father of Gods and something nasty ended up in the woodshed and how a coca-cola machine, an eagle and St. Pancreas train station plays into all then you are right to read this book!

I enjoyed it thoroughly!

Ich habe Dirk Gently nie so sehr genossen wie Per Anhalter I never enjoyed Dirk Gently as much as I did A hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy. But I saw bits of the series on TV (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wqfl2) and thought I have a look again.

Well if you always wondered how Odin the all-father of Gods and something nasty ended up in the woodshed and how a coca-cola machine, an eagle and St. Pancreas train station plays into all then you are right to read this book!

I enjoyed it thoroughly!

Ich habe Dirk Gently nie so sehr genossen wie Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis. Aber ich habe ein bischen von der Serie im Fernsehen gesehen (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wqfl2) und dachte ich sehe noch mal rein.

Wenn Du alsoimmer schon wissen wolltest warum Odin, der Vater der Goetter und etwas Boeses im Krankenhaus gelandet sind und was eine Coca-Cola Maschine, ein Adler und der Bahnhof in St. Pancreas, London damit zu tun haben, dann bist Du bei diesem Buch richtig!

Ich jedenfalls habe es sehr genossen!
David
I remember reading this in hardcover when if first came out in 1988--I think I even had Adams autograph it at a bookstore. I recall liking it, but not quite as much as Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency or the Hitchhiker's Guide books. Teatime definitely delivers on the Adams' ability to cleverly take a sentence in a direction you weren't expecting. For example, "It was all, thought Odin fractiously, too much for someone at his time of life, which was extremely advanced, but not in any part I remember reading this in hardcover when if first came out in 1988--I think I even had Adams autograph it at a bookstore. I recall liking it, but not quite as much as Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency or the Hitchhiker's Guide books. Teatime definitely delivers on the Adams' ability to cleverly take a sentence in a direction you weren't expecting. For example, "It was all, thought Odin fractiously, too much for someone at his time of life, which was extremely advanced, but not in any particular direction." He brings life back into the metaphor behind "advanced age" (i.e. "life is a journey") and adds humor with the logic of it as applied to a god--gods are immortal, so how can "age" apply to them? He's been around a long time, so his age is advanced, but for gods, time doesn't work the same way as for mortals.

I was also struck by the debt Neil Gaiman owes "The Long, Dark Teatime of the Soul" in his "American Gods".
Sandi
I found this second instalment of the adventures of Dirk Gently as funny as the first but in a less slap dash way. It seems that Adams has written a book with a real plot and it's a good one! It still has holes but it's just such a change to see one of his books have a real direction. I did find it a shame that the conclusion was somewhat weak but that's only a minor quibble..

There's still much silliness and it's done grandly in Adams style. I wanted to rescue a frightened lamp that was suddenly I found this second instalment of the adventures of Dirk Gently as funny as the first but in a less slap dash way. It seems that Adams has written a book with a real plot and it's a good one! It still has holes but it's just such a change to see one of his books have a real direction. I did find it a shame that the conclusion was somewhat weak but that's only a minor quibble..

There's still much silliness and it's done grandly in Adams style. I wanted to rescue a frightened lamp that was suddenly more kittenish then you can imagine. Also the battle over the fridge between Dirk and his cleaning lady as well as the fridge's destiny are my favourite parts of the story.

I really like Adams take on Thor and Odin. Even Gods need a good sleep! Also having a temper gains some pretty strange results when Thor loses his. Brilliant!

I'm going to read Salmon of Doubt partially for the small glimpse of Dirk as well as one final glimpse into Douglas Adam's mind.
Jeremy
The first Dirk Gently was deeply flawed, but I liked it. This one showed a lot of promise, at least for me, given my fondness for mythology. But really...I don't have a lot to say about it. It reminds me somewhat of Mostly Harmless: A wandering, mean-spirited, poorly-paced, and very, very confused novel without the high quality of humor present in most of Adams' oeuvre.

The "ending" (HA!) is at best, awkward, and at worst, complete crap. I felt no sense of resolution, and the first time I read t The first Dirk Gently was deeply flawed, but I liked it. This one showed a lot of promise, at least for me, given my fondness for mythology. But really...I don't have a lot to say about it. It reminds me somewhat of Mostly Harmless: A wandering, mean-spirited, poorly-paced, and very, very confused novel without the high quality of humor present in most of Adams' oeuvre.

The "ending" (HA!) is at best, awkward, and at worst, complete crap. I felt no sense of resolution, and the first time I read the book, had to reread the last few chapters a few times just to make sure I knew what was going on. There are very, very few books I have this problem with, so I have difficulty believing that the problem is on my end.

It just feels like old Doug phoned this one in.
Anthony Strawther
It took me a while to read this one. Perhaps it wasn't the books fault, as a go in and out of having an interest in reading. This outing with Dirk Gently is most definitely a sequel and brings back such elements as: multiple stories and viewpoints. Dirk being the least important in the book. Weirdness.

While it was fairly entertaining, it didn't have the fast paced action and intrigue of the first book. It was even more grounded, the only real crazy element being Norse Gods (as opposed to Robots, It took me a while to read this one. Perhaps it wasn't the books fault, as a go in and out of having an interest in reading. This outing with Dirk Gently is most definitely a sequel and brings back such elements as: multiple stories and viewpoints. Dirk being the least important in the book. Weirdness.

While it was fairly entertaining, it didn't have the fast paced action and intrigue of the first book. It was even more grounded, the only real crazy element being Norse Gods (as opposed to Robots, Ghosts and Time Travel) and said gods were not very likable characters. Dirk's misadventures were funny enough, but while he banks on taking the roundabout path to solve his cases, he really didn't do or affect much in the story.
Cindy Rollins
This was an enjoyable, short audiobook perfect for a long car ride. It is thoroughly British and thoroughly enjoyable on that count. It is quirky in the extreme, imaginative and insightful. It is Douglas Adams. I think I like Terry Pratchett better but it might be because Pratchett doesn't seem to have a bitter edge. Who am I to judge though? I have my own bitter edge.

This is a fantastical novel set in the ordinary. It asks the question would we notice if the gods showed up for real-like Thor. I This was an enjoyable, short audiobook perfect for a long car ride. It is thoroughly British and thoroughly enjoyable on that count. It is quirky in the extreme, imaginative and insightful. It is Douglas Adams. I think I like Terry Pratchett better but it might be because Pratchett doesn't seem to have a bitter edge. Who am I to judge though? I have my own bitter edge.

This is a fantastical novel set in the ordinary. It asks the question would we notice if the gods showed up for real-like Thor. It is a good question.

I could listen to this sort of deeply British book all day long and in fact, I often do.
Lauren
Back in college my boyfriend at the time lent me this book saying that it was one of his favorites. I remember reading it and being rather confused and not really all that impressed. Perhaps that was because this is the second book in a series and Adams, unlike many authors when writing a sequel did not bother with reintroductions.

The second reading was an improvement over the first. Overall I found this to be reminiscent of American Gods and yet completely different. I would recommend it but o Back in college my boyfriend at the time lent me this book saying that it was one of his favorites. I remember reading it and being rather confused and not really all that impressed. Perhaps that was because this is the second book in a series and Adams, unlike many authors when writing a sequel did not bother with reintroductions.

The second reading was an improvement over the first. Overall I found this to be reminiscent of American Gods and yet completely different. I would recommend it but only right after one has read the first book.
sanguine.shaman
THIS WAS SO GOOD. ok but, real talk, if you're here for super coherent straightforward plot and just ALL the character development, i'd advise you look elsewhere. dirk gently is a holistic detective, everything is connected, so the book is at first seemingly random and nonsensical. it later forms into a web of sorts, everything is connected, and the ending becomes apparent. but what's really amazing is all the description. i mean, what other book has the opening line "it can hardly be a coincide THIS WAS SO GOOD. ok but, real talk, if you're here for super coherent straightforward plot and just ALL the character development, i'd advise you look elsewhere. dirk gently is a holistic detective, everything is connected, so the book is at first seemingly random and nonsensical. it later forms into a web of sorts, everything is connected, and the ending becomes apparent. but what's really amazing is all the description. i mean, what other book has the opening line "it can hardly be a coincidence that no language on earth has ever produced the expression 'as pretty as an airport.'" no other. it's so good. it's dry and witty and I LOVE IT. please read.
Genevieve
This is an interesting enough book, but it's really for dedicated fans of Douglas Adams only. The thin plot wanders along, but the wonderfully humorous descriptions and non sequiturs will keep fans of Adams reading. I love the fridge that had "begun seriously to lurk" in the kitchen. Adams wonderful descriptive prose aside, the book suffers from a lack of tension and a lack of interesting characters. Gently & Kate are, frankly, not particularly interesting people. This is not the masterpiece This is an interesting enough book, but it's really for dedicated fans of Douglas Adams only. The thin plot wanders along, but the wonderfully humorous descriptions and non sequiturs will keep fans of Adams reading. I love the fridge that had "begun seriously to lurk" in the kitchen. Adams wonderful descriptive prose aside, the book suffers from a lack of tension and a lack of interesting characters. Gently & Kate are, frankly, not particularly interesting people. This is not the masterpiece that is Hitchhiker, but if you've read all of Adams Hitchhiker books more than once, then you'll enjoy this novel. If you haven't read Adams work before, don't start here.
Diletta
Douglas! Indipendentemente dal fatto che ho trovato questo libro meno all'altezza dei precedenti ciò non toglie che meriti. È molto meno olistico del primo, l'investigazione, olistica appunto, di Dirk è più chiara (ma non ovviamente del tutto, quale orrore sarebbe) ma in particolare è meno contorta, allucinante. È come sempre divertente, esilarante, surreale, entusiasmante, ma non lo posso definire geniale come i precedenti (comprendo infatti anche la trilogia in cinque parti della Guida Galatti Douglas! Indipendentemente dal fatto che ho trovato questo libro meno all'altezza dei precedenti ciò non toglie che meriti. È molto meno olistico del primo, l'investigazione, olistica appunto, di Dirk è più chiara (ma non ovviamente del tutto, quale orrore sarebbe) ma in particolare è meno contorta, allucinante. È come sempre divertente, esilarante, surreale, entusiasmante, ma non lo posso definire geniale come i precedenti (comprendo infatti anche la trilogia in cinque parti della Guida Galattica). Ma merita. Fate un favore a voi stessi, leggete Douglas Adams. Fa bene alla salute.
Saretta
Secondo libro incentrato sulla figura dell'investigatore olistico Dirk Gently; dato il mestiere del protagonista, questi romanzi sono una scatola per ogni qualsivoglia assurdità collegabile ad altre assurdità in modo più o meno casuale.
Questa traduzione ha il pregio, rispetto al volume precedente (di altro editore), di non essere costellata di irritanti punti esclamativi a ogni frase che mi ha permesso di affrontare la lettura con serenità.
La trama è sconclusionata (ma piacevolmente e diverte), Secondo libro incentrato sulla figura dell'investigatore olistico Dirk Gently; dato il mestiere del protagonista, questi romanzi sono una scatola per ogni qualsivoglia assurdità collegabile ad altre assurdità in modo più o meno casuale.
Questa traduzione ha il pregio, rispetto al volume precedente (di altro editore), di non essere costellata di irritanti punti esclamativi a ogni frase che mi ha permesso di affrontare la lettura con serenità.
La trama è sconclusionata (ma piacevolmente e diverte), il vero mistero è: perchè gli scrittori inglesi sono sì attirati dalla mitologia nordica?
Kimmie
Initially I was hesitant to read this as I didn't enjoy the first one too much. I'm very glad I did! It's now at the top of my "favorite books by Adams" list. As in the first one, the ending seems a little rushed (I give it 4 stars instead of 5 because of the ending). The rest of the novel compensates for that with its wit and careful execution of "coincidental" events. I'd like to read this again for details I missed the first time.

"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I hav Initially I was hesitant to read this as I didn't enjoy the first one too much. I'm very glad I did! It's now at the top of my "favorite books by Adams" list. As in the first one, the ending seems a little rushed (I give it 4 stars instead of 5 because of the ending). The rest of the novel compensates for that with its wit and careful execution of "coincidental" events. I'd like to read this again for details I missed the first time.

"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be."
Julien V
Can't believe I'm disapointed in you, Douglas Adams. What was that half-assed effort? Where's all the social commentary, satire, comedy or even STORY, except in the first 50 pages or so? I mean, it's "Mostly Harmless" bad.

But don't turn in your grave yet. I'm sure that if it was my first approach at your towering genius, I would rate it 5 stars and bug everyone to read this. But man, by your standards it's almost a bad book. Sadly, it's also the last complete story I could read from you, being d Can't believe I'm disapointed in you, Douglas Adams. What was that half-assed effort? Where's all the social commentary, satire, comedy or even STORY, except in the first 50 pages or so? I mean, it's "Mostly Harmless" bad.

But don't turn in your grave yet. I'm sure that if it was my first approach at your towering genius, I would rate it 5 stars and bug everyone to read this. But man, by your standards it's almost a bad book. Sadly, it's also the last complete story I could read from you, being deceased and all.

Just come back to life and put this series right, would ya?
Grant
While a sequel to Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, this book stands out on its own. While the interconnectedness of all things remains a central premise, it introduces a new cast of characters. Adams manages to show that he is never quite finished, because this book is just as good as its predecessor, and easily one of my favorite books of all time. Just like the first in the series, this book also takes a second read to fully understand because of the seemingly nonsensical, yet perfectl While a sequel to Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, this book stands out on its own. While the interconnectedness of all things remains a central premise, it introduces a new cast of characters. Adams manages to show that he is never quite finished, because this book is just as good as its predecessor, and easily one of my favorite books of all time. Just like the first in the series, this book also takes a second read to fully understand because of the seemingly nonsensical, yet perfectly pertinent events that make up the smaller sub-stories of the novel.
Michael
I gave this one a go during my weekly commutes.

It's well written, has a solid plot with a few unexpected bits and a smattering of dry humor, but overall lacks the fun of his more famous works. It's interesting-- despite being written later it feels oddly embryonic compared to the Hitchhiker's Guide series, perhaps as a result of the way those books process took them from radio show to novels with multiple revisions in between.

Regardless, it was certainly a decent way to occupy a few hours on a I gave this one a go during my weekly commutes.

It's well written, has a solid plot with a few unexpected bits and a smattering of dry humor, but overall lacks the fun of his more famous works. It's interesting-- despite being written later it feels oddly embryonic compared to the Hitchhiker's Guide series, perhaps as a result of the way those books process took them from radio show to novels with multiple revisions in between.

Regardless, it was certainly a decent way to occupy a few hours on a long drive.
Daniel
Like the first book in this series, Dirk Gently #2 starts off strongly and then kind of fizzles out at the end, wrapping up very hastily. I believe that Dirk Gently #1 and #2 have the distinction of being on my to-read list for the greatest period of time. They first came to my attention circa 1992 and I've been meaning to read them. Don't get me wrong. They're both good and very amusing. I might even read them again some day when my son is of the age to appreciate them.
Kristin Boldon
Liked this a bit more than the first Dirk Gently, but did not feel the love I remember for it back then. I very much enjoyed reading about Odin and Thor roaming about and see how this was likely a seed that contributed to Neil Gaiman's American Gods. This was a confection and not v. satisfying to me.
Originally August 2011.
2016: listened with the kids to it read aloud by my husband. It benefits from a read aloud, and the boys were delighted with it.
Nishant Bhagat
A highly unusual book which came to me as unusually. This is the first book of Adams i have read and I am completely lost for words to express what i feel about the book. But since I am committed to try I shall give out the words which come to mind first - Crazy, Deep, Funny, Ridiculous and finally WTF

This book surely requires another read cause i will know how to approach and appreciate it better next time for thor!
Lucy
Dirk Gently neřeší klasické případy, není to detektivka alias Phil Marlow, Ner Wold či soudce Ti. Gently je specifický, případy si nevybírá ale přicházejí k němu samy, a to v podobě zdánlivě neřešitelných problémů, do nichž může proniknout Dirk nej svojí holistickou metodou - všechno souvisí se vším, dokonce i to, co zdánlivě nesouvisí s ničím. Ve druhém díle Dirk bude zahraňovat svět a nenechá se zastrašit Tórem ani Ódinem. Rozšafná a příjemná detektivka :)
Melissa
I really loved reading this book - but it doesn't really have an ending. A lot of brilliant, interesting checks written and never cashed, so I can't give it five stars. It felt like his editor called, said "you have to finish," and so he just wrote three chapters that meant almost nothing and they published it. However, it is still a very clever and humorous read, and the imaginative force is five-star fantastic. I just feel a bit robbed of a good ending.
Ashley Adams
A mismatched mythological murder mystery from the desk of Douglas Adams. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul uses Norse legends to battle conflict in Valhalla, legal contracts, and (of course) the airport. The plot is a bit disjointed, but Adams' lighthearted wit prevails as we curiously read to discover the fate of Odin, the adventures of Thor, and whether or not Kate will ever get that pizza delivered. Plenty of fun.
Allen Brown
A book of complete genius. Whilst not laugh-out-loud funny as the Hitchhikers Guide series, this is neither a radio play masquerading as a book nor a five-book trilogy of a dead-horse flogger: it is actually written as a book.

The recent TV adaptations did this book no favours. For the full-on experience of Adams' insanity, read the book.
Steve
Much slower-paced than the Hitchhiker's Trilogy, but still very funny (e.g., "I've had the sort of day that would make St. Francis of Assisi kick babies.") More swearing than I would have liked. I haven't read the book this is the "sequel" to, but as with most detective novels, I don't think one really needs to.
Becky
I actually was glad I read this prior to reading Neil Gamin's American gods. (I read them back to back totally unplanned!)While it did take me longer to get into this book unlike other Douglas Adams novels, once there I was laughing frequently! I loved the book, but comparing it to others in its "shelfs" it wasn't necessarly the best. Probably more a 3.5 star!
L.A.
At the risk of heresy, I actually like this better than Hitchhiker's Guide. Maybe it's the hapless Kate Schechter, the ridiculous Dirk Gently, or the god who just wants to take perpetual naps. It's absurd, but quietly/soberly so, as opposed to the zany antics we get from Adams in HG. Not a complaint. I re-read this at least once a year, and still smile over it.
Jim
I liked this book , but didn't love it. As others have said, the ending seems to come very quickly and everything gets wrapped up in a nice, neat little package within a few pages - a little too quickly for my taste. Still, the writing was very funny and I enjoyed the story.
Diane
This is my go-to book when I am feeling low. Kate Schechter and Dirk Gently never fail to lift my spirits. I think this book is one of the most funny and clever book by Douglas Adams and I have read them all.
Dan
More fun than Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
Debbie Hazeleger
Douglas Adams detectives are completely odd, strange, yet entertaining until the end. The plot doesn't connect in all of the places, but it doesn't even matter. No really, it doesn't matter. Read them. now.
zaki
I think about this book every damn Sunday. Even though the phrase "the long dark teatime of the soul" actually appears in another, better, Douglas Adams book. Nevertheless. So I decided to reread it. Again.
Heather
Perhaps a little too random for my tastes?
Evan
Very good, has that trademark Douglas Adams feel. I still don't understand how the name "The Long Dark Tea Time Of The Soul" applies to the actual story though.
Jason Plein
Not quite as good as American Gods, the other Norse-gods-in-modern-times book I've read recently, but it's funnier, and it has a better title.
Jenny
I love Douglas Adams! I've now finished The Hitchhiker's and Dirky Gently series, does anyone have other work of his to recommend?
Dave Sanders
One of my all time favorite books. The irony and wit that Adams poured into this book beats all others he wrote.
Peter Clegg
Thoroughly enjoyable. But the mystery wasn't solved!
Andrea Turner
I enjoyed this continuation of the adventures of Dirk Gently. It makes me a little sad to know that there is only one more adventure to go. After that I will have run out of tales by Douglas Adams.
Jonathan Plowman
No, it's not quite as good as Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. Nevertheless, this is another fun read by Douglas Adams.
Daniel Griffin
Not as good as his Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy stories, but fairly entertaining.
Denae
Absolutely my favorite Douglas Adams book.(Yes, I know that's practically heresy...)
Bam
Preposterously absurd! Absolutely delightful! 'An act of God!' 'Oh ah.'
Kate
Douglas Adams, as always, is brilliantly funny and not much of a novelist.

Because of Shada, I can never picture Dirk Gently as anyone but Tom Baker and I am perfectly content with this.
Jeff Miller
Like most of his books the plotting is that important to me, but I just love his turns of phrases and turning things upside down.
Anika
Rereading this hilariously written book for the first time years. Gosh, how I missed Dirk Gently.
Dan Moran
Liked it very much. This is one of those stories that can be enjoyed over and over again, as I have done. (Finished date is of the most recent reading.)
Michael Leffel
This novel fills me with sadness, I wish the series could have gone on, but with the loss of Douglas Adams it was not to be...
Sam
Started this last night and finished it this afternoon. This book was such a riot, but by the time it ended it reminded me that Douglas Adams no longer exists in our wonderful world anymore. :(
Kevin
Douglas Adam: the one who tackles absurdity at its best with an excellent combination of wit.
Oyceter
Fun at times, but not particularly memorable
Dlichtensttein
Great book. What fun, especially after reading the other books I have been reading. I loved the author's narration too. I will go back and read the first Dirk Gently book.
Martin Jones

This is the second instalment of Douglas Adams’ holistic detective series. The first book was really about the old scientific method of detective work changing as science changes. The Long Dark Teatime of the Soul spends most of its time in the world of myth. Old Norse gods try to survive in a new scientific world. There is some sympathy for the gods, even as the assumptions required to maintain their existence fall apart in an amusing manner.

On the down side, however, I have to admit that this
This is the second instalment of Douglas Adams’ holistic detective series. The first book was really about the old scientific method of detective work changing as science changes. The Long Dark Teatime of the Soul spends most of its time in the world of myth. Old Norse gods try to survive in a new scientific world. There is some sympathy for the gods, even as the assumptions required to maintain their existence fall apart in an amusing manner.

On the down side, however, I have to admit that this is not my favourite Douglas Adams book. Sometimes the writing feels unpolished.

“There was always the possibility, of course, that the eagle would be pleased to see him, that all this swooping it had been directing at him had been just its way of being matey.”

2 x “had been” in one sentence.

There are also a lot of adverbs, which those “How To Write Your Novel” books tell me to avoid:

“The sun crept slowly across the bedclothes.”

The How to Write Your Novel writers would not like “slowly”. “Crept” already tells us that the sun’s progress is slow. Just say “the sun crept across the bedclothes”.

You do occasionally see this kind of thing in other Douglas Adams books, but I always forgive him, because a great idea or wonderful, funny metaphor will usually appear within a paragraph or two. For some reason the writing problems grated on me more this time. There seemed to be more of them than usual.

I also found the story confusing, and not so much in the funny, holistic way of the first Dirk Gently book. I felt like one of the lost cats that Dirk Gently specialises in finding. Nevertheless, when all is said and done, this lost cat still had an interesting wander.
Brian Rogers
The first half of this book is outstanding - you can't read a description without laughing and wanting to read it aloud to friends and family. it's just outright funny. the back half of the book is...just enough for someone to be able to claim that the book was finished. what should be longer scenes are a page and a half, like someone held a gun to Adams head and forced him to write something for the outlined last scenes just to get the damn book done. (Knowing Adams' ability to hit deadlines, t The first half of this book is outstanding - you can't read a description without laughing and wanting to read it aloud to friends and family. it's just outright funny. the back half of the book is...just enough for someone to be able to claim that the book was finished. what should be longer scenes are a page and a half, like someone held a gun to Adams head and forced him to write something for the outlined last scenes just to get the damn book done. (Knowing Adams' ability to hit deadlines, this is not an unlikely occurrence.) in between those two is an extended sequence at a residence hospital for the paranormal that goes out about twice as long as it ought.

Still, 4 starts - the back half isn't bad, just sketchy, and the first half is glorious. There are ideas in tghis which get much more fleshed out in later books by other UK fantasy authors (Pratchett and Gaiman especially) were I don't know if they were drawing from a common set of themes or if this is the Ur text for these ideas. Either is possible given the influence Adams had on UK SF/F. Rereading this does make the book feel like a retread until you realize that in '88 Diskworld hadn't really touched on any of these themes, and Sandman hadn't even started yet.

I so wish that Adams had been netter at hitting deadlines.
Leave Feeback for The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
Useful Links